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What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder?
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 24, 2016 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used - no abused- my Nikkormats (Nikomats) for decades.

Look at the Nikkormat FT3 if you come across this model.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even very basic cameras are mechanically very complex. So I think really, you should buy cheap if you know it's going to break, and not get too upset when they do. The SLR you can throw around doesn't really exist.

I have an Olympus OM101 with 50mm, 28mm and 35-200mm lenses. The whole lot cost £10. If it breaks I won't be upset.

And actually, it's not a bad camera! It feels well made, although obviously plastic and weird. Has a really nice viewfinder, far nicer than my OM1. If it had a threaded button for a cable release and a depth of field preview, it would happily be my only SLR.

I cut my teeth on a Praktica MTL50, but they do play up. I have an MTL5 now which is good but the shutter sticks open on bulb exposures. The same with Zenits. They are great, but each of the ones I've owned has imploded.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

chris667 wrote:
I have an Olympus OM101 with 50mm, 28mm and 35-200mm lenses. The whole lot cost £10. If it breaks I won't be upset.

And actually, it's not a bad camera! It feels well made, although obviously plastic and weird. Has a really nice viewfinder, far nicer than my OM1. If it had a threaded button for a cable release and a depth of field preview, it would happily be my only SLR.


Can you focus well with manual focus OM lenses?

I have OM-10 and 28-50-135-200 Zuikos now and thought about getting an OM-1 some time.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes! The viewfinder is very bright, and very big, with a microprism ring. It works well with "normal" OM lenses, just like one of the "normal" OM series cameras.

Saying that, using a manual lens means you don't get any LEDs in the viewfinder. So you are stuck with either aperture priority, or unmetered manual, providing you have the extra manual adapter.

Really, it's a glorified point and shoot, albeit one with a backlight compensation button.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had the opportunity to get a Nikon F4s.

It's a great pro body, very well made, large and nice viewfinder, with AF and 3 metering modes.
It supports all kinds of Nikon lenses including the pre-ai.
It's a heavy and tough camera, functioning with 6 AA batteries.

It's not cheap but can be found under 200.


PostPosted: Thu Feb 02, 2017 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Olivier wrote:
I had the opportunity to get a Nikon F4s.


well, I've sold my Nikkors since the begin of this thread Wink


PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

chris667 wrote:
Even very basic cameras are mechanically very complex. So I think really, you should buy cheap if you know it's going to break, and not get too upset when they do. The SLR you can throw around doesn't really exist.

I have an Olympus OM101 with 50mm, 28mm and 35-200mm lenses. The whole lot cost £10. If it breaks I won't be upset.

And actually, it's not a bad camera! It feels well made, although obviously plastic and weird. Has a really nice viewfinder, far nicer than my OM1. If it had a threaded button for a cable release and a depth of field preview, it would happily be my only SLR.

I cut my teeth on a Praktica MTL50, but they do play up. I have an MTL5 now which is good but the shutter sticks open on bulb exposures. The same with Zenits. They are great, but each of the ones I've owned has imploded.


I concur, it's a great camera since its viewfinder is bright and it is well designed in terms of ergonomics.

The 28-80 and the 50mm f2 that come with this series are good and underrated.

I have just decided to use it as a primary camera, buiyng an adaptall 2 ring in order to use my tamrons.

Frankly speaking I find it on par with my contax 167 in terms of actual use. Buy the manual adapter for when you wish to expose artistically.

I do not understand why over the net negative comments abound because of its rotating wheel focusing mechanism, it is decent enough to use for normal shootings, surely not an alternative to autofocus but quite useable and fast.

Shutter is well working as well, camera shoots firmly thanks to good ergonomics (similar to contax 167) and a decent not shaking shutter mechanism.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 11, 2017 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmmm, I was going to say pretty much any of the Nikkormats or Nikomat cameras, but you have moved from those so.....
Here are a couple of other suggestions :
Pentax Spotmatics are all good and hard to break - M42 of course.
Canon FT and FTb are wonderful and soooo cheap - and my favourite - Canon FL or FD of course
Minolta SRT 101-303 all good
There must be some Konicas that are as good but I don't know Konica at all
T


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have quite a few copies of most vintage SLR mentioned in the postings above. While they give you a nice "solid" feeling, these cameras are not that reliable any more: Minolta SR-T, Canon AE-1 / A1 series, T90, Minolta XD and X-500/-700 have all their quirks and problems.

