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How to store the photos?
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 12:57 pm    Post subject: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

Until now I have never cared about this aspect but I want to improve to give a long life to the photos.

I usually print photographs in A4 and A3 format and lately I have relied on Digitalpix.it with excellent results. For these formats they use Fujicolor Crystal Archive Paper Supreme. The data sheet indicates the following:

Quote:
Since prints are usually used for the long term recording of images, as much effort as possible is made to use materials that exhibit the least amount of change over time. But the effects of high force during folding, light, heat, oxygen in the air, contaminating gases, humidity and mold cannot be completely avoided. Also the change in the photographic image or base material are minimized by maintaining the appropriate storage conditions for prints, such as those used by museums and art galleries. Temperature and humidity control is the most important key to minimizing the change that occurs in prints. Prints stored in the dark under the following conditions may be expected to show almost no change over time.

Storage period with almost no change - Temperature - Relative Humidity
More than 20 years - Below 10°C (50°F) - 30% — 50%
10/20 years - Below 25°C (77°F) - 30% — 50%

Notes on Prints Storage:
1. Prints should be inserted into albums, mounted, or placed into a bag (plastic*) for photographic prints before being stored.
*Made of polyester, polystyrene or polypropylene plastic, etc
2. Even during normal storage, it is recommended that prints be stored at a place as free as possible from hot and humid conditions, and away from direct illumination. The following are examples of undesirable storage conditions.

> Storage in a room closet facing a wall exposed to cold outside air (which may cause condensation).
> Storage in a place near the ceiling, such as an attic, the top of a closet or cupboard (where high temperatures may occur).

3. Storing prints with their front surfaces facing each other may result in unexpected problems. If the adjacent print placement is unavoidable, it is necesaary to keep the surface separated by, for example, the use of interleaving sheets of paper.


I was amazed by the declared "life" expectancy, can it be so short? I have family photos that are over 50/60 years old which, although poorly preserved, have kept very well. Current chemical technologies are worse than those of half a century ago.

I want to put the photos in polypropylene bags and then store them in archival boxes:

Bags : https://www.amazon.it/Favorit-400053790-Foratura-Universale-Confezione/dp/B014BE3K4I/ref=psdc_4290225031_t1_B000KT78VK
Boxes : https://www.amazon.it/dp/B00VAKYNB6

How do you do it?


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Raw digital image files are stored on multiple hard drives.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
Raw digital image files are stored on multiple hard drives.

You wrote in the wrong thread


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:47 pm    Post subject: Re: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

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Last edited by Blazer0ne on Tue Feb 22, 2022 6:40 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 3:52 pm    Post subject: Re: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

Blazer0ne wrote:
Never used this paper. How long has it been on the market?

I don't know Sad
Info : https://www.fujifilm.eu/it/prodotti/photo-finishing/p/fujicolor-crystal-archive-paper-supreme#overview

I have now read online that these prints have a life of 80 years if placed in the dark.


PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:14 pm    Post subject: Re: How to store the photos? Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2022 12:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for Bumping up this old post but I would like to thank you for starting this post related to this issue which I am also looking and I have also found the solution to it by visiting this post thanks...


PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2022 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So many debates on this and I am confident archiving prints is quite simple.
Keep light and air off the print, it will last decades. Nothing else really matters.
My comments come from print evaluation over a 40 year period. I am yet to see a single print that exhibits anything different to what I stated above.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2022 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ricon wrote:
So many debates on this and I am confident archiving prints is quite simple.
Keep light and air off the print, it will last decades. Nothing else really matters.
My comments come from print evaluation over a 40 year period. I am yet to see a single print that exhibits anything different to what I stated above.


Surely humidity (and possibly temperature) would be a consideration also?


PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2022 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suppose the preservation of prints is important, especially if they were subject to "darkroom magic" when being developed. But it is because of the relative fragility of prints themselves that I've always preferred to archive my negatives and slides to the greatest degree possible: archival sleeves, controlled temperature and humidity. For the most part, this has served me well. I have some Fujichrome slides -- E-6 and not known for archival stability -- that are now 39 years old and little if any color shift has occurred. By this same token, however, I have other E-6 sliides that are definitely beginning to show a shift. So, it has been my policy, ever since I've possessed the means, to archive my photos, both slides and negatives, digitally. And then to keep good track of the digital archives. Which can be a bigger job than one might think, and which is an oft-debated topic on its own. But I still don't see any real long-term solution other than what I'm doing now. So, I suppose you could say that I look at prints, especially color ones, as being disposable and replaceable.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2022 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RokkorDoctor wrote:
Ricon wrote:
So many debates on this and I am confident archiving prints is quite simple.
Keep light and air off the print, it will last decades. Nothing else really matters.
My comments come from print evaluation over a 40 year period. I am yet to see a single print that exhibits anything different to what I stated above.


Surely humidity (and possibly temperature) would be a consideration also?


