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Which M39 adapter?
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 4:51 am    Post subject: Which M39 adapter? Reply with quote

I've seen two kinds of in eBay, very different priced...

Click here to see on Ebay
Click here to see on Ebay

With severe size differences....
Any light on this?
Thanks in advance,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:20 am    Post subject: Re: Which M39 adapter? Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:
I've seen two kinds of in eBay, very different priced...

Click here to see on Ebay
Click here to see on Ebay

With severe size differences....
Any light on this?
Thanks in advance,
Jes.


The Visoflex is a particular system that transforms the Leica M rangefinder cameras into reflex cameras by adding a mirror and focusing screen into a tube.
By consequence, special lenses were produced that feature only the front elements of the regular M lenses.
The mount is always M39 but everything else including the register distance is totally different. This explains the different shape (and price).
The first adapter is for M39 reflex Russian lenses which have a different register distance than both the regular Leica M39 and the Visoflex.
The Russian M39 are compatible with infinity focus on EOS cameras as long as the adapter is of the proper lenght.
You can also do what many other people do, that is, to buy a M39-M42 stepup ring and apply it to the lens, and then use a M42 to EOS adapter. If the stepup ring is not longer than the threaded mount on the lens, this should also ensure infinity focus. This way, you can also use the advantage of a chipped M42-EOS adapter.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:32 am    Post subject: Re: Which M39 adapter? Reply with quote

Orio wrote:

You can also do what many other people do, that is, to buy a M39-M42 stepup ring and apply it to the lens, and then use a M42 to EOS adapter. If the stepup ring is not longer than the threaded mount on the lens, this should also ensure infinity focus. This way, you can also use the advantage of a chipped M42-EOS adapter.


Orio, many thanks for this detailed explanation, I'll be looking for the m39-m42 adaptor, since I've got a spare m42-EOS one.
Best regards,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Additional question:

Is the Leica-R the same as the M39 screw?.

Thanks in advance,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:
Additional question:
Is the Leica-R the same as the M39 screw?.
Thanks in advance,
Jes.


No, the so called "Leica M39" threaded mount is on the Leica rangefinder lenses (the Leica rangefinder cameras with removeable lenses have a M39 threaded mount and are labeled "Mx", like, M1, M2 etc. Current model is the digital rangefinder M8 ).
The Leica R mount is a bayonet mount and is made for the Leica reflex cameras, which are labeled "Rx"
Of course the register distance is completely different. The Leica R lenses are fully compatible with Canon EOS and digital Olympus reflex cameras, while the Leica M lenses, obviously, are not - you can still mount a Leica M lens on a EOS body using a M39 adapter (or M42 + stepup ring), but because of the different register distance, you will be able to use the lens only for macro (you will not have focus to infinite).


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:

No, the so called "Leica M39" threaded mount is on the Leica rangefinder lenses (the Leica rangefinder cameras with removeable lenses have a M39 threaded mount and are labeled "Mx", like, M1, M2 etc. Current model is the digital rangefinder M8 ).
The Leica R mount is a bayonet mount and is made for the Leica reflex cameras, which are labeled "Rx"
Of course the register distance is completely different. The Leica R lenses are fully compatible with Canon EOS and digital Olympus reflex cameras, while the Leica M lenses, obviously, are not - you can still mount a Leica M lens on a EOS body using a M39 adapter (or M42 + stepup ring), but because of the different register distance, you will be able to use the lens only for macro (you will not have focus to infinite).


Thanks, Orio, that makes it clear for me!.
Best regards,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:
Additional question:

Is the Leica-R the same as the M39 screw?.

Thanks in advance,
Jes.


Just to add a little more info, the Russian (M39) thread for early Zenit cameras is a true metric thread 39mm dia x 1mm pitch. The Leica (LTM) thread has a slightly different pitch - 39mm dia x 26 threads per inch (there are 25.4mm to an inch). Mostly for short length threads the difference isn't a problem, but after so many turns the thread will bind, which could prevent infinity focus.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

peterqd wrote:
Jesito wrote:
Additional question:

Is the Leica-R the same as the M39 screw?.

Thanks in advance,
Jes.


Just to add a little more info, the Russian (M39) thread for early Zenit cameras is a true metric thread 39mm dia x 1mm pitch. The Leica (LTM) thread has a slightly different pitch - 39mm dia x 26 threads per inch (there are 25.4mm to an inch). Mostly for short length threads the difference isn't a problem, but after so many turns the thread will bind, which could prevent infinity focus.


Thanks Peter, I think I'll limit my adapters to the Leica-R by now. There are many offers of nice Leica optics around... But at high prices.
Best regards,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:

Thanks Peter, I think I'll limit my adapters to the Leica-R by now. There are many offers of nice Leica optics around... But at high prices.
Best regards,
Jes.


Yes, Leica optics are usually the most expensive. And not all of them are really worth the huge price difference with other top quality lenses such as Contax Olympus or Nikkor.
Some of them, however, offer absolutely unparalleled top performance.

