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Shooting style by geographic region
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2014 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laughing Tair is sharper with better coating, bokeh come out different with most Meyer lenses if you shoot in Oriental style, most Meyer lenses went to trash by Western people, luckily different shooting style produce dramatically different images this is luck for Meyer nowadays. Try busy background, light source in background , Oriental style may Meyer won , just like in shorter focal lengths and sell it if still found nothing special, it can happen easily. I sold many lenses what others like a lot and was meaning less to me.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila,

What is the Western style Smile Can you describe it?


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My question is: what is Oriental style?


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vanylapep wrote:
Attila,

What is the Western style Smile Can you describe it?

And what is 'Oriental style'?


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I live in the Orient but I am not quiet sure what is 'Oriental style'. Does any my photos posted here were in Oriental style?


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oriental Style




PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is good example of nice Oriental style , if same shoot done by Western people with same lens, probably this Meyer lens looks crap

Photographer is Francis Ho
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150168142483063&set=a.10150168142428063.304678.567013062&type=1&theater



Photographer is Chan Man another good example of very balanced bokeh and model not just creamy bokeh

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10202118974593116&set=a.10202119079795746.1073741830.1150496820&type=1&theater



Trioplan 50 by Thomas Budidja , I doubt any people from West made same good shoot with Trioplan 50, rather they throw it out..

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10200166004416677&set=a.4276993406905.2179756.1348342602&type=3&theater


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vanylapep wrote:
Oriental Style




I am still laughing , thanks! Laughing Laughing


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I definitely can't squat like that anymore without something bad happening. But I think now I understand that you are talking about a style of photography you most observe from Asians. This is very interesting to me since I have not made any distinctions between east and west in terms of shooting style. I've always thought it was an individual thing. I'd like to understand this more and hear from others, especially those from the Orient.

And you mention balanced bokeh. I understand, if you mean the balance is between depth of field and background blur, making sure to have full subject in focus, yet still isolating well from the background. As I said, I'd like to hear more about shooting style; should it be a separate topic?


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
vanylapep wrote:
Oriental Style




I am still laughing , thanks! Laughing Laughing


Shooting Gangnam style
Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's okay here already started with funny presentation or you can start a new one.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Advanced explanation (don't take it serious please Wink):


[url=http://forum.mflenses.com/userpix/20142/big_4168_funny_photographers_13_1.jpg]

Canadian Style
[url=http://forum.mflenses.com/userpix/20142/big_4168_funny_photographers_31_1.jpg]






US American style


Ukrainien Style


Britsh style




Australian Style




Spanish Style


Hawaian Style


Alaska Style




German Style




Indian Style


Russian Style

*Somewhere in photographers cafe I have a whole thread about russian photography style Wink


Last edited by ForenSeil on Mon Mar 31, 2014 3:30 pm; edited 12 times in total


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent work, vanylapep and ForenSeil. Great stuff. But how did Attila know I didn't shoot like that? Wink My brother likes to take pictures of me when I'm in positions that aren't complimenting, none of which I would share. My kids don't appreciate that I take my camera with me everywhere, and they especially wouldn't like it if I took some of those poses.

Style, or the thought process that goes into deciding what exposure parameters to use is something we don't discuss here enough. Granted, this is a lens talk forum, but many would benefit from more discussion around the art of photography itself. The one biggest reason I like shooting manual is that it makes me think. It is a discipline that one has to develop that considers the factors surrounding any particular photo opportunity. All too easy to put the camera in an auto mode, and even easier yet when using auto focus.

Other than ensuring the shutter speed is sufficient for a handheld shot, or to capture motion as desired, aperture selection is the decision I consider most important. I do shoot a good deal at wide apertures, but I'd like to think that I give careful consideration to my subject as well as the background. Even though, I tend to like open apertures whenever the background isn't an important part of a photo. And I never want a background to compete with my intended subject. But not all backgrounds are the same; some help tell the story, and some may enhance with better definition. Again, it depends much on the subject.