I would suggest a professional SLR from the 1980s/1990s:
* Nikon F3 / F4 / F5, and FM-2
* Minolta Dynax 9
* Canon new F-1 and EOS-1 series

They are not that old, they are very well made, and really reliable.

Stephan

EDIT:
* Pentax LX
* Yashica FX-3 series (especially the FX-3 super)


Last edited by stevemark on Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:28 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
I have quite a few copies of most vintage SLR mentioned in the postings above. While they give you a nice "solid" feeling, these cameras are not that reliable any more: Minolta SR-T, Canon AE-1 / A1 series, T90, Minolta XD and X-500/-700 have all their quirks and problems.

I would suggest a professional SLR from the 1980s/1990s:
* Nikon F3 / F4 / F5, and FM-2
* Minolta Dynax 9
* Canon new F-1 and EOS-1 series

They are not that old, they are very well made, and really reliable.

Stephan


I happily second the F4, but I think my Nikomats will probably still be ticking when the F4 starts getting electrical issues.
Great camera though
Tom


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oldhand wrote:

I happily second the F4, but I think my Nikomats will probably still be ticking when the F4 starts getting electrical issues.
Great camera though
Tom


YOu probably are right Wink - I don't have much experience with the Nikkormats (as they were called here), even though i have a few body sitting on a shelf... that's why i didn't mention them.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've been looking at Nikon FM2-s lately but they are a bit expensive.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2019 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
I would suggest a professional SLR from the 1980s/1990s:
* Nikon F3 / F4 / F5, and FM-2
* Minolta Dynax 9
* Canon new F-1 and EOS-1 series

They are not that old, they are very well made, and really reliable.

Stephan

I agree.
I found a perfect second hand EOS-1 N RS which is in great state and works like todays' Canon EOS.
That's fine to be able to use EF Lenses on film with pro analogic cams.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oldhand wrote:
stevemark wrote:
I have quite a few copies of most vintage SLR mentioned in the postings above. While they give you a nice "solid" feeling, these cameras are not that reliable any more: Minolta SR-T, Canon AE-1 / A1 series, T90, Minolta XD and X-500/-700 have all their quirks and problems.

I would suggest a professional SLR from the 1980s/1990s:
* Nikon F3 / F4 / F5, and FM-2
* Minolta Dynax 9
* Canon new F-1 and EOS-1 series

They are not that old, they are very well made, and really reliable.

Stephan


I happily second the F4, but I think my Nikomats will probably still be ticking when the F4 starts getting electrical issues.
Great camera though
Tom


Plenty of F4 bodies for spares and repair...known faults are shutter and LCD bleed, but then most old cameras could have faults so it's not only Nikon.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:19 am    Post subject: Re: What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder? Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
Currently I have a Nikon F-301, Olympus OM-10 and Canon T-50. All of them sort of electronic and/or fragile.

But I really want a camera that I can toss to a car seat and not worry if it bounces on the floor.


Okay, I haven't read all of the 35 responses yet, but based solely on what you already own, here are my recommendations that I doubt anyone will disagree over.

Since you own a Nikon F-301, and assuming you have some Nikon lenses with the metering prong on them, then I can recommend the Nikon F, F2, and any of the mechanical Nikkormats, but especially the FTN, FT2, and even the FT3, which takes the later AI lens mount. Of course, the F2A and F2AS also take the AI mount. A few Nikons that are electronic, yet still quite robust are the Nikkormat EL, the Nikon EL2, and the Nikon FE. Even the FG, which is regarded as an amateur camera, has proven its robustness over the years. And then there's the mostly electronic F3, which has certainly proven its robustness as a pro camera for many years.

Since you own an Olympus OM-10, then I'd recommend the OM-1, which is an all-mechanical camera. Very robust, yet compact. The OM-2, although electronic, is also a quite robust camera.

Since you own a Canon T-50, then I can recommend the following FD cameras: FTb and original F-1 (both all mechanical and very robust cameras), the New F-1 (has a hybrid shutter where most of its shutter speeds are mechanical) which can always be used to drive nails if you don't have a hammer handy, and even the all-elctronic T-90, which many Japanese users have nicknamed ""The Tank." Another electronic FD Canon that has proven its robustness over the past 40 years is the Canon A-1.

