Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Trioplan again but different - sons of the same mother
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 4:22 pm    Post subject: Trioplan again but different - sons of the same mother Reply with quote

We all know that the Trioplan 2.8/100 silver model is the holy grail of bubble ring bokeh, and the little brother 2.9/50 does quite well, but I would like to know more about all the others. I will soon have a 3.5/75 (from Welta folding camera) and will thoroughly test that one. However, there are several more variations of focal length and max aperture. I would like this to include the lenses found on folding cameras as well - basically everything Trioplan.

I would imagine the lens design would be different in some respects by application. For instance, a folding camera lens is more compact, so must be different from a SLR, correct? The ultimate goal of this exercise is to understand what might be expected from each variant; specifically, bokeh and sharpness. I hope you will participate if you have a variant.

Currently, I have only shot with 2.9/50 Trioplan for Altix. I will start with pictures and comment on that lens. I have found my copy, which came to me in near mint condition, to be surprisingly sharp even at wide open. Very bright spots will display some glow similar to the big brother, but I think sharper. The bokeh rings are there and very good, but maybe not quite exactly the same as the 100mm. I do highly recommend the lens.







PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Trioplan is a Trioplan is a Trioplan. Laughing

Like your pictures


PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like them too;) decided to go the cheap route and got my hands on a broken Altix iv, gonna rip me the lens off and do a conversion!!


PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why do I have a sudden urge to drink champagne? Lovely captures!


PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GoldMark wrote:
A Trioplan is a Trioplan is a Trioplan. Laughing

Like your pictures


But is it? What I mentioned in my opening post is that they have been made in widely different focal lengths and configurations. I already know the difference in bokeh between the 2.8/100 and 2.9/50, which isn't drastic, but I do wonder about the others. I'm hoping there will be some folks here that have other Trioplan variants that car show images and report their impressions.


PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you think a Trioplan is very different from a Triotar, like from a broken rollei B 35 (40mm/3.5)?
There are quite some other triplets on old folders that could be interesting?
Or is there something really special in the build of a Trioplan that delivers this kind of bokeh?
Fundamentally different from Novar, Radionar, Agnar, Cassar etc.?
The samples make me very curious about that, but I don't feel ready yet to dismantle my old folders!


PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know the answer to that yet, but hope we learn some things from this thread. As I mentioned, I have a 3.5/75 coming that I will have to adapt, then test. That lens is from a folding camera. I've also seen a 2.9/75 and a 2.9/105 on a folding camera. I hesitate in buying too many until I've seen some results.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 12:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is a bit exciting, and I have some oldies laying around that might be interesting.
Like an Agfa Isoly III boxcamera, with Agnar 3.5/60mm.
Mmm ... a bit too charming to take it apart.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 3:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're pics are amazing Woodrim. Even when you're playing with Bokeh!


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 4:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Edited

Last edited by bernhardas on Sun Jul 03, 2016 7:14 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 11:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

f you take lenses apart, as some are want to do from time to time, you will discover that some have the sides of the elements painted black, some don't. That, coupled with how well designed the internal baffling is, gives you the answer to why some lenses have these outlines on the bokeh circles.

I've got 8 or 9 triplets for my 6x9century, some Schneider Radionars, some Meyer Trioplans, some Kodak Anastigmats etc. Some have this bright outline, some don't. Some of my tessar types have the bright outline, some don't.

Therefore it's not a matter of the lens's formula, but of specifics of how it's constructed that matter in this phenomenon.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
f you take lenses apart, as some are want to do from time to time, you will discover that some have the sides of the elements painted black, some don't. That, coupled with how well designed the internal baffling is, gives you the answer to why some lenses have these outlines on the bokeh circles.

I've got 8 or 9 triplets for my 6x9century, some Schneider Radionars, some Meyer Trioplans, some Kodak Anastigmats etc. Some have this bright outline, some don't. Some of my tessar types have the bright outline, some don't.

Therefore it's not a matter of the lens's formula, but of specifics of how it's constructed that matter in this phenomenon.


+1


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
f you take lenses apart, as some are want to do from time to time, you will discover that some have the sides of the elements painted black, some don't. That, coupled with how well designed the internal baffling is, gives you the answer to why some lenses have these outlines on the bokeh circles.....


No, it depends on optical construction. Lenses with background soap bubble bokeh have over corrected spherical aberration. They have smooth bokeh in foreground.

The Meyer Diaplan has the central lens with blackend sides. Front and back lens have uncoated sides.
Even after blackening the front and back lens the bokeh effect stays the same.

There are lenses with variable spherical aberration, like the Nikon DC Nikkor 105 and 135mm f/2.0. There one could control the bokeh behaviour.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can also alter the amount of spherical aberration of a humble tessar, you simply increase the distance between the front two elements. It's an old trick of large format photographers, they did it to get a softer more glowy look on portraits if they didn't have a dedicated portrait lens.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 13, 2014 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Edited

Last edited by bernhardas on Sun Jul 03, 2016 7:14 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 3:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found this very interesting Trioplan-Primotar image comparison...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gideonpp/11552486005/


PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, the Primotar 135 has the same bokeh circles as a Trioplan. I pointed that out a couple of years ago. Primotar prices haven't gone up so I guess no-one noticed.


PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodrim wrote:
Found this very interesting Trioplan-Primotar image comparison...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gideonpp/11552486005/

That man Gideon, made a modification on Primotar, I saw his works on facebook


PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IAZA wrote:
woodrim wrote:
Found this very interesting Trioplan-Primotar image comparison...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/gideonpp/11552486005/

That man Gideon, made a modification on Primotar, I saw his works on facebook


Really? Can you point us to that?


PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

from your flickr link:

Quote:
meyer primotar mod vs trioplan


PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tedat wrote:
from your flickr link:

Quote:
meyer primotar mod vs trioplan


Aha, I had read that as short for model. I will ask the fellow what he did.


PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have just purchased a Diaplan 2.8/100. I will be able to provide images, but unfortunately I do not have the 2.8/100 Trioplan for comparison.