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Basic techniques to repair lenses (and cameras)
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would like to repair some of my Zuiko lenses - first 50/1.8, after some practising 50/1.2. I havent done anything like that before.

I pretend i would need a spanner wrench, some screwdivers, something to grab lenses with, some finger gloves? For start, just basic tools.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any recommendation on where can I buy/how to make myself the lens unscrewing tubes?


PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

berraneck wrote:
I would like to repair some of my Zuiko lenses - first 50/1.8, after some practising 50/1.2. I havent done anything like that before.

I pretend i would need a spanner wrench, some screwdivers, something to grab lenses with, some finger gloves? For start, just basic tools.


Right, you would need a spanner wrench and/or rubber cups to disassemble the lenses.
I don't use finger gloves, just full latex or vinyl gloves (for the whole hand).
And some vacuum cups to lift the lenses.

Regards.

Jes.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dainiuss wrote:
Any recommendation on where can I buy/how to make myself the leClick here to see on Ebayns unscrewing tubes?


difficult to say now. Alex (Hk300) is not anymore available, and he was who provided mines.
In the past I used to go to the harware stores and ask for the rubber plugs that are used to end the metal tube legs on some chairs.

I found these, that look better than the ones from India:

Click here to see on Ebay

But no experience with them.

Also found these rubber cups (also no experience with them) The seller seems to have them in several different diameters.

Click here to see on Ebay

Good Luck!

Regards.
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some spanners from Micro Tools: Not so cheap, but look nice:

Micro Tools Spanners

Regards.

Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also from Micro Tools there is a nice Lens Ring Tool Set

Here is the one set that fits most common lens rings leaving the center clear for the glass portion of the lens. Sizes are 13, 19, 21, 24, 29, 30, 36, 37, 44, 45, 54 & 62mm:




(BTW, I'm not related in any way to Micro Tools, just found them as an alternative to the MFLenses tools, and thought it could be useful for the colleagues )

Regards.

Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a set of those spanners, Jesito, and I do not recommend them. Not only are they way overpriced, but those interchangeable tips slip out of place and move around. The result is a scarred lens element or front ring -- or both. If you insist on using one of those sets, be very careful with it. It works well only if the ring is not very tight.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
I have a set of those spanners, Jesito, and I do not recommend them. Not only are they way overpriced, but those interchangeable tips slip out of place and move around. The result is a scarred lens element or front ring -- or both. If you insist on using one of those sets, be very careful with it. It works well only if the ring is not very tight.


Thanks for your comment, Michael!!
No, I'm not really wishing to use them, just looking for alternatives to the nice ones provided in the past by our colleague HK300, unfortunately missing since long.

Any feedback (in any sense) for any of the tools will be very appreciated!

Regards.
Jes.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your links Jesito, indeed very helpful!


PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 3:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dainiuss wrote:
Thanks for your links Jesito, indeed very helpful!


You are welcome!.

Jes.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 6:20 pm    Post subject: Repaint Reply with quote

Great Thread !

I have taken apart quite a few old lenses with varying results but one thing I havnt been able to figure out is how to repaint the numbers and lines?

I want to repaint quite a few lenses were the color is almost or even completely gone.

What kind of paint is normally used or could be used?

There are probably new kinds of paint that might work better then the old ones?


PostPosted: Wed Nov 24, 2010 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Assuming the numbers are recessed and not silkscreened onto the lens, I've heard of it done the following way:

Buy model airplane enamel paint in the small bottles in the colors you need.

Using the tip of a toothpick, first clean out the number or line "grooves" with alcohol to remove all traces of dirt and grime. Let the alcohol evaporate.

Using the tip of another toothpick, dip it into the paint and push the paint into the number or line grooves. Dip a cotton swab into paint thinner, and wipe across the lens body or part over the number or line grooves, then wipe clean with a paper towel. If necessary, add a bit of paint thinner to the paper towel and wipe over the lens body or part again.