I have two favourites amongst them and they are the Elmarit-R 35mm last version, and the Elmarit-R 135 last version.
These are the Leica lenses I would buy first if I had to buy them again.

An "easy" start (price-wise) can be the Summicron-R 50, that is good in both version (older and newer).

For portraits, however, I would choose the Summicron-R 90.

A general advice with Leica lenses, be very careful with the different versions. Sometimes the older lenses are as good as the newer (a case is the 50mm), but sometimes the difference in quality is huge. For instance, the 35mm Elmarit first version is reported to be of not more than average quality, while the last version is considered one of the best Leica lenses ever. The same goes more or less also for the Elmarit-R 90 and Elmarit-R 135.
The Summicron-R 90 instead is always the same optics in spite of external differences in the versions, so any version of this lens is ok.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Jesito wrote:

Thanks Peter, I think I'll limit my adapters to the Leica-R by now. There are many offers of nice Leica optics around... But at high prices.
Best regards,
Jes.


Yes, Leica optics are usually the most expensive. And not all of them are really worth the huge price difference with other top quality lenses such as Contax Olympus or Nikkor.
Some of them, however, offer absolutely unparalleled top performance.

I have two favourites amongst them and they are the Elmarit-R 35mm last version, and the Elmarit-R 135 last version.
These are the Leica lenses I would buy first if I had to buy them again.

An "easy" start (price-wise) can be the Summicron-R 50, that is good in both version (older and newer).

For portraits, however, I would choose the Summicron-R 90.

A general advice with Leica lenses, be very careful with the different versions. Sometimes the older lenses are as good as the newer (a case is the 50mm), but sometimes the difference in quality is huge. For instance, the 35mm Elmarit first version is reported to be of not more than average quality, while the last version is considered one of the best Leica lenses ever. The same goes more or less also for the Elmarit-R 90 and Elmarit-R 135.
The Summicron-R 90 instead is always the same optics in spite of external differences in the versions, so any version of this lens is ok.


Thanks for the info, Orio.
That Summicron-R 90 is one of my targets. I miss a lens of that focal length, and everybody is praising it... Only the price is a little frightening, between 400 and 500 used, around 2000 new...

Best regards,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:

Thanks for the info, Orio.
That Summicron-R 90 is one of my targets. I miss a lens of that focal length, and everybody is praising it... Only the price is a little frightening, between 400 and 500 used, around 2000 new...
Best regards,
Jes.


I suggest you to buy something cheaper in the meantime (like a Jupiter-9 which is 85mm f/2 and usually goes for 50-70 Euros) and then wait for a good occasion on a Summicron-R 90.
The secret to save money on Leicas is to never hurry, but wait for the good occasion. I bought my Summicron-R 90 for 300 Euros including UPS shipment, and it was a like-new copy, with box and paperworks. So it is possible to save on Leicas, if you are able to wait.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Jesito wrote:

Thanks for the info, Orio.
That Summicron-R 90 is one of my targets. I miss a lens of that focal length, and everybody is praising it... Only the price is a little frightening, between 400 and 500 used, around 2000 new...
Best regards,
Jes.


I suggest you to buy something cheaper in the meantime (like a Jupiter-9 which is 85mm f/2 and usually goes for 50-70 Euros) and then wait for a good occasion on a Summicron-R 90.
The secret to save money on Leicas is to never hurry, but wait for the good occasion. I bought my Summicron-R 90 for 300 Euros including UPS shipment, and it was a like-new copy, with box and paperworks. So it is possible to save on Leicas, if you are able to wait.


I see... At the brand new prices, I would be better buying a full-fram digital camera...
On the other hand, the Jupiter-9 is already in my active seek list. I've seen several in eBay, just waiting for the end of auctions...

Thanks!
Best regards,
Jes.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesito wrote:

I see... At the brand new prices, I would be better buying a full-fram digital camera...


Well, unless you are either a professional, or a true quality maniac amateur, I can't see the reason why to spend a fortune on the brand new APO-Summicron-R 90 (the only Summicron-R 90 still in production), while a 300 Euros used "normal" Summicron can make pictures that are just as good, maybe only discernible from the APO model in certain shooting situations and by pixel-peeping.


PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Jesito wrote:

I see... At the brand new prices, I would be better buying a full-fram digital camera...


Well, unless you are either a professional, or a true quality maniac amateur, I can't see the reason why to spend a fortune on the brand new APO-Summicron-R 90 (the only Summicron-R 90 still in production), while a 300 Euros used "normal" Summicron can make pictures that are just as good, maybe only discernible from the APO model in certain shooting situations and by pixel-peeping.


You're right, Orio. I only buy used MF lenses... I was taking it to the extreme.

I meant just what you have stated: It makes no sense to me to spend a lot of money on a superlens when you can buy much more useful equipment for the same amount...

I don't need (yet Wink) a full-frame camera. I'm very happy with my small 350D, specially seeing what people like veijoo can do with it. It will take me a lot of time to reach the limits of my camera, for sure.

Best regards,
Jes.