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Ordering Kodak Film Direct
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:00 pm    Post subject: Ordering Kodak Film Direct Reply with quote

If you'd like to order Kodak films direct from Kodak in various sizes and lengths, here is a good link to use:

http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Products/Product_Information/Ordering_Info/index.htm

From here, you can contact a local rep and obtain a quote. I got a quote this morning for about $200 for a 400-foot roll of Double X, which I'll likely order this week so I can take a bunch of Double X with me to Japan next month.


PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for link! Have safe & fun journey...


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:18 am    Post subject: Re: Ordering Kodak Film Direct Reply with quote

David wrote:
I got a quote this morning for about $200 for a 400-foot roll of Double X, which I'll likely order this week so I can take a bunch of Double X with me to Japan next month.


Thanks for the link, David. The deal you mention above works out to $2.50 a roll per 36 exp. roll. Which is a good deal, these days. Me, I won't be buying any anytime soon. I can't afford to spend that much on film at one sitting.

What do you plan to shoot for color? I was sitting here thinking about how, when I was in Japan, I just bought film as I needed it, which in my case was Fujichrome. But things have changed a lot since then. Maybe Yebisu would like to weigh in as to color film emulsion price and availability?


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 8:24 am    Post subject: Re: Ordering Kodak Film Direct Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
David wrote:
I got a quote this morning for about $200 for a 400-foot roll of Double X, which I'll likely order this week so I can take a bunch of Double X with me to Japan next month.


Thanks for the link, David. The deal you mention above works out to $2.50 a roll per 36 exp. roll. Which is a good deal, these days. Me, I won't be buying any anytime soon. I can't afford to spend that much on film at one sitting.

What do you plan to shoot for color? I was sitting here thinking about how, when I was in Japan, I just bought film as I needed it, which in my case was Fujichrome. But things have changed a lot since then. Maybe Yebisu would like to weigh in as to color film emulsion price and availability?


Did someone mention my name? Wink

Here's the approx. prices from Yodobashi Camera in Shinjuku or any of the larger Kitamura Camera stores you'll see around Japan. Best place to buy film is the Yodobashi Camera in Shinjuku. Their film section is across the street from the Yodobashi DSLR store in it's own little space. They have everything but the European films. They do have some Fomapan though. Apart from Yodobashi any of the larger Bic Cameras and Kitamura Cameras carry a decent range of films.

Black and White 35mm (36 exp.)
Neopan Presto / Acros / SS 410 yen
Kodak TriX / Tmax 100/400 440 yen
Regular speed Ilford films around 500 yen
Kentmere 450 yen

Black and White 120
Neopan Acros 1800 yen (5 pack)
Tmax 100 and 400 1800 yen (5 pack)
Trix 2000 yen (5 pack)
Ilford beyween 460 yen and 580 yen for a single roll

Color Print Film 35mm (36 exp.)
Ektar 600 yen
Gold 200 (24 exp.) 178 yen
Super Gold 400 5 pack 2000 yen (24 exp. 5 pack is only 1000 yen though)
Fuji pro 400 800 yen
Fuji superia premium 800 yen
Fuji Superia Xtra 5 pack 2000 yen
Fuji Natura iso1600 (only available in Japan as far as I know) 890 yen

Slide Film 35mm (36 exp.)
Velvia 50 1000 yen
Velvia 100 800 yen
Velvia 100f 1000 yen
Provia 100f 1000 yen
Provia 400X 1200 yen

Slide Film 120 (5 roll packs)
Velvia 50, 100, 100f, Provia 100f all between 2600 and 3000 yen
Provia 400x 4200 yen

Hope this helps


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good to see you have a decent selection. Actually, those prices are very good, for the most part. About as cheap as I ever see them here in Houston, maybe cheaper.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are good prices! On my Saturday in Shinujuku I'll stop at the store.

For color, I only shoot reversal film anymore. I decided I don't think print color film has suitable quality compared to DSLR sensors. The one exception to that being 127 film, which is only made in color print film.

But, I still prefer black and white negative film over DSLR conversions and color slide film whenever possible.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:

For color, I only shoot reversal film anymore. I decided I don't think print color film has suitable quality compared to DSLR sensors.


