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Mamiya XTL and X1000 - high tech SLRs from the early 1970s
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2020 10:39 pm    Post subject: Mamiya XTL and X1000 - high tech SLRs from the early 1970s Reply with quote

Both the Mamyia Auto XTL and the later X1000 are technical marvels from early 1970s. Both are virtually unknown to the "normal" collector who focuses on Nikon, the Canon, Pentax and - maybe - the Minolta series.

The Auto XTL had (at that time) unique features like the combination of AE and switchable spot / integral metering or the specially shaped focusing grips. The two cameras (XTL and X1000) had also a unique bayonet mount, the Mamiya ES mount. A wide range of lenses from 21mm to 800mm was available, but most of them are really hard to find these days. I have some of the most common ones such as the 2.8/28mm, the 1.8 and the 1.4/55mm, the 3.5/200mm and the 4.5/90-230mm zoom.



Today i got a nice looking XTL from Scottish collector near Zurich, together with the Sekor ES 1.8/55mm. He had recently found the camera in a thrift shop and was seemingly eager to get rid of that crazy monster Wink. The X1000 was bought in another thrift shop, some years ago, along with the 28mm lens. Later I found also the 1.4/55mm (in a local auction), the 3.5/200mm and the 90-230mm zoom (flea market).

Does anyone else have these SLR, or even collect its Sekor ES lenses?

Stephan


PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2020 1:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice looking nice features cameras. I think of Medium Format cameras when I see Mamyia.


PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2020 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
Nice looking nice features cameras. I think of Medium Format cameras when I see Mamyia.


Mamiya was very "disruptive" concerning its 35mm SLRs. And rather innovative, too. Between 1960 and about 1984 (when they gave up 35mm SLRs due to bankruptcy of their main distributor, Osawa) they introduced six or seven mounts:

1) Mamiya SLR with modified Exacta bayonet (extremely rare, around 1960)
2) Mamiya TL/DTL series with M42
3) Mamiya XTL series with Sekor ES bayonet (around 1971)
4) Mamiya DSX/MSX series with Sekor SX mount (proprietary modified M42 for open aperture metering)
5) Mamiya NC1000 series with Sekor CS bayonet
6) Mamiya ZE/ZM series with Sekor E and EF bayonet
7) Mamiya ZF with Mamiya autofocus mount (prototype only, about 1984)

Probably slightly too much innovation, I guess ...

S


PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2020 7:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had several Mamiya-Sekor E series lenses, never got to use them though as I was never able to find a working Z series body. The electronics in them are very unreliable.


PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2020 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
visualopsins wrote:
Nice looking nice features cameras. I think of Medium Format cameras when I see Mamyia.


Mamiya was very "disruptive" concerning its 35mm SLRs. And rather innovative, too. Between 1960 and about 1984 (when they gave up 35mm SLRs due to bankruptcy of their main distributor, Osawa) they introduced six or seven mounts:

1) Mamiya SLR with modified Exacta bayonet (extremely rare, around 1960)
2) Mamiya TL/DTL series with M42
3) Mamiya XTL series with Sekor ES bayonet (around 1971)
4) Mamiya DSX/MSX series with Sekor SX mount (proprietary modified M42 for open aperture metering)
5) Mamiya NC1000 series with Sekor CS bayonet
6) Mamiya ZE/ZM series with Sekor E and EF bayonet
7) Mamiya ZF with Mamiya autofocus mount (prototype only, about 1984)

Probably slightly too much innovation, I guess ...

S

I have the impression TL/DTL was just a test ball in 35mm format. How many lenses for the system were actually made by Mamiya?
DTL proved to them 35mm was worth a shot and they came up with ES bayonet and lens line up which seems to be of their own making.
Apparently proprietary ES wasn't received well, so they reverted to M42/SX.

Then in rapid succession they followed with more proprietary non-backward-compatible bayonets.
From the consumer point of view, I'd say their inability to stick with anything and grow from there is what was their downfall.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
I had several Mamiya-Sekor E series lenses, never got to use them though as I was never able to find a working Z series body. The electronics in them are very unreliable.

I have a whole box full of of ZE / ZE-2 bodies (i got all of them together with lots of E/EF lenses, one or two ZMs and one working ZE-X for not too much money). When I got them maybe three years ago, i checked them all and found only one or two to be defective. Seems i should check them again; if you PM me your address, I can send you a working sample for free ...

Of course these ZE bodies were extremely cheap SLRs, but hey ... that was all my father could afford back then. The slides i made with our ZE when i was 12 y old were flawless, and lot's of nice memories were kept with that ZE (later replaced by a ZM). Maybe one year before buying my first Minolta 9000 i got the Sekor E 4/200mm and the 3.8/80-200mm zoom. While these lenses were comparatively cheap as well, they had well made metal barrels and a decent optical performance - certainly outperforming the Ilford HP5 I was using back then for shooting girls Wink

S


PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the very kind offer but today, the only mamiya lenses I own are an SX 2.8/28 in M42 and a few medium format lenses I dismantled and mounted the optics into shutters for use on my Century Graphic.

You used to be able to buy the Mamiya E series lenses for next to nothing, today, they seem to start at 25-30ukp, which is odd as there are so few uses for them other than shooting film on a Z series body.