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SHOW US YOUR CAMERAS!!
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2022 7:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
Well ... the thread title says "show YOUR cameras" - but this one is not mine:


This one a friend's camera I am trying to sell for about 2 years. Can't really get a decent price. Managed to sell F2 and Mamiya 645.

Body is first series from 1959 or -60. Finder 1970's. Lens is a frankenlens, glued t2 mount etc.



PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2022 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the only film camera I have used in the past 10 years. Wink



PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2022 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
stevemark wrote:
Well ... the thread title says "show YOUR cameras" - but this one is not mine:


This one a friend's camera I am trying to sell for about 2 years. Can't really get a decent price. Managed to sell F2 and Mamiya 645.

Body is first series from 1959 or -60. Finder 1970's. Lens is a frankenlens, glued t2 mount etc.


They no longer bring what they once did.
Condition gets important with the F, despite it's age.
It would be more likely to move with a period correct nikkor on it- a 50 "H", or similar...

-D.S.


PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2022 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doc Sharptail wrote:

It would be more likely to move with a period correct nikkor on it- a 50 "H", or similar...

-D.S.


I thought of that but I don't want to invest my own money, also prisms wihtout metering are over 100 euros today.

edit: cheapest I found
Click here to see on Ebay

And body value is not much over 100 euros.


PostPosted: Sun Apr 17, 2022 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
This one a friend's camera I am trying to sell for about 2 years. Can't really get a decent price.

What's your idea of a "decent price"?

kansalliskala wrote:
Body is first series from 1959 or -60. Finder 1970's. Lens is a frankenlens, glued t2 mount etc.

Forget about the lens. It might be better to sell the body and the finder seperately. And please clean the camera carefully before trying to sell Wink.
Being such an early Nikon F it should be saved and appreciated!

I got my Nikon F maybe two or three years ago:



The body and especially the viewfinder were looking really ugly, but I took a chance. Body and viewfinder (without lens!) were CHF (USD/EUR) 70.--, and it turned out that the body was in perfectly working condition, albeit very dirty. The viewfinder had a few ugly looking scratches on the front plate, so I polished it with some polishing powder, and now it looks failry OK.

The lens is another story ... I got in 2020 from my favourite photo dealer, and it wasn't cheap of course, but it did fit perfectly Wink

S


PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 1:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:



Forget about the lens. It might be better to sell the body and the finder seperately. And please clean the camera carefully before trying to sell Wink.
Being such an early Nikon F it should be saved and appreciated!


Reasonable advice.
I think the hulking, big, distinctive metering finders are actually sorta cool Mr. Green
They make for instant identification as well.

-D.S.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
kansalliskala wrote:
This one a friend's camera I am trying to sell for about 2 years. Can't really get a decent price.

What's your idea of a "decent price"?

kansalliskala wrote:
Body is first series from 1959 or -60. Finder 1970's. Lens is a frankenlens, glued t2 mount etc.

Forget about the lens. It might be better to sell the body and the finder seperately. And please clean the camera carefully before trying to sell Wink.
Being such an early Nikon F it should be saved and appreciated!


Lowest price I tried was 100 euros with finder, I think. but no interest.
Did not want to get any lower. Actually it is on its way back to my friend when I ever get there.

It is not really dirty, just looks like it, very worn, see brass on the edges.


PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2022 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After showing the Mamiya ZM in an earlier posting, this time it's the Mamiya ZE-X.



The ZE-X is a pretty rare SLR, and the Mamiya Sekor EF 1.4/50mm is even rarer. Very few images are available of the ZE-X plus EF 1.4/50mm lens, and I haven't seen one with ZE-X & 1.4/50 & Mamiya winder yet!

The ZE-X is a most beautiful SLR from the early 1980s. Designed as the top camera for the Mamiya Z series, it offered not only an bayonet mount with electronic connectivity, but also A-, S-, M-, and P-mode. Unlike with other SLR, you wouldn't find a mode dial wheel, however. Instread of the "double control" found in most (all?) other multi-mode SLRs (i. e. mode dial PLUS A-positions on the shutter dial and aperture ring), its design was much more straightforward:

1) put aperture ring and Shutter dial to a specific value (e. g. f5.6 and 1/1000s), and you are in manual mode
2) put shutter dial in "Automatic", and the shutter speed is set automatically - you are in aperture priority mode
3) put aperture ring in "Automatic" position, and the aperture is set automatically, and you are in shutter priority mode
4) put both shutter dial as well as aperture ring in "Automatic" position, and both controls are set automatically (= program mode)

In addition, the camera by default was set to a "crossover mode", which means if your settings can't cope with the existing light, the camera would overrun your chosen (insufficient / wrong) settings and fix the problem. To get a really fully manual mode, this crossover mode could be overrun by the operator by switching a small "MODE" button on top of the camera Wink

Unlike any other camera of its time, the ZE-X computer got information about the focus distance set on the lens, at least if a Sekor "EF" lens was coupled. This was used to set the appropriate aperture when using an electronic flash. The aperture set for flash photography was changing continuously from f16 at 1.1 m to f2.8 at 9 m. For even larger distances, the aperture would be opened to f1.4.

The ZE-X has a few more nice features such as

* an exposure override (+(/- 3 EV instead of the more common +/- 2EV)
* Exposure override also working for dedicated flash
* a AE-lock button (quite uncommon back then, but very useful)
* a dedicated switch for multiple exposures
" an electronic self-timer with positions for 2s, 6s and 10s
* a lever for closing the eyepiece / viewfinder
* A slow shutter speed warning (variable with focal length!)
* and even a dedicated electric contacts for a left hand shutter release (!)

To make it short - the Mamiya ZE-X was a very sophisticated SLR for its time. Sadly, its build quality was far from being excellent. Many ZE-X bodies these days have some problems, either concerning the electronics or the rather flimsy mechanical parts. Some obvious problems were adressed already during the rpoduction run (e. g. film rewind - the fork going into the film cartrige was changed from plastics to metal), but other flaws remain. Thus, these days the ZE-X usually will be more of an interesting "museum item" than a SLR used for real world photography ...

It's a bit sad that the Mamiya Z system never came to full fruition. Hints of its potential can be found in the ZE-X manual which shows "f1.2" indicators in the viewfinder. The camera was specifically prepared for lenses longer than 300mm, indicating lenses such as an 1.2/50mm or a tele longer than the existing Sekor E 4/300mm. In 1984, even a "Mamiya ZF" prototyp with AF was announced in the press ...

S


PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2022 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another one ... a black SR-T 101 with the famous MC Rokkor-PG 1:1.2 f=58mm plus the equally sought after Rokkors 1.8/35mm and 1.7/85mm. Josef Scheibel - an engineer working for Minolta wrote in his book about the SR-T "The SR-T combined with the 1.8/35mm and 1.7/85 is something like a dream equipment ...".




The MC-II 1.7/85mm shown here was my second ever Minolta MF lens (the first one was the MC-X 2.5/28mm), bought in 2007. However I had been quite familiar with the SR-T and its system for years by reading Josef Scheibels books: One of my high school teachers had given me a Scheibel book when I was 15 years old, and I was reading it over and over ...

The SR-T was expensive back then, and so were the lenses shown here. Most of the MC-II lenses still work perfectly after 50 years; occasionally an aperture is stuck, or there's some haze on an inner lens surface - nothing serious Wink

All lenses shown here were re-designed later on to become their "MC-X" analogues, with rubber waffles on the focusing grip, but otherwise largely identical optical constructions.

S


PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2022 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have too many, but this one has been with me the longest.
Bought new by my dad in 1973 while visiting Japan

Asahi Pentax Spotmatic - SP