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Do you use a monopod?
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 5:14 pm    Post subject: Do you use a monopod? Reply with quote

Hi there,
I do not have the more stable hands so I really rely to VR lenses to shoot my films.
For the cases that you are using a very slow film, like 100 and you still want to take that shot, will you think of using a monopod?
I find tripods to make you very slow moving around.
Perhaps a good monopod can still give you some flexibility in moving around?
Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2016 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I saw a special offer for one with case for IIRC 5....my opinion is:- they are not as good as a tripod but better than no camera support. One day I'll have to do some tests with\without but I would guess someone has already done this here.
But to answer your question... I have used a monopod a few times with a tele photo lens when the light wasn't good enough for a sharp shutter speed.


PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use them all the time, I have two, and my most used is an unbranded one - I think it might be an old Jessops or Cullman - that is 19 inch closed, with a Manfrotto monopod tilt head, and 61 inch extended, the best thing is that it has no flip catches or any sort of obstruction that stops it sliding through a leather belt loop, so it's very easy to carry, and quick to use. My belt loop / holster is home made but DIY stores sell similar ones for carrying hammers. It's so good that a friend wants one as well, but we just can't find one anywhere. I rarely go out without it and carry it for many miles, it's gained me a lot of pictures and worth the bother.
My other monopod is a Gitzo G1560 Walking pole with a tiny, but very firm, ball head that sits under a cover, this is much longer at 31 inch when collapsed so it's not as comfortable to carry in my belt loop. But if I'm walking off the main paths in hilly areas then this is the one I take.
I have been known to get a branch with a fork in it and use that as an extra leg, and I even push it into muddy ground and set the timer on the camera. These things have really saved a lot of pictures.

Gitzo at the front, unknown brand at the back with Manfrotto Monopod head.


I'm much slimmer in real life Laugh 1


PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dont use film cameras at the moment - but I do use monopods quite often.
I love the Monostat. It is no longer build as far as I know, but their special small foot is great. Furthermre this monopod does not bend as much as some lighter ones do.


PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2016 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't use one very often but they certainly help.
Using a 600mm lens on MFT 1200mm equivalent FOV I can't frame the image without support. With a bit of care & a well braced monopod the results are reasonable.
When the lens is mounted via a focal reducer or on a DSLR (900mm equiv.) I can just about manage to hand hold OK.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 14, 2016 2:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back in the day, when I was shooting slow slide emulsions almost exclusively, a monopod was a constant companion. I shot a lot of motorsports and often I was using long, slow lenses, so frequently shutter speeds were well below where they needed to be for any sort of hand-held work. I got to where I felt comfortable with using a monopod, and even got good at panning my subjects at slower speeds.

I prefer a monopod with a ball head. Right now, I have two -- a compact Gitzo and a Manfrotto-made Bogen. Most recently I attended a motorcycle race,where I used the Gitzo with my Tamron 300mm f/2.8 LDIF and NEX 7. The Gitzo is petite yet strong -- it easiliy handled that big Tamron lens. I shot "only" about a hundred pix that day, here are a few.









PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

which one will you suggest me buying today?
I have read somewhere that the monopod should reach your height.. and I am around 183cm.
I also have questions on what type of head it should have to make my life easier.
Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
I have read somewhere that the monopod should reach your height.. and I am around 183cm


I think it should be such height that you can stand so that your eye is about the height of the viewfinder, I usually bend my back and neck slightly using monopod.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2016 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
which one will you suggest me buying today?
I have read somewhere that the monopod should reach your height.. and I am around 183cm.
I also have questions on what type of head it should have to make my life easier.
Regards
Alex


My first monopod was designed to double as a hiking stick. It was so low I had to kneel down to use it, so it only got used once or twice & then more like a selfie stick than a monopod!

I would consider the advice on matching your height to be the minimum. As monopods are usually adjustable in length I would recommend getting one slightly too long rather than too short. Generally the most stable use of a monopod is not straight down but makeing a tripod with your legs, this makes a greater length a real advantage. If you end up shoot at an airshow or similar where the camera will be pointing up the extra length would be useful too. If you can find a solid one that will reach 1.9m I think that should be comfortable.

The shaft of the monopod can easily be rotated so the single axis head is not as daft as it would be on a tripod. If you don't expect to use it in portrait mode that would IMO be the ideal head. Many monopods come supplied with something similar.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks great answers. I am not sure it is easy to find a monopod that extends so high as my height. I think the heighest I found on the market was 175cm.

