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Take care when cleaning lens from fungus
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, that's a great idea!

Have to test this -- I googled and found out that you can get 10% clotrimazole cream from any pharmacist easily. It is meant for yeast infection for ladies...


PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tell us your results.
This clotrimazole cream contains the active ingredient clotrimazole, which is an antifungal medicine used to treat infections with fungi and yeasts. So... who knows.


PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

mikkokam wrote:
Hey, that's a great idea!

Have to test this -- I googled and found out that you can get 10% clotrimazole cream from any pharmacist easily. It is meant for yeast infection for ladies...


Great idea ... I just saw an expired tube of Mycoster (a cheap french anti-fungal cream) laying around, and i think i have at least one infected lens element available for "eventually destructive" testings ...

Will post the results as soon as i will have the time ...

Cheers


PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Dino.
If it works, I'll try it on my Piesker Picon 2.8/135 whose fungus didn't disappear when using cold cream (in fact, cold cream cleaned well the lens but made fungus more apparent).


PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saliva followed by a lens cleaning fluid and wipe is what I always use - saliva contains enzymes which completely destroys fungus.


PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really ? Shocked

Human saliva ?
It would be nice and so simple. Smile


PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OM wrote:
Saliva followed by a lens cleaning fluid and wipe is what I always use - saliva contains enzymes which completely destroys fungus.


erm I knew a person that had a fungus spot (oral thrush) on his tongue Rolling Eyes


PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excalibur wrote:
OM wrote:
Saliva followed by a lens cleaning fluid and wipe is what I always use - saliva contains enzymes which completely destroys fungus.


erm I knew a person that had a fungus spot (oral thrush) on his tongue Rolling Eyes


Hehe - nasty Shocked

I always lick the end of a cotton bud (Q-tip) and then wipe it over the lens. No fungus has ever survived.

Smile


PostPosted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OM wrote:


I always lick the end of a cotton bud (Q-tip) and then wipe it over the lens. No fungus has ever survived.

Smile


...and just before swig some whiskey, rum, honey or vinegar..... Smile


PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 2:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Assuming that you have purchased an infected lens and cleaned it. Then afterwards stored it in better conditions than the previous owner stored it. Then you can claim that your methods 'killed' the fungus?

However, could the truth not be that you simply cleaned off the previous growth and a new growth will not happen because simply the lens is now stored in an environment that will not support fungal growth?

Surely 'fungus killing' tips would require a control where the lens was returned to it's previous location for a pre-determined period for analysis of any further growth?

I believe that any lens that is not completely air-tight will become reinfected eventually given the right environment, due to the fact that fungal spores are literally everywhere.

I agree with the idea of air-tight transparent plastic boxes simply because there will be no fluctuations of moisture level and any external UV will prohibit the development of resident spores.

Very Happy


PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the info I've gathered so far:

Several fungal species can infect lenses - Phycomycetes, Ascomycetes and fungi imperfecti /1/. The potential for fungi to permanently damage lenses depends on the species. Some are easy just to wipe off, some will etch or otherwise damage the lens.

Myths about "infected lenses":
Fungal spores are everywhere in the air, but it takes moisture and a few other triggers to activate them. One of the triggers might be related to the lens itself (type of cement between lens elements, grease in the lens, the coating etc.).
In effect, all lenses are probably already infected, and spreading of the infection from one lens to another is not the major cause of infestations. It's poor storage conditions that have to be avoided, so that the spores cannot germinate. /1/
The old myths about "clean" and "infected" lenses are false; all of your gear is exposed to spores if you do not keep it in a laboratory.

Thus, you should store all of your lenses dry, not just the one that had fungus. Humidity: Anything below 50% is claimed to be reasonably safe. Some say, if you go below 30%, the lubricants in the lenses might dry out faster than you like. Very much the case in Scandinavia with heavy central heating during winter time - the humidity in my house is currently 21%.
If you store the lenses airtight, add silica gel bags /2/.
If you shoot outside when it is damp or raining, let the gear dry first.
If you shoot out in winter (< 0'C), you can prevent condensation by bagging the gear airtight in Ziploc (aka Minigrip here) bags OUTSIDE, before taking it in. Let it warm before opening the bags. /3/
I always keep a pile of Minigrip bags in my camera bag for this. You can take the film or the memory card out of the camera outside, before bagging so you do not have to wait until the camera is room temp.

Just my small research so far, but works for me.

/1/ http://www.mypentax.com/Fungus.html
/2/ http://www.chem.helsinki.fi/~toomas/photo/fungus/
/3/ http://www.digital-photography-school.com/photography-in-extreme-cold


PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mikkokam wrote:

Thus, you should store all of your lenses dry, not just the one that had fungus. Humidity: Anything below 50% is claimed to be reasonably safe. Some say, if you go below 30%, the lubricants in the lenses might dry out faster than you like.


I've seen reference to lubricants drying before. As the lubricants used are non aqueous there is no reason why drier atmosphere should affect the lubricants at all.
Warming the lens to remove moisture could affect the lubricants but just using a desicant will not even if you go below 1% humidity.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 4:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mikkokam wrote:
Myths about "infected lenses":
Fungal spores are everywhere in the air, but it takes moisture and a few other triggers to activate them.

