Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

The rare Vivitar 250mm f/4.5 Pre-Set Lens.
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 3:40 pm    Post subject: The rare Vivitar 250mm f/4.5 Pre-Set Lens. Reply with quote

The first I've ever seen. Very different than any other Vivitar preset lens. Notice the same knurling pattern is used on the hard rubber focus grip, the two aperture rings and even on the T mount adapter.

The two windows for the distance and aperture make me want to call this one a "Two Window Preset Lens".












PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suspect you can smell a Vivitar from hundreds of miles away! Laughing

That's a nice looking lens, Vivitar must have made a huge range of lenses over the years.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pre-1970 possibly. I don't think this fits in the serial number series.

Among other oddities is that I can't recall seeing 135 Vivitar presets in this style. I would expect that these would be out there in at least a 10:1 ratio vs a 250mm. Vivitar usually bought a whole line of primes, not a single focal length.

And then there is the problem that there are no other brands with 250mm's out there in this style or similar. This would be an odd lens even without a Vivitar brand. I don't recall seeing anything like it.

If a manufacturer made one of these for Vivitar they most likely also made them for brand X. If these are out there they are also rare.

A head-scratcher indeed. " target="_blank">Click here to see on Ebay


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have a head scratcher there, Dawg. With diamond pattern on the grips the styling is not typical Vivitar. Serial could be #75 from a 1969 order. Focus direction is opposite typical Vivitar practice.

Sigma used a diamond knurl pattern and favored the Nikon/Pentax focusing direction. Sankor also focused opposite most lenses.

Whoever made it, it's very interesting and unusual.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never seen similar one, interesting "two windows" lens.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lloydy wrote:
I suspect you can smell a Vivitar from hundreds of miles away! Laughing

That's a nice looking lens, Vivitar must have made a huge range of lenses over the years.


I'm more like a pit bull than a blood hound. I'm just persistent.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

luisalegria wrote:
Pre-1970 possibly. I don't think this fits in the serial number series.

Among other oddities is that I can't recall seeing 135 Vivitar presets in this style. I would expect that these would be out there in at least a 10:1 ratio vs a 250mm. Vivitar usually bought a whole line of primes, not a single focal length.

And then there is the problem that there are no other brands with 250mm's out there in this style or similar. This would be an odd lens even without a Vivitar brand. I don't recall seeing anything like it.

If a manufacturer made one of these for Vivitar they most likely also made them for brand X. If these are out there they are also rare.

A head-scratcher indeed. " target="_blank">Click here to see on Ebay


I'm with you on this and am on the hunt for the 135mm the 28 and the 35mm.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

casualcollector wrote:
You have a head scratcher there, Dawg. With diamond pattern on the grips the styling is not typical Vivitar. Serial could be #75 from a 1969 order. Focus direction is opposite typical Vivitar practice.

Sigma used a diamond knurl pattern and favored the Nikon/Pentax focusing direction. Sankor also focused opposite most lenses.

Whoever made it, it's very interesting and unusual.


You are correct on the focus and aperture directions. They are totally different than other Vivitars.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
I never seen similar one, interesting "two windows" lens.

Thanks Attila. I'm going to stick with that name too.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just reading the Vivitar makers code list on another site and noticed Kyoei Schoji. They might be a possibility in the origin of your latest 250.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 2:24 am    Post subject: Re: The rare Vivitar 250mm f/4.5 Pre-Set Lens. Reply with quote

You can open vivitar museum Smile


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

casualcollector wrote:
I was just reading the Vivitar makers code list on another site and noticed Kyoei Schoji. They might be a possibility in the origin of your latest 250.


You may have something there Bill. What site was it?


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 4:45 am    Post subject: Re: The rare Vivitar 250mm f/4.5 Pre-Set Lens. Reply with quote

wilco wrote:
You can open vivitar museum Smile


That's a thought for retirement.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Big Dawg wrote:
casualcollector wrote:
I was just reading the Vivitar makers code list on another site and noticed Kyoei Schoji. They might be a possibility in the origin of your latest 250.


You may have something there Bill. What site was it?


Camera Quest. http://www.cameraquest.com/VivLensManuf.htm


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

casualcollector wrote:
Big Dawg wrote:
casualcollector wrote:
I was just reading the Vivitar makers code list on another site and noticed Kyoei Schoji. They might be a possibility in the origin of your latest 250.


You may have something there Bill. What site was it?


Camera Quest. http://www.cameraquest.com/VivLensManuf.htm


I have never seen the 56 on a Vivitar lens. Saying that I've never seen a lens made for Vivitar made by them. So what would lead you to believe they were the makers of this lens? The serial number is 6XXXX.
Not that that is not a possibility . It is, since no lens like this was known (By me anyway) to exist and I haven't seen a lens (To my knowledge) made by Kyoe Schoji. I'm just asking to learn. You are one of the fountains of knowledge on Vivitars my friend. I have learned so much from you in the last few years. Any further info on this would really be appreciated. As a PS...I miss T4 for 2.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My train of thought is pulled by a worn out old locomotive and consists of rolling stock headed for the scrapyard via a circuitous route...

If the serial code system was developed around 1970, some of those codes would be for sources Vivitar had purchased lenses from in the past but, perhaps, purchased few or no lenses from after the code was established.

Using your two window 250 as an example: The serial begins with 6 which could indicate Olympus but the serial is only five figures, not the 7 or 8 usually associated with later Vivitars. I think your lens predates the system. In a fit of wild speculation I thought the first two figures might indicate the year of manufacture and the last three the serial. I will admit that I may be very wrong.

