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Van Dyke Brown printing - my first attempts
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 4:31 pm    Post subject: Van Dyke Brown printing - my first attempts Reply with quote

After a few months of gathering information on alternative photography printing processes, ordering chemicals and different sorts of paper I finally was able to make my first prints in Van Dyke Brown.
The first harder job was to make the digital negative. Not all transparency films are well suited for the task. After testing more transparency films I came to the conclusion that the Pictorico PRO Ultra Premium OHP Transparency Film, the one the all the alternative printing masters recomand, really is the best. If it was easyer to find I wouldn't try to find a replacement, but it took me some time and patience to find a dealer. Anyway, the Staedtler Lumocolor Transparent Film is worth trying, too (I'll test it more when I'll have the time).

After struggling for a few days (well, in fact nights...) with Photoshop curves for the digital negative on diferent sorts of paper I was able to get relatively satisfying results for this stage of my journey into the Van Dyke Brown printing process.

Here are my first attempts:






And one toned with Selenium Toner:


For the moment my sensitiser solution was finished and I have just ordered a new one. When I have all the chemicals I'll make my own sensitiser, but till then I have to use some already-made solution.

The most difficult part for me now is to find the best paper sort. Different papers give huge differences in the final print.
The aquarelle paper that gave me the best results till now is, unfortunately, too rough for small prints/high detail. I have already ordered some Sumi-e Chinese Red Star rice paper to test and I'll order some Herschel Platinotype hand-made paper and some Japanese fine art paper as well.
I have tersted some inkjet high quality photo papers as well, but with awful results. Only the Epson Archival Mat and some fine art paper from Canson deserves further tests, but only after washing them in a slightly acidic water for 15-30 min and dryed.

What is your experience with Van Dyke Brown printing and alternative printing processes?


PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like 1 Like 1 Like 1 excellent Dan!!

The little I know about alternative processes is that Japanese Rice Paper works very well, yet
is tricky to handle as it is very fine and rips easily.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2016 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Excellent results! Surprised


PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Klaus and Miran!


PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2016 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congrats Like 1


PostPosted: Thu Nov 10, 2016 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you!


PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
The little I know about alternative processes is that Japanese Rice Paper works very well, yet
is tricky to handle as it is very fine and rips easily.


Today I've received both the chemicals and the rice paper.
I've just prepared some test sheets, half of them sized and half unsized (some papers give very different results if the paper is pre-sized for 30 min. in slightly acidic water - water+few drops of citric acid). While sizing the paper I've realized you're right - it is very difficult to handle it while it's wet. Just like in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLIt_qD0JlU

I'll need to make a handeling tool, just like the one used by the Japanese in the video and I'll need to test the paper with the same negatives used before to be able to draw a conclusion. Luckily we have 5 free days in Romania begining with tommorow (our National Day) and I'll have time for testing.Cool


PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dan_ wrote:
kds315* wrote:
The little I know about alternative processes is that Japanese Rice Paper works very well, yet
is tricky to handle as it is very fine and rips easily.


Today I've received both the chemicals and the rice paper.
I've just prepared some test sheets, half of them sized and half unsized (some papers give very different results if the paper is pre-sized for 30 min. in slightly acidic water - water+few drops of citric acid). While sizing the paper I've realized you're right - it is very difficult to handle it while it's wet. Just like in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLIt_qD0JlU

I'll need to make a handeling tool, just like the one used by the Japanese in the video and I'll need to test the paper with the same negatives used before to be able to draw a conclusion. Luckily we have 5 free days in Romania begining with tommorow (our National Day) and I'll have time for testing.Cool


Like 1 small Like 1 small Like 1 small wishing you best of luck Dan!