You should have wet paint down into the number grooves now and the excess traces of paint should have been removed with the cotton swab and paper towel. Let the paint dry.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Assuming the numbers are recessed and not silkscreened onto the lens, I've heard of it done the following way:

Buy model airplane enamel paint in the small bottles in the colors you need.


Thanx for the tip.

Im not sure airplane hobby paint is what I would like to use though Smile Not unless there is a more "authentic" way.
What do the professionals use?
What kind of paint was Nikon, Canon and others using "yesterday" and what are they using today? Maybe they too use hobby paint but I have read somewere that they atleast used to use some kind of wax-like paint that was first heated up so it melted, then poored into the recessed numbers and any paint leftovers were simply wiped of.

Any ideas?


PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject: Used to holiday with my family at Estartit Reply with quote

Jesito

Many thanks for a very thorough primer on repair!

You live in a very beautiful part of the world!

Pat


PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

aliasant wrote:

Im not sure airplane hobby paint is what I would like to use though Smile Not unless there is a more "authentic" way.
What do the professionals use?


You can get matte and glossy black paint from camera repair material suppliers. Beyond that, the said model paints are the only ones that exist in tiny packages and a wide variety of colours and surfaces, so essentially it boils down to Revell for professionals as well.

In the past, manufacturers used pretty much the same (solvent/alkyd) paint type - but sprayed onto the bare, pre-etched metal, dried in a cleanroom and heat cured.

Now that industrial paint processes are generally using technologies not applicable at workshop level (like powder coating or electrophoresis), there is no question of using "original paints" any more - current paints cannot be applied in touch-up repairs.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@aliasant: As already explained by the other members above, enamel model paints are your best - and probably only - option for the particular task.
I've also seen white paint offered on *Bay for touching up white-coloured Canon teles, this is enamel paint as well.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent!

Thank you all for great info.
Now I have bought some basic colors and will start experimenting.

Often when I get a beatup old lens I take it all apart. Then clean every mechanical part on its own with a toothbrush and a couple of different solvents to get rid of everything. Sometimes colors gets lost too so now, if this works, I dont have to worry that much about colors anymore Smile

First up might be my ENNA Lithagon 35 2.8. A great oldie with character.

Thanx again for setting me on the right path!


PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 1:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some new (to me) methods that have worked for me recently.

- To loosen tight screws, two other things to try -

1. Use a soldering iron to heat the screw head for about 1 minute. The differential heat expansion of the screw may break the thread free. This is about 50% effective in my experience of the last month or so.

2. Put the right screwdriver in the screw slot (use the right one to avoid marring the head) and strike it sharply a few times with something not too heavy; again, this may break the thread free. I have a PK mount Cosina 60-300 zoom lens thats been sitting around for two years with a stuck aperture and I had to get the mount off to fix it, but all four screws were stuck hard. This freed them all, and now the lens is repaired. This method has the potential for doing damage though, so be careful.

- To assemble aperture leaves on preset or manual aperture lenses - these have numerous curved blades that overlap and are hard to position accurately, or rather its very difficult to position new blades without moving the ones you have already placed.

The latest method, straight from John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John - Grease is the Word ! It sounds like its adding to the problem but it works better than little clamps, etc.

Put a little grease on each blade as you place it on each hole in the bottom ring. This holds the blades together and they move around less as you begin to insert blades under the ones you have already laid. If you use enough grease all the blades even stay together as one unit.

Once the mechanism is reassembled and fixed in place, flush it with lighter fluid (naptha) until most of it is gone. There should be a little grease on the blades of a preset aperture lens, but none on those of a shutter, so be careful in those cases, you need to get all the grease off without contaminating the shutter blades.


PostPosted: Sat Nov 05, 2011 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, I need to disassemble OM ZUIKO 50mm and Vivitar 135mm f2.8, I found this tools, what do you think, are they going to be good.

