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Carl Zeiss Hologon made for Leica!
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:59 pm    Post subject: Carl Zeiss Hologon made for Leica! Reply with quote

Click here to see on Ebay

Now, look at the price!


PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2008 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only 200 or so of these have been made.
So in this case, the steep price has a little more reason to be.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:43 am    Post subject: pocketable Reply with quote

When searching for something entirely different, I stumbled across this ancient thread. An excellent example of differences in price, collector interest, optics history , usability and resolving power.

The Hologon had the ultimate pancake shape sitting mostly inside the camera body, enormous depth of field, but some corner falloff. Its 3 element constuction, steep curves and anti-vignetting filter, merits conctructional fame.

Its price, however has for some time not been connected with this, or with the buying power of the group of potential users, but is related to collecting fashions which is more like the art - or the antiques market - a place for trading and storing wealth.

p.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:33 am    Post subject: Re: pocketable Reply with quote

paulhofseth wrote:
When searching for something entirely different, I stumbled across this ancient thread. An excellent example of differences in price, collector interest, optics history , usability and resolving power.

The Hologon had the ultimate pancake shape sitting mostly inside the camera body, enormous depth of field, but some corner falloff. Its 3 element constuction, steep curves and anti-vignetting filter, merits conctructional fame.

Its price, however has for some time not been connected with this, or with the buying power of the group of potential users, but is related to collecting fashions which is more like the art - or the antiques market - a place for trading and storing wealth.

p.


It is a very special lens indeed and one of the masterpieces of the then head of lens design at Zeiss, Prof. Glatzel

Come to find out much much later, that I found a rather similar 26mm one, not a Hologon, but an industrial
HYPERGON which I have adapted (was a bit tricky to do due to the short back focal).
Results are here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kds315/albums/72157627599515433

My dear friend Marco Cavina has written a wonderful article about those special lenses here:
http://www.marcocavina.com/articoli_fotografici/Hypergon_Topogon_Biogon_Hologon/00_pag.htm