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Nikon DSLR and manual focus lenses
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Karhallarn wrote:
Nikkor and Medium format lenses fit with glasless adapters!


Oops, not a good news to me because I don't have any Nikkor lens.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anyone here using D7000? I have a chance to upgrade my D90 and D7000 is my first thought after reading reviews and some other forum's threads. I'm using AF lenses as well as MF ones ( Nikon mount and M42 with adapters ).
I was also thinkig of D300/D300s, but most reviews I've read are strongly in favour of D7000 and D300s appears to be similarily priced ( used bodies ).

Any advice welcome. Thanks.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2012 6:00 pm    Post subject: D7000 vs D300s Reply with quote

Hi,
I suggest the D300s. I use it for manual lens also. Body has internal focus measuring and exposure display and it works with my old M42 lens perfectly. I use my lens without adapter but achived infinity with a small modification. Not need additional lens. My best pictures made by Pancolar 50 and Sonnar 135 lens.
Regards,


PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lena wrote:
Anyone here using D7000? I have a chance to upgrade my D90 and D7000 is my first thought after reading reviews and some other forum's threads. I'm using AF lenses as well as MF ones ( Nikon mount and M42 with adapters ).
I was also thinkig of D300/D300s, but most reviews I've read are strongly in favour of D7000 and D300s appears to be similarily priced ( used bodies ).

Any advice welcome. Thanks.


Reading the reviews, the D300s appears to be more of a "pro" camera than the D7000 - better build, more AF points (including more cross-type sensors), AF-ON for back button focussing, and lots more. On the other hand, the D7000 has a newer and better sensor. The D300s 12MP sensor was used previously in the D300, D90 and D5000. DxOMark shows that there's little between them in terms of sensor performance - although your D90 is probably better than the D300s. DxOMark also indicates that the D7000 16MP sensor is much better than all of them. That's my experience. I don't have a D300s but I do have a D7000 and a D5000. In my hands, the D7000 produces cleaner crisper pictures than the D5000. In part that might be because I've been using it continously for the last 18 months - the most recent "third" of my photography career. However I do think that the higher resolution of the D7000 makes a difference - the pixel spacing of the D7000 is very similar to that of the D800.

Most of my photography is carried out with AF lenses. It appears that my copy of the D7000 is suffering from back-focussing. The in-camera micro-adjust seems to have cured the problem but I'm wondering if it's worth sending it back for adjustment under warranty. It's something to think about if you're buying a used body.


PostPosted: Thu Dec 27, 2012 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you both.

Currently a new D7000 body sells for about the same as a nice second-hand D300s so I think I'll get myself a new camera. I desperately need the AF fine tuning since I love my Tokinas and the D90 is simply not getting the AF right with any of the two lenses I have. The situation with Tamron is slightly better, but not satisfactory either.

I read a number of user posts on the national Nikon forum and there were many D7000 bodies that needed calibration, especially from the series beginning with 64... Basically people who managed to get the focus right with an adjustment of +/- 5-7 didn't send the cameras, but some Tokina users claimed that even -20 wasn't enough to get the focus right. Fortunately my next-door neighbour runs a camera shop and this would be my third camera from him so I hope he will assist me in getting a good body without any AF problems.


PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I finally decided to get a DSLR, after many years of resisting to take the "digital" plunge, my choice of camera was predicated solely on one thing, the fact that I had a dozen AI and AIS lenses from 16mm to 600mm and compatibility was a hard and fast requirement. Autofocus held no fascination for me. Why should it? I had been focusing manually for 40 years and it posed no limitations for me. I had owned two zooms in my life, an 80-200mm f/4.5 non-AI and 36-72mm f/3.5 Series E, but they too were gone by this time. I also had no desire whatsoever to get anything in DX format as I did not want my oft used 20mm Nikkor to become a 30mm Nikkor, I already had a 35mm Nikkor. The D3 series at the time was more than I was willing to pay so the D700 with the accessory battery pack seemed to be the best alternative. Still, it came to about 3 grand, which was a hard sell to my wife. I explained to her that at the time I got my F2 and MD-2, the price back then was probably close in "equivalent dollars" to what the D700 was costing me. 3 years on I am still very happy with it though I am still a somewhat ambivalent when it comes to digital. The D700 is a workhorse in work where a client wants proof sheets that day, something that would be very difficult to pull off with film since I do not do photography as a full time profession. Having looked at one in a camera store, several trusty Nikkors in hand, it became immediately obvious to me that the standard focusing screen simply was not going to cut it. I ordered a microprism/ground glass screen from focusingscreen.com the same day I ordered my D700. It arrived the day after the camera did. It took 10 minutes to swap out the screens and it has worked out beautifully. I have been looking for a more up to date camera and looked hard at the D800 but since no one offered manual focusing screens at the time, I looked at a D3X as D3 screens were plentiful. Now that focusingscreen.com makes screens for the D800 I may look at it again later on this year.

In spite of all of this, 95% of all of my personal images are still shot with film, the majority of which are shot with the Hasselblad unless I need an equivalent focal length I do not have with the Blad


PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2014 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi everyone. I was wondering which focal length is the best to shoot full length portraits on a DX cropped sensor camera (Nikon D3100)? I own a Carl Zess Pancolar 50/1.8 and Chinon 135/2.8. I was hoping that Chinon would be able to take that kind of shots, but it is somehow too short. What focal lengths should I check out and which lens are the best?


PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2014 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

otto_tz wrote:
Hi everyone. I was wondering which focal length is the best to shoot full length portraits on a DX cropped sensor camera (Nikon D3100)? I own a Carl Zess Pancolar 50/1.8 and Chinon 135/2.8. I was hoping that Chinon would be able to take that kind of shots, but it is somehow too short. What focal lengths should I check out and which lens are the best?


this was answered in your other post


PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I got my D610 today....focuses great with manual focus lenses I've got....the LED focus dot confirms my eye perfectly Wink


PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations!


PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2014 5:35 am    Post subject: 300mm/4.5 Nikkor-H on the D610 Reply with quote

1st day out with the big gun...the 300mm/4.5 Nikkor-H on the D610....all shot wide open @ ISO 3200