I will need something that would allow me to change its height fast and also to turn camera from vertical to horizontal.
Giving a budget of 100-300 dollars you can provide me suggestions if you like
Alex


PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manfrotto MMXPROA4 + Manfrotto 234RC should comply with your needs and is within your budget, even at the lower end.

I'm using Manfrotto since ages and I'm quite happy with their products; i.e. I never had troubles with them.


PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I mentioned previously in this thread, I have an old Gitzo -- a lightweight one, but still capable of handling like 25kg of weight -- and I have a Bogen, which was made by Manfroto back in the 80s.

My Gitzo looks like this one:

http://www.gitzo.us/series-2-carbon-6x-monopod-4-section-with-g-lock

I'm 6 ft tall, so its max extension of 63 inches is plenty for me -- once a head is mounted, you can add at least another 3 inches to the overall height.

The biggest problem with Gitzo, though, is the price. That little monopod probably sells for over $300 with no head. I bought mine at a camera show back in 1990 for $40. Even way back then, that was a great price. The guy didn't know what he had.

The Bogen I bought new back in the 80s. Great thing about Bogen was their products were made by Manfrotto -- excellent quality -- but they sold for very reasonable. I don't recall what I paid for my Bogen -- probably somewhere around $80. But as you can see from this eBay listing, they can be bought for cheap, and there's nothing in them that wears out:

Click here to see on Ebay

The Bogen extends to about the same height as the Gitzo.

I have a compact Stroboframe ball head I use on my Gitzo and a larger Bilora I use with my Bogen.

Last year I went to the big airshow here in Houston and I brought my Gitzo to use with my Tamron 300mm f/2.8 LDIF and NEX 7. I found it awkward to use when the aircraft were flying at higher elevations. When they flew low, it worked great. But for higher flyby's I often panned holding the big Tamron, with the monopod dangling in the air. I posted some photos earlier that I took at some local motorcycle races, in which I used the Gitzo with great results. It was made for that sort of application.

So, just sayin' that a monopod is not gonna work best in any number of situations. Neither is a tripod, for that matter. Sometimes you just gotta hold the outfit in your hands and hope for the best.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2016 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I'm using my monopod tonight (and saw the advert on the side) Well it extends to about 6ft although mine was cheaper it looks like this later one can do vertical shots which mine can't ...if you don't want to spend much money, I can't see why this https://www.7dayshop.com/products/7dayshop-2in1-monopod-duo-trek-multi-purpose-anti-shock-walking-pole-with-accessories-ds-044
couldn't be used for most of your shots.


PostPosted: Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a monopod which I use. Made in China and quite reasonably priced.
Most people think of using their monopod in an upright position, and this is of course the most common way to use it.
I have found that it can also be used in pseudo tripod manner by straddling it with my legs, like riding a broomstick, and holding it in place with downward pressure from my body.
My legs then become the other two legs of the tripod.
Sounds odd, but when you try it, it becomes quite comfortable.
Cheers
T


PostPosted: Mon Jan 16, 2017 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oldhand wrote:
Most people think of using their monopod in an upright position, and this is of course the most common way to use it.

I once came across a website that showed a collection of alternative was of supporting your camera with a monopod that were all far more stable than the vertical option. IIRC they originated in dark ages pole arm techniques.

If it's just to take the weight of a big lens vertical is OK, otherwise any of the other options I can remember work much better, but they can need a slightly longer monopod...


PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a " Duo-pod ".......which is a Tri-pod with TWO legs extended, sorta like the Previous description of a Mono-Pod where the Photog. , uses his legs to form the two other legs, mine is a Carbon fiber tripod, where One leg can be screwed off,mount on the Center-Column, to lenghten the whole thing, No need to buy X-tra stuff, Leaning on the Two Leggs , forming a Rigid Whole, Enabling me to shoot down to 1 (One) Sec. without " wobbling " .


PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

a monopod helps a lot in many circumstances. I still have one of the eldest Manfrotto monopods, bought back in 1992, that finds its place aside my backpack.

E.L.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
Oldhand wrote:
Most people think of using their monopod in an upright position, and this is of course the most common way to use it.

I once came across a website that showed a collection of alternative was of supporting your camera with a monopod that were all far more stable than the vertical option. IIRC they originated in dark ages pole arm techniques.

If it's just to take the weight of a big lens vertical is OK, otherwise any of the other options I can remember work much better, but they can need a slightly longer monopod...


Quite interesting I studied extensively medieval weapons (blades though).

I would be happy to see the contraptions you are mentioning.

I might thing of a spike but this would work only on soil.