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Wide angle macro - How did he do it
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I talked to him, he is unwilling to even give a hint.
I doubt that a wide angle with small ext. tube will
do - no animal would stay put and have such a monster
come close to it to a few centimeters/inches, since
that would be needed for that effect (tried it of course).


PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

just a thought:
couldn't he have just used a campact digital camera with wideangle-macro function. One can go very close to subjects and the small sensor boost DoF a lot (like shown in the phptographs). Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes

Cheers
Tobias


PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

5000x4000 pix resolution???


PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
5000x4000 pix resolution???


Oh god, I haven't seen that ... Shocked

Cheers
Tobias


PostPosted: Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2400x2400 bekomme ich hin, immerhin.


PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Klaus, I did some strange experimeting today:





I'll post a explaination later how this is done ...


Cheers
Tobias


PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Astonishing. Looks like you found a way. Congrats!

Thomas


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow.. the picture are so stunning.. Nice job all of you have...


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding "Deep Focus Lens":

It is generally believed that it was the invention of a well-known Australian cinematographer (whose name escaped me); he was a regular at a professional dealer down the road from me and bought a lot of old lenses, which he disassembled and played with the optics, and somehow made an arrangement which he patented; he used it for a lot of his wildlife documentaries and they caused quite a sensation: in fact a lot of people in other countries were disuaded to visit: "the caterpillars in Australia are a metre long and spiders the size of turkeys!"


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hee hee, and then he (Frazier btw. is his name) lost the patent case since
the court found out that he had cheated and presented falsified
documents / prof for his claim. What a shame, since the lens really
works quite well and Panavision still rents them quite often.

More here about the "Frazier Lens"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frazier_lens

...mounted on RED One:



PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2009 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tobbsman wrote:

I'll post a explaination later how this is done ...


Tobias it will be very exciting to hear at least which direction to dig in order to achieve such a result. Could you please share some info?


PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2009 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tobias has already explained his setup, but in another thread. Here:
http://forum.mflenses.com/the-sexiest-mf-lens-t21879.html

He used if I remeber correctly:
- Kenko 8mm fisheye adaptor (which projects its image into infinity)
- 28mm relay lens (actually the Kenko and this lens count as one lens together, since the image is not inverted)
- 2x macro adaptor (I guess to magnify the image enough to cover the sensor area in full)

Obviously only the central part of the Kenko fisheye is being used, which is good since that lens has quite a bit of CA the further one approaches the frame of its image.

Was that correct Tobias?


Last edited by kds315* on Fri Nov 13, 2009 3:39 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for the delay, I was a few days away Wink


Quote:
Was that correct Tobias?


Thanks Klaus, this is 100% correct !

Cheers
Tobias


PostPosted: Tue Dec 01, 2009 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
hee hee, and then he (Frazier btw. is his name) lost the patent case since
the court found out that he had cheated and presented falsified
documents / prof for his claim. What a shame, since the lens really
works quite well and Panavision still rents them quite often.

More here about the "Frazier Lens"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frazier_lens


http://www.patenthawk.com/blog/2005/08/inequitable_depth_of_field.html
What a tool! Why on Earth he didn't use his own lens, I don't understand, unless it wasn't ready at the time.


PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got this from another forum:

http://niallbenvie.churchilljohnson.co.uk/blog/?p=3184


PostPosted: Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi all, thanks for this informative post!

i am curious to know what solutions there are to do this on a Canon 5D2 easily?

as i am aware, the vivitar macro converters come in KA, MC/MD, FD and some other mounts?, but not M42 (or some other convertable mount to Canon EF).. are there any other options available?

i'd love to be able to play around with this!

thanks!


PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I now understand how it works Smile





PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.geo.de/GEO/info/newsletter/abo/54620.html

direct link to photo http://www.geo.de/GEO/info/newsletter/abo/54620.html?t=img&p=2

This photo shows the artist himself lying on his back in a field, sporting a Nikon D2x with the focusing switch set to C as in Continuous, for moving subjects. Lens in photo is a 60/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor with the Nikon R1C1 Macro flash system, consisting of a Nikon SU-800 wireless commander, some ring adapters and 3 Nikon SB-R200 macro flash units.

A lot of his photos look like they were taken with a fisheye lens though, looking at the horizon.


PostPosted: Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spotmatic wrote:
I now understand how it works Smile



Nice!
How did you do it?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 13, 2010 12:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have tested a wideangle lens (Samyang 14mm) and some extension.
http://www.4photos.de/test/Super-Wide-Close-Up.jpg
But while shooting a wasp on some flower I recognized that the wasp was on my lens surface. It didnt stopped the searching of the flower. The image quality is good, but with tha lens you do not get small objekts big enough.

I have testes a endoscope too. There the image quality was not good, and it needs very much light. I took some images with a flash with full power (LZ 30 --> Guide number ~ 90 feet) directly in 10 cm distance to the main object.

I think the best variable option it that with the relay lens system.
My first tests are with a C-Mount Zoom lens and the Kiron 105/2.8 as a relay lens. That was not so good.
First two images here:
http://www.4photos.de/camera-diy/objektiv-format-adaption.html
One on a German photo froum made tests with a smaller fixed focal length CCTV lens:
http://www.dslr-forum.de/showthread.php?t=740279

I think a better lens would help, his lens was a relative cheap CCTV lens, not even for megapixel cameras reccomended. But there are only few high resolution C-Mount or M12 mount wideangles around for ~ 2/3" sensors.


PostPosted: Sat Jul 21, 2012 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have experimented with this too. I guess there are several ways to achieve similar results. Here is what I got today. The DOF can be increased more, but it was very windy so I wanted to keep my shutter speed high.

*****



*****



*****



*****

The magnification is about 1:4-1:3 (quarter to one-third life size)


Last edited by Alex H on Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:15 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How did he do it?

If you look through his site, watch the slide show, etc., there are all kinds of different styles of shots. For one, IMO a lot of what we see is just cropping. He crops to a 16x9 format, which with any of the FX Nikon bodies, like the D3x and D800E, would be easy. It also appears (to my eyes) that a number of the specimens are dead. And there are a lot of movement in those that are not. There is a lot of stuff out-of-focus, for sure.

If I were to want to do this, I would shoot mini-panoramas, with one to a few shots, panned left to right, and stitched. The Nikkor PC lenses (in shift mode) are idea for this, but any good panorama head will do. That would be the ticket.

As for the near and far aspect, I would have to experiment with that a bit. I dont have the answer for that one, but shooting a short stack would help, a couple of shots very close and some background shots in high focus and then stack them. This would require considerable retouching.

I am taking nothing away from the (rather few actually) shots that are miraculous, but with good technique and a little luck, great things happen? We all get lucky sometimes.

Since the topic is How did he do it?, that is my two cents. Very nice.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Not his style, I agree. More my style, but in some ways similar. Michael


PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I quite doubt that stacking methods were used nor were the animals dead. At least they don't look like to me. I'd rather think about a clever use of wide angle and fisheye lenses with a clever relay lens system, which is not new at all but has been done in scientific nature filming.

There is a japanese company offering such systems, I'll see where I have a link, as they show examples which quite look the ones shown.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not suggesting typical stacking, but simply some front and back shots combined. Since we don't know how he did it, all we can say is how we would do it.

The shot of the unicorn-type beetle does not look live. Neither does the Click Beetle.

Explain please about what relay lenses are and can do.