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Photography Books
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 11:14 pm    Post subject: Photography Books Reply with quote

Well, links do not necessarily have to be electronic. So post here the references to the photography books that you think are interesting for the community. They may or may not have www links with them.


PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you like photography books that are big, great quality, and cheap, I have one for you:

PARIS MON AMOUR
Jean-Claude Gautrand
Taschen Books

I paid for this big and large book only 11 Euros. It contains a very well made selection of black and white photos of Paris, covering practically the whole 20th century.
The books has 240 pages and practically all of them is photographs, printed very large, one per page.
The photos are by many of the most renowned masters of photography. Just to name a few: Cartier-Bresson, Kertsz, Doisneau, Brassai, and others.
The book has Paris in the title, but what is really about, is people.
It is one of the most interesting selections of what is called today "street photography", a definition that I personally hate, but that seems to be popular.
This book is a constant source of emotion and inspiration for me. This is the type of photography that I love the most, but you already guessed that I think, by looking at my images. The not small difference here is that these photos are not made by an amateur, but by real masters. And this shows, in every page.


PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello all,

The book I consider very usefull even if you are more advanced is this one: "Photography Field Guide - Secrets to making great pictures" by R.Caputo and P.Burian ( http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/product/175/60/122.html ).
Is is edited (my copy) when the film was still ruling. It starts from the basics of photography withount using a complex language, so anyone can understand what is about. In the second part of the book are presented different types of photography (landscapes, people, action photo, travel, macro, etc.) and for each type, a well known photographer (most of them former or actual collaborators at NGS) and his/her advices regarding the type of photography but not only.
Of course in the same series are more books, which presents a specific type of photography for who wants to study a particular one.
Enjoy the reading.

PS. Hope it is not a problem I posted here this (Stiky thread/topic). Confused


PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

montecarlo wrote:

PS. Hope it is not a problem I posted here this (Stiky thread/topic). Confused


Absolutely not a problem! I put these threads as sticky only because they are commonly looked for, so people can find them faster.


PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fans of cities in general and New York fans especially should try to get

Horst Hamann: "New York Vertical"

Fantastic shots by Hamann with his Linhof-Technorama. Excellent b&w prints!!!


PostPosted: Sat Oct 10, 2009 9:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ansel Adams "The Negative" - no link but a very good book.


PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:37 am    Post subject: e-book Reply with quote

visit here:
http://alpha-quest.blogspot.com/


Last edited by Alphavisionary on Wed Oct 14, 2009 9:16 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
Ansel Adams "The Negative" - no link but a very good book.
Not only: the whole trilogy is a worth reading IMO, so "The Print" and "The Camera" too.

Cheers, Marty.


PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The classic Leica Manual by Morgan & Lester, in two versions.

http://www.archive.org/stream/leicamanualamanu028253mbp/leicamanualamanu028253mbp_djvu.txt

http://www.archive.org/details/leicamanualamanu028253mbp


PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Edge of darkness" by Barry Thornton. The author explains in simple terms various aspects involved in getting the maximum sharpness and detail level in monochrome photography. Very well written, and made IMO more interesting by the personal anecdotes of an author that passed away too early.

Cheers, Marty.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 10:02 pm    Post subject: Historical interest Reply with quote

From 1909:
http://chestofbooks.com/arts/photography/Practical-Photography/index.html

http://chestofbooks.com/arts/photography/Practical-Photography-2/index.html


PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I will recommend Jane Bown - Exposures. She has been making portraits for the Observer newspaper for 60 years and doesn't orchestrate the scene at all or use non environmental lighting. Her portraits are truly stunning in my opinion. She uses an Olympus OM film camera and a standard 50mm lens and the results are inspiring.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Exposures-Jane-Bown/dp/0852651414


PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

marty wrote:
kansalliskala wrote:
Ansel Adams "The Negative" - no link but a very good book.
Not only: the whole trilogy is a worth reading IMO, so "The Print" and "The Camera" too.

Cheers, Marty.


+1

I found John Shaw's books on nature photography to be very informative, and also simply inspirational.

The book Color Portraiture by Paul Linwood Gittings, which was written back in 1968, is just as relevant today as it was then, in terms of ideas of ways for a photographer to market his (or her) business. I read this book back during the mid-1980s and was quite impressed by it. Out of print for many years now, it occasionally appears on the used market.

For info on cameras, lenses, and accessories, as well as prices (albeit dated now), the McKeown and McBroom books are also good resources.


PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.freemanpatterson.com/books.htm

Photography for the joy of it.
Photography and the art of seeing.
Photography of natural things.
Photographing the world around you.

I was given the set of Freeman Patterson's 'instructive' series of books by my brother, who knows Freeman a bit, many years ago, and I think they are so good for anyone who wants to photograph the natural world.

There's very little hard information about equipment and how to set it, Freeman concentrates on the thought process rather than the technical.

There's something very calm about his work, and that comes across in this excellent series.
If you enjoy the natural world, let Freeman Patterson help you photograph it.


PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are some books that have required not only passion for photojournalism, but years of work to produce. Look out for anything published by the members of NOOR image collective

http://www.noorimages.com/home/
http://www.facebook.com/NoorImages

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Darfur-Silent-Genocide-Jan-Grarup/dp/190456366X/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rivers-Kadir-van-Lohuizen/dp/3899040643/
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Diamond-Matters-Kadir-van-Lohuizen/dp/2350460908/


PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I know some people aren't as keen on Brian Peterson's books but I like and have most of them. Ditto anything by John Hedgecoe, Joe McNally, Scott Kelby, Rick Sammon or John Shaw. Reading Ansel Adams is a must, and two books I've always liked that are not so much technique oriented are Sontag's On Photography and Freeman's The Photographic Eye. (Sibley/O'Brien's similarly titled book is also good.) I also liked Within The Frame by duChemin, and B&W Photography by Horenstein.

I have a lot of photography books actually. I've admittedly pretty much given up on keeping paper books though. I put most of mine on disk as I get them because I infinitely prefer reading on a digital screen where I can bump my text up to be able to read far more comfortably. I tend to get eye strain fairly easily and since I read a lot I have to be careful of my eyes and using reading glasses just annoys me for some reason.

When I get done with a physical book I usually will donate it to my local library for their shelves or send it up to my local junior college's photography department if the library doesn't want it for some reason. At least that way a photography student will get it and hopefully get something out of it.

I figure I really should recycle my books any which way I can since I tend to read anything and everything I can get my hands on. In terms of photography I think I've pretty much read 90% of the books my library has on the subject on this subject too, good or bad. I don't tend to watch much TV or do much else these days. If I am not working or typing online I'm generally studying most of the time either reading photography books or watching photography videos.


PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

author releases free pdf of photography classic Post Exposure:

http://ctein.com/booksmpl.htm


PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
author releases free pdf of photography classic Post Exposure:

http://ctein.com/booksmpl.htm


Great find! Thank you!