I've never seen a Vivitar that had a 7 or 8 place serial that began with 6 or 56? I'm thinking they are two that may have supplied preset Vivitars in the 60s but fell out of favor as auto-diaphragm lenses stole the march. never the less, Vivitar gave them a code number just in case. Also, Ponder & Best was the distributor for Olympus in the late 60s and early 70s.

Your 250 has some distinctive features: The windows; You see 'em on Takumars and Yashinons. Rarely on anything else. Left handed focus; (please pardon the prejudice of a confirmed Canonista); That's commonly seen on Nikkors and Takumars, also Sigma, Kyoei and Sankor. I think Nittoh and Kino ventured in that direction occasionally. Pyramid knurl on the aperture rings; Sigma was fond of that on their focus grips in the early 70s and a lot of early two ring zooms used it on the zoom control. I've also seen it on some Petri lenses. Petri and Kyoei hang together on my train of thought.

A rare lens, uncommon focal length, unusual styling makes me think minority manufacturer and Kyoei is the minor name on the Vivitar list. I know it's a lot of speculation but get enough speculators together comparing notes and some facts may come to light.

Perhaps I'll get The Casual Collector back on the net someday. I've found much to add to it, namely TX and Automount, both from Tokina. Then there's all those future links I left for Chinon, Nikon and others that I had ideas for but never wrote. Right now keeping my 18 year old daily driver reliable is consuming my spare time!

Keep up the good work, Dawg. I'm learning more with each post.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just some more speculation -

Sun, on account of the "space age" styling, less the windows. The grip pattern is also seen on parts of some preset Sun zooms of the time. And then there is the mysterious nature of what Sun primes of that time looked like.


PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Astonishing. I have never seen before.


PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

casualcollector wrote:
My train of thought is pulled by a worn out old locomotive and consists of rolling stock headed for the scrapyard via a circuitous route...

If the serial code system was developed around 1970, some of those codes would be for sources Vivitar had purchased lenses from in the past but, perhaps, purchased few or no lenses from after the code was established.

Using your two window 250 as an example: The serial begins with 6 which could indicate Olympus but the serial is only five figures, not the 7 or 8 usually associated with later Vivitars. I think your lens predates the system. In a fit of wild speculation I thought the first two figures might indicate the year of manufacture and the last three the serial. I will admit that I may be very wrong.

I've never seen a Vivitar that had a 7 or 8 place serial that began with 6 or 56? I'm thinking they are two that may have supplied preset Vivitars in the 60s but fell out of favor as auto-diaphragm lenses stole the march. never the less, Vivitar gave them a code number just in case. Also, Ponder & Best was the distributor for Olympus in the late 60s and early 70s.

Your 250 has some distinctive features: The windows; You see 'em on Takumars and Yashinons. Rarely on anything else. Left handed focus; (please pardon the prejudice of a confirmed Canonista); That's commonly seen on Nikkors and Takumars, also Sigma, Kyoei and Sankor. I think Nittoh and Kino ventured in that direction occasionally. Pyramid knurl on the aperture rings; Sigma was fond of that on their focus grips in the early 70s and a lot of early two ring zooms used it on the zoom control. I've also seen it on some Petri lenses. Petri and Kyoei hang together on my train of thought.

A rare lens, uncommon focal length, unusual styling makes me think minority manufacturer and Kyoei is the minor name on the Vivitar list. I know it's a lot of speculation but get enough speculators together comparing notes and some facts may come to light.

Perhaps I'll get The Casual Collector back on the net someday. I've found much to add to it, namely TX and Automount, both from Tokina. Then there's all those future links I left for Chinon, Nikon and others that I had ideas for but never wrote. Right now keeping my 18 year old daily driver reliable is consuming my spare time!

Keep up the good work, Dawg. I'm learning more with each post.


And I just learned a ton from this post of yours. Thank you for the answer. I look forward to the Casual collector returning.


PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

luisalegria wrote:
Just some more speculation -

Sun, on account of the "space age" styling, less the windows. The grip pattern is also seen on parts of some preset Sun zooms of the time. And then there is the mysterious nature of what Sun primes of that time looked like.


Another possibility. Thanks for the input.


PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 5:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeff Zen wrote:
Astonishing. I have never seen before.


I was astonished as well, my friend when I first saw this one.


PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks to be Panagor (Kino Precision Industries-Kiron) made, before they adopted their serial number sequencing. I have a more complete and accurate Vivitar numbering guide. Just haven't gotten around to digging it out. Embarassed


PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Russ wrote:
Looks to be Panagor (Kino Precision Industries-Kiron) made, before they adopted their serial number sequencing. I have a more complete and accurate Vivitar numbering guide. Just haven't gotten around to digging it out. Embarassed

Possibly Panagor but the jury is still out on it.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 6:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Big Dawg wrote:
Russ wrote:
Looks to be Panagor (Kino Precision Industries-Kiron) made, before they adopted their serial number sequencing. I have a more complete and accurate Vivitar numbering guide. Just haven't gotten around to digging it out. Embarassed

Possibly Panagor but the jury is still out on it.


Gee, I've lost my credibility in Viv and Kirons,,, Sad


PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Russ wrote:
Gee, I've lost my credibility in Viv and Kirons,,, Sad


Well, Kid... not so much a loss as a credibility gap. Just kidding you, Russ. It may well be from Kino. The styling cues sure seem to distance it from typical Kino made Vivitars.