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Getting Black Right (Monitor Cal)
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 12:56 pm    Post subject: Getting Black Right (Monitor Cal) Reply with quote

So problem.

I've never bothered worrying to much about getting colour right from monitor to monitor as I hardly print. If I do, I confess to taking it to my local stationary shop and using one of those automated touch print machines... Embarassed

Anyway just recently I was faffing about with an image, spending a bit of time getting the lower end of the contrast "to how I wanted it" only to see wildly different results from say my work PC to my home.

I would have thought brightness would be pretty easy to get right but it seems I have a varied idea of what brightness should be.

So, how can I be editing images correctly If they are going to look vastly different to anyone whom isn't sitting in front of my PC. How do you gals and guys check the brightness / contrast of an image? By you eye balling it on screen, or can you use the histogram to your advantage and check parts of the image to get an idea that there should be an obvious difference to whomever is viewing it.

Case in point is this image.

Click

I spent ages ensuring there was juuuuuust enough separation between the top of the subjects hair, and the dark hallway he was peering down. I've now looked at this on various monitors and not one looks as clear as it does here on my sh11ty dell.

How should I best go about controlling this?

Gracefully yours. Razz


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's way underexposed on my old Samsung monitor, which is calibrated with a Spyder.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First set brightness, then contrast, before setting black.

Many (most or all) LCD monitors are way brighter than any print. Setting the brightness first gives a reference point to the contrast range.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yep, massively underexposed!!


PostPosted: Mon Jan 04, 2016 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
First set brightness, then contrast, before setting black.

Many (most or all) LCD monitors are way brighter than any print. Setting the brightness first gives a reference point to the contrast range.


So really I'm thinking to hard about this, basic contrast / brightness adjustment will see me fine. Embarassed


PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tromboads wrote:
visualopsins wrote:
First set brightness, then contrast, before setting black.

Many (most or all) LCD monitors are way brighter than any print. Setting the brightness first gives a reference point to the contrast range.


So really I'm thinking to hard about this, basic contrast / brightness adjustment will see me fine. Embarassed


I misunderstood the question I think...I thought the end result was a print. For printing, the monitor brightness and contrast need reducing to match the paper. Monitors display is not so limited..

For display, all (I know) that can be done is to set the end of the right side of the histogram, letting the left side fall where it may -- since monitors vary greatly in brightness, the darker portions of the image will vary. There is no way (I know) to make the darker portions appear the same on most monitors.

All that is after setting the white balance, of course....

Somebody with more post processing experience can probably educate us more about how to...