Very good advice indeed, Mikko. I would include darkness on your list as well. In places where the RH of the ambient air is normally low, keeping lenses well ventilated will prevent fungus, so don't go leaving your cold camera and lenses in your bag! I would think that's the most common cause of it. But if the ambient air has a normally high RH then it's probably better to keep lenses in a translucent air-tight box with at least some passive dehumidification. Some of our members in humid locations have built lens cabinets with dehumidifiers.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently cleaned a 180 Nikkors 2.8, with lots of fungus and went very well with isopropyl alcohol.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
mikkokam wrote:

Thus, you should store all of your lenses dry, not just the one that had fungus. Humidity: Anything below 50% is claimed to be reasonably safe. Some say, if you go below 30%, the lubricants in the lenses might dry out faster than you like.


I've seen reference to lubricants drying before. As the lubricants used are non aqueous there is no reason why drier atmosphere should affect the lubricants at all.
Warming the lens to remove moisture could affect the lubricants but just using a desicant will not even if you go below 1% humidity.


Welcome DConvert!

Excellent point! (now I wonder how much does air shipping temp/pressure changes 'evaporate' greases -- enough to fog lens?)


PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

francotirador wrote:
I recently cleaned a 180 Nikkors 2.8, with lots of fungus and went very well with isopropyl alcohol.


When it was done ? You clean clean it with water, cold cream etc looks okay,but I am unsure when it will be back if not use strong chemical what is kill it successfully.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 02, 2011 11:00 pm    Post subject: Re: Take care when cleaning lens from fungus Reply with quote

Just stumbled across this threat and thought I'd leave my 2 cents.

Orio wrote:
Remember that mixing bleaches and ammonia produces a deadly gas, and that mixing large quantities can cause an explosion, especially when air temperature is high.
Actually, mixing bleach and ammonia is harmless. Ammonia and bleaches are quite irritant by themselves alone though. One shouldn't mix bleaches and acidic cleaners, as chloride and hypochlorite can undergo comproportionation to form chlor-gas. That's when it might get hairy.

Now a word on the lens coating. This is where I'm unsure, but from what I picked up, most lens-coatings are based on Calciumfluoride, or are at least fluoride salts with very low solubility in water.

I'm uncertain what the fungus lives on within the lens body, but my gut-feeling tells me is not the coating, but probably dust and other trapped biological material. Eventually the microorganism might secrete products, which attack the coating.

UV probably doesn't have a huge effect on fungus within the lenses, as the normal glas used in lenses is very good in absorbing it. The key factor to inhibit fungal growth is keeping your lenses in a dry spot. That won't kill any spores, however it will thwart their growth.

francotirador wrote:
I recently cleaned a 180 Nikkors 2.8, with lots of fungus and went very well with isopropyl alcohol.
Excellent method. 70% Ethanol could be used as well.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i've used nail polish remover (acetone).... to remove the black paint from the side of the lens, which i believe but not sure, was eaten by fungus...


PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jvg wrote:
i've used nail polish remover (acetone).... to remove the black paint from the side of the lens, which i believe but not sure, was eaten by fungus...


possible it was aluminum corrosion from electrolysis?


PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
Jvg wrote:
i've used nail polish remover (acetone).... to remove the black paint from the side of the lens, which i believe but not sure, was eaten by fungus...


possible it was aluminum corrosion from electrolysis?


at this point it could have been anything. but i'm more convinced that i was just paint wearing off.

anyway, my post about using nail polish remover on something that i thought was fungus on a paint, was just a concern about me quite possibly removing coatings from the glass as well.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 25, 2013 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use mix of ammonia and Hydrogen Peroxide, but ammonia about 10% only. Ammonia is very dangerous. But lens can stay just a sort amount of time in this mix (about 60sec). I forgot one glass for 10min and it was destroyed.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 2:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OM wrote:
Saliva followed by a lens cleaning fluid and wipe is what I always use - saliva contains enzymes which completely destroys fungus.

Saliva is the primary ingredient used by restorers of 'fine art' paintings, saliva and a Q-tip (or whatever it is they use) for that exact reason, the enzymes destroy fungus.

Andrew


PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello, I have read this topic about various fungus-cleaning substances, and just yesterday I happened to find a bottle of... anti-fungus fluid for bathroom. Literally. So maybe it can be also used for lens cleaning?


PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nandakoryaaa wrote:
Hello, I have read this topic about various fungus-cleaning substances, and just yesterday I happened to find a bottle of... anti-fungus fluid for bathroom. Literally. So maybe it can be also used for lens cleaning?


Warning!
I hear of people using this but be careful it may contain acid or ammonia. While OK for painted walls and ceramic tiles could be a killer for lens glass. And of course no good if the lens is etched.


PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
nandakoryaaa wrote:
Hello, I have read this topic about various fungus-cleaning substances, and just yesterday I happened to find a bottle of... anti-fungus fluid for bathroom. Literally. So maybe it can be also used for lens cleaning?


Warning!
I hear of people using this but be careful it may contain acid or ammonia. While OK for painted walls and ceramic tiles could be a killer for lens glass. And of course no good if the lens is etched.


There are VERY few acids that will damage glass, and no chance that any of them would be sold to the general public for bathroom use. The only acid I can think of that damages glass is HF, possibly available to the public in very limited quantities for for glass etching.
There is a chance that more normal acids will react with the body of the lens, but that's also pretty unlikely with consumer chemicals over relatively short time periods.

More likely to be a problem is if the bathroom cleaner has abrasive properties, but lenses & coatings are pretty hard...

Lemon juice & vinegar are apparently acidic enough to kill fungus. I'm a Chemist not a biologist, so I have to take that on faith - I do know both are great for limescale!