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What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder?
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tb_a wrote:
cooltouch wrote:
Interesting, Thomas. So you prefer your X-500 over your XD-7? It's an XD-11 here in the States, and I'd have to say that, for me, it's a tough call between the two as to which I prefer. Yes, my X-570 has TTL flash, and its viewfinder may be brighter than my XD-11's, but I really love the cool factor of the older camera and the excellence of its build quality. However, I'll admit that I do prefer the X-570's manual mode over that of the XD-11's.


Michael, I have to admit that the XD7/11 is very cool and the shutter is smoother as well. However, for practical reasons (as already explained) I really prefer the X-500/570.


Both the XD series as well as the X500/X700 series are very useful SLRs. The XD series feels more "noble", the X-500/X-700 with Motor Drive MD-1 certainly is much easier to use, especially if circumstances are a bit rough. The ergonomics of the X-700/X-500 & MD-1 are very good, much better than the Nikon F3 & MD4 Motor. Of course the MD-1 makes rather loud and disturbing sounds, but that's another story.

Both series have their quirks; the XD is prone to a failure of the mirror damping system, resulting in sluggish and delayed shutter release; the entire X-700/-500/-300 series can have problems with their capacitors.

Since these cameras are cheap and easy to replace, they certainly are a good choice if reliability is not the top priority.

Stephan


PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teo wrote:

...
Don't forget the T series of Konica

...


I have about a dozen classical T series Konicas (T, T2, T3, T3new) here; they usually came with a lens i wanted to have. Roughly half of them (!) have a stuck shutter. These days, I would not recommend them as a "reliable SLRs" any more.

Stephan


PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
Teo wrote:

...
Don't forget the T series of Konica

...


I have about a dozen classical T series Konicas (T, T2, T3, T3new) here; they usually came with a lens i wanted to have. Roughly half of them (!) have a stuck shutter. These days, I would not recommend them as a "reliable SLRs" any more.

Stephan


...and I wonder how many Konica FS-1 and FT-1s have been thrown away before of electrical faults and someone said the problem is: - the flexible tracks are just clamp together and corrosion or whatever causes problems, well he took his FT-1 top plate off cleaned the tracks and re-clamped and the camera worked again.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excalibur wrote:

...and I wonder how many Konica FS-1 and FT-1s have been thrown away before of electrical faults and someone said the problem is: - the flexible tracks are just clamp together and corrosion or whatever causes problems, well he took his FT-1 top plate off cleaned the tracks and re-clamped and the camera worked again.


I did that, I'm not sure if I told it here. Very Happy


PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskalaCafe wrote:
Excalibur wrote:

...and I wonder how many Konica FS-1 and FT-1s have been thrown away before of electrical faults and someone said the problem is: - the flexible tracks are just clamp together and corrosion or whatever causes problems, well he took his FT-1 top plate off cleaned the tracks and re-clamped and the camera worked again.


I did that, I'm not sure if I told it here. Very Happy


Did you give instructions on how to take the top plate off to get at the flexible tracks? My FT-1 is half working in that the shutter fires then a wait of about 2 secs before it would fire again and the diodes don't show in the viewfinder...so it's a point and shoot camera ATM. Rolling Eyes


PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

...and I wonder how many Konica FS-1 and FT-1s have been thrown away before of electrical faults and someone said the problem is: - the flexible tracks are just clamp together and corrosion or whatever causes problems, well he took his FT-1 top plate off cleaned the tracks and re-clamped and the camera worked again.


FS-1:
When the shutter release button doesn't operate, a frequent problem, you may be able to fix it. After 2-3 decades, it turned out that this button is prone to dust contamination. If you are meticulous, you can take the button off, clean it, or replace it (there are almost identical ones available).
If the camera has other electronic problems, in the overwhelming majority of cases you can kiss it goodbye. Looks good on the shelf though Smile

FT-1:
The repair mentioned by Excalibur refers to this camera only. It's not corrosion that causes the problem, but the foam which holds the flexi-circuits in place. This foam degrades just like light seals or mirror damping foam, the result being that nothing holds down the flexi-circuits anymore and contact is not assured. The repair consists in replacing the little foam strips (3 of them). Once you get to it, it's easy as pie. For those so inclined, more here (click on each photo to read detailed instructions on how to proceed) :
https://www.flickr.com/photos/15235665@N04/sets/72157623203627474/


PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fuji ST 801

Leicaflex SL and SL2

Contarex B.E.

Spotmatic

Alpa 10D

GAF M42

Nikon series F

Canon FT's

ETc.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 8:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

konicamera wrote:

FT-1:
The repair mentioned by Excalibur refers to this camera only. It's not corrosion that causes the problem, but the foam which holds the flexi-circuits in place. This foam degrades just like light seals or mirror damping foam, the result being that nothing holds down the flexi-circuits anymore and contact is not assured. The repair consists in replacing the little foam strips (3 of them). Once you get to it, it's easy as pie. For those so inclined, more here (click on each photo to read detailed instructions on how to proceed) :
https://www.flickr.com/photos/15235665@N04/sets/72157623203627474/


yes, this one exactly
some points:

on / off -switch is slightly tricky to reinstall
I used foam that goes under vinyle floor tiles folded, I think the thinner the foam the better


PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:12 pm    Post subject: Canon Rangefinder Reply with quote

I have just created a couple of days ago a website devoted to Canon rangefinders and lenses 1936 to 1975
https://www.canonrangefinder.org
This is still a work in process, but is maybe half complete. I have also added two pages on Minolta-35 cameras and lenses and
I hope to add pages on Leotax, Nicca, Reid, and other historic rangefinders using the M39 screw mount.
Have a look... hope you will find of interest. Also, all corrections, additions, comments welcome at
huffman@gmx.com
thanks, Larry


PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
Both series have their quirks; the XD is prone to a failure of the mirror damping system, resulting in sluggish and delayed shutter release; the entire X-700/-500/-300 series can have problems with their capacitors.


The positive here is that the piston on XD is ridiculously easy to access - resealing and reskinning will take more time.

Re: capacitors - I'm not sure I am buying that. All references lead to one successful repair. Personally, I've only been able revive a Minolta by replacing a capacitor once, and there it was obvious once I removed the bottom cover that the electrolytic cap has popped. OTOH, X-700 service manual provides multiple reasons for the malfunction ascribed to the capacitor failure.