Of all the above cameras, my personal favorites, both because of their robustness and accuracy, are the original Canon F-1 and the Nikon F2. The Canon New F-1 and Nikon F3 are very close seconds.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2019 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another good electronic camera if you don't mind its looks is the Canon T70, it usually sells for peanuts and no worries about being stolen or dropped as you just get another cheap one, handy taking two AA batteries. In a shutter test review it was very accurate at all shutter speeds except at 1/thousand sec.... many old type cloth shutters speeds are not so accurate.
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/companies/canon/fdresources/SLRs/t70/index.htm


PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, I really dislike F4 - large, heavy, complicated, and not as reliable as mechanical cameras.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've bought a Minolta X-500 at launch 1983 and it's still up and running like on it's first day. It doesn't look like new anymore, but it never let me down.
I've acquired also a second copy in the meantime to be on the save side if my original dies, but obviously I will never need it. Wink


PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here in the States, the X-500 is referred to as the X-570. I agree completely with you about this camera. I own a copy and I bought it for one reason: it's manual metering mode. Unlike the "more advanced" X-700, the X-570's meter is fully cross-coupled, where both the aperture ring and the shutter speed dial move the metering LEDs in the viewfinder. With the X-700, only the aperture ring moves the meter's readout. So what if it doesn't have a Program mode. The fact that it has fully engaged metering in Manual more than makes up for that alleged deficiency.

I find it to be a very capable and quite ergonomic camera. As a bit of a plus, like the X-700, it also takes the MD-1 motor drive.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Here in the States, the X-500 is referred to as the X-570. I agree completely with you about this camera. I own a copy and I bought it for one reason: it's manual metering mode. Unlike the "more advanced" X-700, the X-570's meter is fully cross-coupled, where both the aperture ring and the shutter speed dial move the metering LEDs in the viewfinder. With the X-700, only the aperture ring moves the meter's readout. So what if it doesn't have a Program mode. The fact that it has fully engaged metering in Manual more than makes up for that alleged deficiency.

I find it to be a very capable and quite ergonomic camera. As a bit of a plus, like the X-700, it also takes the MD-1 motor drive.


Fully agree. Maybe it's also important to mention that it has the brightest viewfinder of all Minoltas, I'm not 100% sure whether the X-700 has already got the same. Contrary to the X-700 it offers auto-TTL flash mode as well.
IMHO it's the best MF Minolta and I have several ones for comparison:



PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting, Thomas. So you prefer your X-500 over your XD-7? It's an XD-11 here in the States, and I'd have to say that, for me, it's a tough call between the two as to which I prefer. Yes, my X-570 has TTL flash, and its viewfinder may be brighter than my XD-11's, but I really love the cool factor of the older camera and the excellence of its build quality. However, I'll admit that I do prefer the X-570's manual mode over that of the XD-11's.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Interesting, Thomas. So you prefer your X-500 over your XD-7? It's an XD-11 here in the States, and I'd have to say that, for me, it's a tough call between the two as to which I prefer. Yes, my X-570 has TTL flash, and its viewfinder may be brighter than my XD-11's, but I really love the cool factor of the older camera and the excellence of its build quality. However, I'll admit that I do prefer the X-570's manual mode over that of the XD-11's.


Michael, I have to admit that the XD7/11 is very cool and the shutter is smoother as well. However, for practical reasons (as already explained) I really prefer the X-500/570.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like very much my Minolta X-700 and my Konica FT-1
Lots of fine cameras here in this thread ...
Don't forget the T series of Konica

PS The Nikon F4 is a wonderful monster


PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teo wrote:
I like very much my Minolta X-700 and my Konica FT-1


I have an FT-1 and use it mostly, no way it is robust but nice to use. Smile


PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jiaming wrote:
Haven't tried a lot, but my Praktica MTL5 is excellent except for the non-functional timer.


Out of the Praktica SLRs, I;d have to say the L is probably the one I'd say is virtually unbreakable as there's really nothing to break given it's fully manual.

Of the ones I own, I have to say the MTL 50 is built like a tank. A rather square one that that.