Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

What is black and white reversal process?
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 11:49 pm    Post subject: What is black and white reversal process? Reply with quote

Hi,
I had a a look on the wikipedia about the black and white reversal process? It seems that these are not my Ilford HP5 type of films but some negatives that print negative colors directly on the film or something.

Can you perhaps give me some simple example for that?

Regards
A


PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 1:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

See http://www.ilfordphoto.com/applications/page.asp?n=90 found by searching https://www.google.com/search?q=black+and+white+reversal+process&rlz=1C1CHFX_enUS570US570&oq=black+and+white+reversal+process&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8

Phil


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 12:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ALEX DON'T GO THERE!

edit: reversal film is slide film. B&W reversal film is exactly that - black and white slides, colour reversal is colour slide film. You could reverse process B&W neg films... see the rest of my post. End of edit

I have tried it and its messy, expensive and uses hard to get (nowadays) chemicals and with unpredictable and usually crap results. You can't buy films of this type any more you need too process slow speed films to reverse them. I have developed countless b&w and colour films and made thousands of darkroom prints on paper, glass, metal, film and cloth. But I would balk at doing b&W reversal again. And don't think that you can push process HP5 and reverse it too.

To be honest, B&W reversal films were for people who wanted high quality b&w slides. Why do you want b&W slides? Digitise them and you may as well digitise from a negative.

Have you developed your first film yet?

edit 2: If developing a film is like making a cup of tea, then reverse processing is like making a pan galactic gargleblaster (http://hitchhikers.wikia.com/wiki/Pan_Galactic_Gargle_Blaster)


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
ALEX DON'T GO THERE!

edit: reversal film is slide film. B&W reversal film is exactly that - black and white slides, colour reversal is colour slide film. You could reverse process B&W neg films... see the rest of my post. End of edit

I have tried it and its messy, expensive and uses hard to get (nowadays) chemicals and with unpredictable and usually crap results. You can't buy films of this type any more you need too process slow speed films to reverse them. I have developed countless b&w and colour films and made thousands of darkroom prints on paper, glass, metal, film and cloth. But I would balk at doing b&W reversal again. And don't think that you can push process HP5 and reverse it too.

To be honest, B&W reversal films were for people who wanted high quality b&w slides. Why do you want b&W slides? Digitise them and you may as well digitise from a negative.

Have you developed your first film yet?

edit 2: If developing a film is like making a cup of tea, then reverse processing is like making a pan galactic gargleblaster

(http://hitchhikers.wikia.com/wiki/Pan_Galactic_Gargle_Blaster)



What happened to this film ?

http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?28733-Kodak-invent-worlds-Fastest-film!


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excalibur wrote:
What happened to this film ? http://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?28733-Kodak-invent-worlds-Fastest-film!


what happened to Kodak? They made the first digital camera, perfected the sensor and licensed it out to everyone. Suicide.


Last edited by philslizzy on Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:40 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Didnt AGFA have a reversal B+W film?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

how did they make b&w movies?

was it reversed during the master-copy -phase?
but how did they cut the films?


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
what happened to Kodak? They made the first digital camera, perfected the sensor and licensed it out to everyone. Suicide.


Kodak actually made a b&w digital camera too, years before Leica

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/kodak-760m.shtml


PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trev wrote:
Didnt AGFA have a reversal B+W film?


this, 32ASA probably too slow for Alex



kansalliskala wrote:
how did they make b&w movies?

was it reversed during the master-copy -phase?
but how did they cut the films?


The pro's used neg film, B&W like colour, was shot on negative film then positive prints made for distribution.
Yes there was B&W reversal film for amateurs.

How did they cut (edit)?
A working copy (print) was made from the original negatives and edited. When the final edit was decided upon, a duplicate negative was made with (special for that purpose) reversal film and cut and edited to match the working copy, prints were then made from the edited negative. The original negs went into storage. These are what the director works from when he edits his own 'cut'.


PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 3:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
Why do you want b&W slides? Digitise them and you may as well digitise from a negative.


Shure, and a beamer is the same as a projected slide. Ofcourse.....


PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you know the OP I think you would not make such a facetious comment. But then again, you probably would. It apears to be your style


PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
trev wrote:
Didnt AGFA have a reversal B+W film?

this, 32ASA probably too slow for Alex


I can see one website that has Agfa Scala 200X (ie. 200ASA) in stock. They also have Fomapan R 100ASA. Foma might also provide their own branded chemicals, but I'm not entirely sure.