Using my images posted at the front of this thread as examples, and since these were just taken over the weekend, I can still remember enough about how I shot them and why. The portrait was taken wide open because I didn't want anything in the background to be well defined. The background had many things, including restaurants, pilings, birds, boats, and even an overpass in the distance with cars passing by. In this case I thought the more I stopped down, the more the background would distract from the purpose of the photo - to portrait my friend. The other two shots were taken at or around f/5.6, what I consider to be the sweet spot. The reason for this was that the birds were a medium distance and I knew I would need to crop considerably, so wanted best sharpness. I didn't care much for the background as it wasn't attractive in either case, so I definitely didn't want to stop down any more than I did. An additional factor with the second bird was knowing it would take flight and needed to be at least f/5.6-8 so to ensure focus. My chances of a good picture at fully open was poor.

That's how my mind works in these type situations where I can't necessarily control the background, although I often position myself so as to avoid things like telephone poles directly behind people's heads, etc. Then there are the times when you might find a background that will give a desired effect. Trioplan and Primoplan users would do this. It is these situations where I think Attila is suggesting the difference in styles. This is what I'd like to understand better from Attila's perspective and perhaps some of the folks he's talking about.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Funny series Smile seriously worth to follow and learn from our friends from Asia, it is give a fresh breeze to our hobby, they often make mistakes too, only bokeh important nothing else, and get unsharp faces , but many of them shoot superb , crystal clear eyes and beautiful background like Chan Man did it in my examples.

Last edited by Attila on Tue Feb 18, 2014 12:20 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The style posted by Attila is common here.

For many old lenses with it own soul(or character), it is better to think in it own perspective. They have a (much) higher learning curve than a modern lens. They are not reliable work horses but they will shine under certain specify conditions. Best photos will be make when the lens and the photography feel good. Wink


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 12:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

But how would you describe or explain that style?


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 5:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodrim wrote:
But how would you describe or explain that style?

The first two example from Attila are from skilled photographers in here. I am pretty sure they can make nice portraits with whatever lenses they have. Sharpness is not very important for those kind portraits but the color rendition, the bokeh and the glow matters. Many lenses from Angenieux and Meyer are good choices. They charaters of the lenses help them to take more special portraits under some harsh backgrounds.

The third example showing us what a little Trioplan can do if we do not throw it out. Many people in the oriental may not have enough funds or choice in lenses. They have only one or two 'cheap' lenses. The more they spend their time on the same lens, the better they know about the abilities and limits of themselves/the lens.

You can open a thread in the Art Talk section if you want to discuss more on this topic. It will be an interesting topic and I think lots of us will be benefited if we put some efforts to share our perspectives.


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Photographer is Chan Man

Leica Noctilux 1.0 more less western style, new lens look with lesser character.

Smooth bokeh less bubble




oriental style bright , bubbles , strong lens character

Kinoptik 50mm



PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kinoptik is as French as can be - how does that fit in here??? Wink


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
Kinoptik is as French as can be - how does that fit in here??? Wink


Shooting stlye is subject, Kinoptik lens shows well Oriental style


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me, Oriental style is 'no matter what aperture settings the lens is capable of, only use it wide open'. Wink


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
For me, Oriental style is 'no matter what aperture settings the lens is capable of, only use it wide open'. Wink


very simple and very wrong , they do by beginners only, pretty much same here .


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
For me, Oriental style is 'no matter what aperture settings the lens is capable of, only use it wide open'. Wink


Yep, they just LOVE bokeh, the crazier, the better!!!


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
For me, Oriental style is 'no matter what aperture settings the lens is capable of, only use it wide open'. Wink


very simple and very wrong , they do by beginners only, pretty much same here .


Be careful, you may piss off people that spend $$.$$$ and still can't photograph well Laughing
But that's not just in Asia :LOL:


PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2014 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Extremes often go wrong, I like a lot above shoots what I brought as example from 20 USD Trioplan 50mm to 4000 USD Kinoptik. I do love to learn and amazed by them I wish to shoot same well flowers like Thomas and bright bubbles like Chan Man on above examples.