I've had the reversal-film-only mindset for many years. Almost 30 in fact. I have just always felt that slide film is superior to print film, not due to comparison with DLSR sensors, but because of comparing it with print film. Typically slide film has better color saturation and sharpness than most any print film. But with its relative scarcity, high cost, and high cost for processing (none of which used to be true when I shot slides a lot back in the day), it's become sort of a special treat for me, anymore.

Have you tried Kodak's new Portra 160 yet? It has become my favorite color print emulsion. I like it better than Ektar. Its colors are always so accurate for me, and I think its fine detail is every bit as good, if not better, than Ektar as well as most slide film. This stuff might just be the answer for an old slide duffer like me.


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did make topic sticky for a while, nice to know direct order is available.

I am green (envy) to visit Japan was my dream long time ago, look forward your pictures! Have a pleasant journey, enjoy your trip!


PostPosted: Fri Feb 22, 2013 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
Those are good prices! On my Saturday in Shinujuku I'll stop at the store.

For color, I only shoot reversal film anymore. I decided I don't think print color film has suitable quality compared to DSLR sensors. The one exception to that being 127 film, which is only made in color print film.

But, I still prefer black and white negative film over DSLR conversions and color slide film whenever possible.


Here's the address for the Yodobashi film store it's a couple of streets away from the main store and across the street from the back entrance of dslr/pro yodobashi store. It's on a back street so it's a bit difficult to find. Put this address into Google maps.
Tōkyō-to, Shinjuku-ku, Nishishinjuku, 1丁目16 ビル


PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

nice to know this link for ordering. however, for us outside US its quite useless - everything depends on local distributor Sad


PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can say that in the U.S. this is a pretty painless experience. I sent EIAmericas@kodak.com an e-mail requesting a quote (specifying the shipping state), which they provided the next day. Then I just replied to the quote with my credit card and shipping info. It was pretty simple and hopefully I'll have time to shoot a few rolls of Double X before the end of March.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2013 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

that is nice. is there any minimum amount you need to buy?


PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2013 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just bought one 400-foot roll, so it doesn't seem like there's a minimum order.


PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I received the Double-X last week and spooled a bunch onto an old flanged film spool from an Ilford P4 150-foot roll. That nests very nicely inside a Western- or Watson-type bulk loader. I shot a test reel today to ascertain the ISO in D-76. I'll be developing at 1:1 as though it were 100 ISO film. I shot in half-stop increments at f16 (sunny subject) from 1/30th to 1/2,000th. I suspect the proper exposure will be between ISO 80 and 250.


PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kodak says its iso250 under daylight, however for crispy contrast I better like to push it to iso400


PostPosted: Sat Mar 09, 2013 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

David, waiting to hear about your results. I've not done a lot of 1:1 developing, almost all of which has been with Tri-X. With a medium format size negative, the more obvious grain caused by the 1:1 developing isn't really objectionable, but with 35mm I find it somewhat annoying. So I'm curious as to your results.

I've seen this link before here at the forum -- or at least I thought I did -- and I thought it was this thread, but apparently not. Anyway, here's a set of Double-X images on Flickr taken @ ISO 400. The author comments on shooting it at ISO 200 and getting good results too:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/timeshare/6733114785/

Really it looks outstanding at ISO 400. Notice the comments regarding shadow detail in the image. There is no blocking up of shadow detail at all, except maybe for a little on the trash basket in the far right of the image. But that I can live with.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So I've used about 100 feet of the 5222. I've developed it almost exclusively in Rodinal since I have times for that. My D-76 and Microdol-X experiments have not been meaningfully less grainy.

https://picasaweb.google.com/102333270936007447976/OM2NBlackTest#

https://picasaweb.google.com/102333270936007447976/122113OMG#5961610925933880370

https://picasaweb.google.com/102333270936007447976/122113F#

So it's a VERY high-grain film. In fact, sometimes the results are almost unusable. That surprised the heck out of me. I used 5207 (250D) a lot and there's almost zero grain. I've found that the grain is well hidden with low-key images, and that 5222 seems very well suited for nice tonality in low key.

I have noticed that it responds very well to darkroom printing with darkroom images being significantly less grainy.

I'm going to keep trying to learn how to master this film. I've definitely seen better results than these on the web.