Absolutely not.

I'll an give example, I've had stored a bunch of 8x10 Epson prints created with the first generation of inkjet inks.
These inks were fading in under 12 months. It's because of this deterioration companies started looking at improving the archival aspect and did improve their subsequent inks.
The 8x10's I've had stored were stored as I mentioned in my previous post.
They have sat in a room that has varying humidity and temps that range from around 7 degrees celsius in the winter to over 40 degrees in the summer.
These prints are now pushing 25 years old and always been under these same conditions. They look like they came fresh off the printer 25 minutes ago.

I could give many other examples as I have had many prints created using various processes and I have not seen anything that does not fall under my statement in my previous post.
Manufacturers claims and tests all mean nothing. I've now had long enough to put prints through real world archival tests.
My wedding photos were printed on the highest quality Kodak papers of the past using traditional printing.
Hung in a relatively temperature and humidity controlled environment, out of any harsh light, framed prints and in an album, they are all drastically fading and color shifting.
The Epson inkjet prints however are pristine.

I also have a 40-60 inch print hung which apparently should last 100 years. Shame I won't be around to see if it lasts the entire warranty period.
Maybe my daughter can make a public comment on it in the future and give an update on the state of the Epson 8x10's. lol


PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2022 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ricon wrote:
RokkorDoctor wrote:
Ricon wrote:
So many debates on this and I am confident archiving prints is quite simple.
Keep light and air off the print, it will last decades. Nothing else really matters.
My comments come from print evaluation over a 40 year period. I am yet to see a single print that exhibits anything different to what I stated above.


Surely humidity (and possibly temperature) would be a consideration also?


Absolutely not.

I'll an give example, I've had stored a bunch of 8x10 Epson prints created with the first generation of inkjet inks.
These inks were fading in under 12 months. It's because of this deterioration companies started looking at improving the archival aspect and did improve their subsequent inks.
The 8x10's I've had stored were stored as I mentioned in my previous post.
They have sat in a room that has varying humidity and temps that range from around 7 degrees celsius in the winter to over 40 degrees in the summer.
These prints are now pushing 25 years old and always been under these same conditions. They look like they came fresh off the printer 25 minutes ago.

I could give many other examples as I have had many prints created using various processes and I have not seen anything that does not fall under my statement in my previous post.
Manufacturers claims and tests all mean nothing. I've now had long enough to put prints through real world archival tests.
My wedding photos were printed on the highest quality Kodak papers of the past using traditional printing.
Hung in a relatively temperature and humidity controlled environment, out of any harsh light, framed prints and in an album, they are all drastically fading and color shifting.
The Epson inkjet prints however are pristine.

I also have a 40-60 inch print hung which apparently should last 100 years. Shame I won't be around to see if it lasts the entire warranty period.
Maybe my daughter can make a public comment on it in the future and give an update on the state of the Epson 8x10's. lol


Absolutely Smile -- your temperature and humidity are obviously within limits...outside those limits, however...


PostPosted: Wed Nov 09, 2022 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ricon wrote:
RokkorDoctor wrote:
Ricon wrote:
So many debates on this and I am confident archiving prints is quite simple.
Keep light and air off the print, it will last decades. Nothing else really matters.
My comments come from print evaluation over a 40 year period. I am yet to see a single print that exhibits anything different to what I stated above.


Surely humidity (and possibly temperature) would be a consideration also?


Absolutely not.

I'll an give example, I've had stored a bunch of 8x10 Epson prints created with the first generation of inkjet inks.
These inks were fading in under 12 months. It's because of this deterioration companies started looking at improving the archival aspect and did improve their subsequent inks.
The 8x10's I've had stored were stored as I mentioned in my previous post.
They have sat in a room that has varying humidity and temps that range from around 7 degrees celsius in the winter to over 40 degrees in the summer.
These prints are now pushing 25 years old and always been under these same conditions. They look like they came fresh off the printer 25 minutes ago.

I could give many other examples as I have had many prints created using various processes and I have not seen anything that does not fall under my statement in my previous post.
Manufacturers claims and tests all mean nothing. I've now had long enough to put prints through real world archival tests.
My wedding photos were printed on the highest quality Kodak papers of the past using traditional printing.
Hung in a relatively temperature and humidity controlled environment, out of any harsh light, framed prints and in an album, they are all drastically fading and color shifting.
The Epson inkjet prints however are pristine.

I also have a 40-60 inch print hung which apparently should last 100 years. Shame I won't be around to see if it lasts the entire warranty period.
Maybe my daughter can make a public comment on it in the future and give an update on the state of the Epson 8x10's. lol


OK,

but photographic (and inkjet) prints have a paper base (well, most anyway). Prolonged exposure of paper to high humidity (>65% RH or worse) can result in significant damage due to mould (UK) / mold (US). There is more to print preservation than avoiding fading/shifting colours...