Link: http://www.ebay.com/itm/38-1-Screw-Driver-Tool-kit-Set-helicopter-Precision-/270814992426?pt=Radio_Control_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3f0dd4d82a


PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info.

Last edited by hoanpham on Fri May 25, 2012 10:14 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:
ZoneV wrote:
I worked with a spanner wrench at work and was dissapointed.
My modified big old caliper was much better - here are some pictures of it:

It is big enoug for all the lenses I open Very Happy

For some tasks I use a part of a bicycle tube. The rubber is good to open some filter rings. But I still need something like those rubbers you mentioned.

For flash capacitor draining I build a adjustable resistor with high voltag cables - but I think there are better commercial devices to buy - for less money.

I use Wiha PicoFinish Phillips screwdrivers.


Thanks for the info!. The caliper mod is a sound idea... I think I have a spare one to try Wink The benefit is the big handle that will provide a good push.

To discharge capacitors, I built this unit that is very effective:



The diodes provide a fixed voltage to the LEDs that light whilst there is energy stored in the capacitor. The resistor R1 has to be able of disipating 5 Watt or more...

Regards.
Jes.

Nice idea. But that resistor is needless to be as much as 5W. The energy stored in a such capacitor found in flashes isn't enough to even heat up an 0,5W resistor. The only consideration you have to count with is the maximum voltage that the resistor has to handle. Because of this, a 1-2W one is recommended, these bigger in size ones will surely handle that 300V. And another upgrade: Common zener diodes around 2-3V (the sum of the 4x1n400x) are able to handle the current limited by R1 easily, so if available, it's much easier to put two of them in series connected by the same end of them together. This will form a zener+normal diode voltage drop in each direction and with the resistor sized down, makes the whole curcuit much more compact, enabling easier handling and accessing of the flash capacitor without unnecessairy steps.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

didyman wrote:
Jesito wrote:
ZoneV wrote:
I worked with a spanner wrench at work and was dissapointed.
My modified big old caliper was much better - here are some pictures of it:
http://www.4photos.de/camera-diy/kamera-reparatur-werkzeug.html
It is big enoug for all the lenses I open Very Happy

For some tasks I use a part of a bicycle tube. The rubber is good to open some filter rings. But I still need something like those rubbers you mentioned.

For flash capacitor draining I build a adjustable resistor with high voltag cables - but I think there are better commercial devices to buy - for less money.

I use Wiha PicoFinish Phillips screwdrivers.


Thanks for the info!. The caliper mod is a sound idea... I think I have a spare one to try Wink The benefit is the big handle that will provide a good push.

To discharge capacitors, I built this unit that is very effective:



The diodes provide a fixed voltage to the LEDs that light whilst there is energy stored in the capacitor. The resistor R1 has to be able of disipating 5 Watt or more...

Regards.
Jes.

Nice idea. But that resistor is needless to be as much as 5W. The energy stored in a such capacitor found in flashes isn't enough to even heat up an 0,5W resistor. The only consideration you have to count with is the maximum voltage that the resistor has to handle. Because of this, a 1-2W one is recommended, these bigger in size ones will surely handle that 300V. And another upgrade: Common zener diodes around 2-3V (the sum of the 4x1n400x) are able to handle the current limited by R1 easily, so if available, it's much easier to put two of them in series connected by the same end of them together. This will form a zener+normal diode voltage drop in each direction and with the resistor sized down, makes the whole curcuit much more compact, enabling easier handling and accessing of the flash capacitor without unnecessairy steps.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome DIYMan!


PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I want to bump this thread by asking a simple question.
Can i find this tools on the internet?
I have a nice set of screwdrivers (i've opened my 50D and 20D several times and repaired my 18-55 IS Very Happy) but i don't have any of those special tools for disassembling a lens.
I'm talking about those rubber stuff and spanner wrench. Any indication about where i can buy such tools?


PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks for topicstarter for information Smile

I have a small question: did anyone use Wiha tools? For example, such a Wiha 26199 Slotted and Phillips Screwdriver Set