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Kodak Ektar 127mm f4.7
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 7:13 am    Post subject: Kodak Ektar 127mm f4.7 Reply with quote

Does anyone have experience with this lens and can comment on sharpness and coverage.
I am under the impression that it is capable of 4X5 but is happiest with 6X9
OH


#1


PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 4:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have one just like that on my Speed Graphic. I love the color rendition and look of images. Unfortunately I only use it with 3x4 Polaroid so I don't know about the coverage. They were the stock lens on many 4x5 Speed Graphics.

Ektar 127 on Fuji FP100C Wide open at F4.7

Pete


PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 6:28 pm    Post subject: Ektar 127/4.7 Reply with quote

I have this lens on Polaroid 110 for film (rangefinder) - without tilt-shift. So it covers 4x5. But I don't know about tilt-shift. It is not very sharp - may be because of my habit to use this Polaroid without tripod.
Some pictures:



PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 127/4.7 Ektar is a normal lens for 3.25" x 4.25". It just covers 4x5, was the standard short normal lens for US press cameras from the mid-1940s to the end of 4x5 press cameras here.

There's also a 152/4.5 Ektar, same design, that covers 4x5 and then some and is a normal lens for 4x5.

I have a couple of 127 Ektars in so-so shutters, use a 127/4.7 Tominon in #1 Copal-Polaroid Press instead. I haven't tested hard but a 127/4.7 Ektar in good condition in a good shutter would never be a bad mistake if you want to shoot 4x5 without movements or a smaller format with.

Where f/4.5 tessar types fall down relative to equivalent f/5.6 plasmat types is in coverage. If much coverage isn't needed a tessar type is still a good choice.


PostPosted: Fri Aug 26, 2016 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks everyone for the feedback
I have found one of these and will try it out on 4X5 when it arrives
Cheers
OH


PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2016 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Judging by the letters on the front of serial #, it is 1946 production.
Perfect lens for reporters, they were shooting straight, without tilting and shifting on 4X5. Lens is slightly wide angle for this formate, taking a broad target, good for cropping.
All Ektars are superb!

The date deciphering for Ektars:

C-A-M-E-R-O-S-I-T-Y = 1-2-3-4-5-6-6-7-8-9-0


PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paulius wrote:
Judging by the letters on the front of serial #, it is 1946 production.
Perfect lens for reporters, they were shooting straight, without tilting and shifting on 4X5. Lens is slightly wide angle for this formate, taking a broad target, good for cropping.
All Ektars are superb!

The date deciphering for Ektars:

C-A-M-E-R-O-S-I-T-Y = 1-2-3-4-5-6-6-7-8-9-0


Thank you Paulius.
That is great to know
OH


PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You welcome, Oldhand!


PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since this discussion has come back to life, I'll take the opportunity to point out that the OP's lens is coated. The L in circle on the trim ring is short for Lumenized, EKCo-speak for coated.

EKCo started coating lenses for civilians sometime in 1946. Early '46 Ektars like my 101/4.5 aren't coated, late '46 Ektars like the OP's are.


PostPosted: Sun Jan 01, 2017 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

danfromm wrote:
Since this discussion has come back to life, I'll take the opportunity to point out that the OP's lens is coated. The L in circle on the trim ring is short for Lumenized, EKCo-speak for coated.

EKCo started coating lenses for civilians sometime in 1946. Early '46 Ektars like my 101/4.5 aren't coated, late '46 Ektars like the OP's are.


Many thanks Dan
OH


PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Coming back to Ektars, I have a similar 127mm, but f4,5 lens, the same 1946 year, made for Speed Graphic, no shutter, just an aperture with glass. I manage to mount it on Sony A7R2 with SLR bellow and tested it. As result it makes a very good pictures, comparable to good quality SLR 135 mm lenses. The sharpness is equal from corner to corner, slightly soft on open and perfect from f5,6 to 22. As a SLR full frame is a small fraction of 4X5 formate and 100% enlargement of FF gives a crisp and sharp image at all places of the frame, the lens is outstanding on large formate.

Last edited by Paulius on Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:14 pm; edited 4 times in total


PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2018 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The lens itself, the image taken on f5,6 and 100% crop of it:







PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding image circle, thus what sort of movements are possible, there's an easy way to determine this. If you have a room with a decent sized window on one side and a blank wall on the other, hold the lens up to the plain wall, moving it away from the wall until the image of the window is in focus. Observe the size of the circle that is illuminated. That's your image circle.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Ektar 127 f4,7 is press photographers lens, the circle just enough for the 4x5 frame , with almost no room for movements.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since this thread is coming back... I also use my Ektar 127 on my Nikon. Only have one Ektar so I need to swap it back and forth but that is not difficult.


Mine was the original lens on a 3x4 Speed Graphic and like Paulius, I don't think there is much image circle beyyond 4x6.

I also like the Wollensak Raptar 127. Both are great on Polaroid size but probably not for serious LF photography.
Pete


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is your bellow capable to do some movements? Looks like it can do left-right shift. Is it useful?
Actually it was a kit lens for Speed and Crown Graphic cameras.


Last edited by Paulius on Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:10 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks like a PB-4, so yes, it has movements, although it's pretty limited.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PB-6 on e-bay now, priced over $400.


PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 5:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My PB-4 can shift and tilt but I have not found it to be useful on 35mm format. I also have an older Bellows-1 that I use more because it is lighter and smaller. Because the bellows has no glass, an older Novoflex or off brand unit would work just as well. I would not pay $400 for any of them. Another option, B&H has a helicoid focusing unit that would do the same.
Pete


PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The simple one, similar as on my photo, but made in China, cost around $20.- on e-bay, ordered three.


PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 5:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paulius wrote:
PB-6 on e-bay now, priced over $400.


That's a looney tunes price. You can find PB-6s for cheaper than that if you're patient,

But with respect to movements, the PB-4 is the only Nikon Bellows that has movements. It is because of this unique capability with the PB-4 that you often see it selling for high prices.

I agree with Pete. I have a PB-4 and I don't see that it has much use with 35mm. Perhaps it will help with architectural disappearing points some, but it's a bellows, which means it'll be used for macro stuff, so I don't know how it would be useful for anything at larger scales unless a bellows lens is used.

The only bellows I know of that is meant for 35mm besides the PB-4 that has movements is the one built by Hama and marketed by Spiratione. I think they called it their Bellows Master or something. Here's a shot of mine with some rise, tilt and swing dialed in:



Note the lens. This is a 150mm bellows lens that has a big enough image circle where you could dial in some movements without the image being cut off. In contrast to the Pb-4, which has limited movements, these bellows have a full set of movements, same as a good view camera. You'll see them on eBay occasonionally, but people want a LOT for them when they show up there. I got mine for almost nothing when I bought a fellow's A-1 outfit.


PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps using the body of some disable Baby Graphic, connecting digital camera to the rear of it has a sense and could cost much less. Very Happy