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Bessa RF Ilford B&W
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 5:28 pm    Post subject: Bessa RF Ilford B&W Reply with quote

I don't think so I ever put B&W film again into my cameras.




It's super duper crap compare with color version.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shots are in good focus, but agree, your slide stuff is way much better!


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uh, it is not really that bad, if you repair the poor processing that caused air bubble spots near the top, and correct contrast and brightness:



For starters, the picture is quite ok - a bit on the oldfashioned side, but it doesn't harm to learn how to do that.

A suitable filter to bring out the brightness of the strip of plants from the right to the center would have improved it considerably, and a position a few meters closer to the pile of rocks, to have a more dominant foreground object, might have given it the final touch.

B&W landscape will usually need filters (anywhere between green and red) to control the rendition of different coloured parts of terrain, and you have to aquire a feeling for the balance between light and dark after the colour is gone but that will come with a few rolls - and these days, you can accelerate the process for free, by testing your software b&w conversion skills on your existing colour images.

Sevo


Last edited by Sevo on Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:44 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey , great result Sevo! I think B&W good for me only for some selected moment from people like Cosmin doing or some dramatic HDR photos like Simon's doing.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great results, Sevo, that is a vast improvement! Today I load Provia 100F
in my Bessa.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I look forward result !


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, it takes 10-12 days just to get it processed as opposed to film negs,
that take 5 days. The 120 negs are only $0.84 to get developed as opposed
to $4.88 for the slides, but still way cheaper than the place I used before.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have time to wait no problem I would see some colorful autumn photos with blue sky if possible.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm hoping for better autumn colors by the weekend, at least I hope so.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
Hey , great result Sevo! I think B&W good for me only for some selected moment from people like Cosmin doing or some dramatic HDR photos like Simon's doing.


If you like the tonal separation that exist in the location, meter at Zone 5.

If the center of the subject is a bit dark, Zona 4. If it haven't detail, zone 3. It's difficult use zone 3, generally use zona 4 for the darkest zone.

Skin of white man and similars tonal rendition, zona 6. Snow and very sunny location, zone 7.

If the sky is important in the pic, when you expose to the shadows, control that not overexpose the sky. To darken sky, orange or red filter.

It's an incomplete summary of my experience in B&W.

Glosary: Zone 5 - meter reading
6- open 1
7- open 2
4- close 1
3-close 2

Rino.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rino, Ansel is smiling down upon you from the heavens. Wink


PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Katastrofo wrote:
Rino, Ansel is smiling down upon you from the heavens. Wink


Of course it's an horrific simplification of Ansel method, but for streets and diary pics was useable for me. Specially in street pics with incident read (zone 5).

Rino.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With b&w more than color, photographers would do the m thing... you know, manipulation... to improve on what comes naturally. This includes the filters in front of the lens as well as chemistry and light play that come towards the back.

Don't be discouraged.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 2008 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nesster wrote:
With b&w more than color, photographers would do the m thing... you know, manipulation... to improve on what comes naturally. This includes the filters in front of the lens as well as chemistry and light play that come towards the back.


yes. I prefer the pre to the postprod. In the postprod prefer do this at the laboratory (burning, etc) to the digital ones, it's more craft for me. But when the important is the message, all the ways are valid, endeed.

Rino.