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What collecting actually means
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection.


PostPosted: Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodrim wrote:
I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection.


me too, you're just way more succinct than I am. Wink


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodrim wrote:
I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection.


Nail on head Like 1 .

I wonder if we are split into two groups, as Mother Nature seems to prefer when one interest is at heart.


"I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection."

"I have a lens collection more so than a collection of lenses"

Both, are of course, of equal value to my mind.


Pirsig, In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, I think, talked of two gentleman at an outdoor cafe, both appreciating a stone staircase opposite. Except one was appreciating the aesthetic beauty, the other, the sublime construction. Neither quite seeing the value in the others perspective.

Nearer to home, I remember Sir Chris Bonnington, bluffly, but quite succinctly describing the two types of soul he found attached to the sides of mountains. Apes, and ballerinas. And you could not put a cigarette paper between the two in their ability to top a route. I would have to say that in my opinion however, Don Whillans was the exception that proved Bonnington's rule, appearing as he did to be both at the same time. Even in the esoterica of the very early days of Scottish mountain exploration, this split in kindred spirit was recognised enough to adopt names (or conditions?) for it. Martin Moran, in his book Scotland's winter mountains described it quite well I think -

"A schism within the SMC [Scottish Mountaineering Club] membership quickly became apparent between the 'ultra-montanes' and the 'salvationists' - in other words, the true climbers who revelled most in the physical difficulties, and the scenic mountaineers who gloried primarily in the views. In fact these two groups have co-existed amicably in the club up to the present day".

Why am I writing this stuff and nonsense? Well, I heard a section of gutter collapse in the snowy night and although I'm all geared up for the inspection, the weather is still horrible. Call me a 'Salvationist'.

Just one more coffee, then I'll definitely, definitely head out...


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
woodrim wrote:
I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection.


Nail on head Like 1 .

I wonder if we are split into two groups, as Mother Nature seems to prefer when one interest is at heart.


"I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection."

"I have a lens collection more so than a collection of lenses"

Both, are of course, of equal value to my mind.


Pirsig, In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, I think, talked of two gentleman at an outdoor cafe, both appreciating a stone staircase opposite. Except one was appreciating the aesthetic beauty, the other, the sublime construction. Neither quite seeing the value in the others perspective.

Nearer to home, I remember Sir Chris Bonnington, bluffly, but quite succinctly describing the two types of soul he found attached to the sides of mountains. Apes, and ballerinas. And you could not put a cigarette paper between the two in their ability to top a route. I would have to say that in my opinion however, Don Whillans was the exception that proved Bonnington's rule, appearing as he did to be both at the same time. Even in the esoterica of the very early days of Scottish mountain exploration, this split in kindred spirit was recognised enough to adopt names (or conditions?) for it. Martin Moran, in his book Scotland's winter mountains described it quite well I think -

"A schism within the SMC [Scottish Mountaineering Club] membership quickly became apparent between the 'ultra-montanes' and the 'salvationists' - in other words, the true climbers who revelled most in the physical difficulties, and the scenic mountaineers who gloried primarily in the views. In fact these two groups have co-existed amicably in the club up to the present day".

Why am I writing this stuff and nonsense? Well, I heard a section of gutter collapse in the snowy night and although I'm all geared up for the inspection, the weather is still horrible. Call me a 'Salvationist'.

Just one more coffee, then I'll definitely, definitely head out...


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
woodrim wrote:
I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection.


Nail on head Like 1 .

I wonder if we are split into two groups, as Mother Nature seems to prefer when one interest is at heart.


"I have a collection of lenses more so than a lens collection."

"I have a lens collection more so than a collection of lenses"

Both, are of course, of equal value to my mind.


Pirsig, In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, I think, talked of two gentleman at an outdoor cafe, both appreciating a stone staircase opposite. Except one was appreciating the aesthetic beauty, the other, the sublime construction. Neither quite seeing the value in the others perspective.

Nearer to home, I remember Sir Chris Bonnington, bluffly, but quite succinctly describing the two types of soul he found attached to the sides of mountains. Apes, and ballerinas. And you could not put a cigarette paper between the two in their ability to top a route. I would have to say that in my opinion however, Don Whillans was the exception that proved Bonnington's rule, appearing as he did to be both at the same time. Even in the esoterica of the very early days of Scottish mountain exploration, this split in kindred spirit was recognised enough to adopt names (or conditions?) for it. Martin Moran, in his book Scotland's winter mountains described it quite well I think -

"A schism within the SMC [Scottish Mountaineering Club] membership quickly became apparent between the 'ultra-montanes' and the 'salvationists' - in other words, the true climbers who revelled most in the physical difficulties, and the scenic mountaineers who gloried primarily in the views. In fact these two groups have co-existed amicably in the club up to the present day".

Why am I writing this stuff and nonsense? Well, I heard a section of gutter collapse in the snowy night and although I'm all geared up for the inspection, the weather is still horrible. Call me a 'Salvationist'.

Just one more coffee, then I'll definitely, definitely head out...


Interesting. You have mountains? I was thinking Highlands. And Sir Hillary traveled all the way to Tibet! (he was a New Zealander, I know). Here in my town of Mount Pleasant, I'm 10' above sea level. Still looking for the Mount.

I do appreciate both approaches but would never consider myself a collector. I would never own a lens to do anything other than use it for photography. A pristine lens in my possession will surely suffer from use if worthy. However, I do appreciate collectors of nearly anything. My dad was into antiques, I once had a classic car collection but even then, my appreciation was in driving them. Some people collect thimbles and you can be assured, there are many types and details they look for in rare and treasured thimbles. My grandfather collected stamps but only canceled ones; he was too cheap to collect unused ones, so his stamp collection strikes me as more a collection of stamps.


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodrim wrote:


Interesting. You have mountains? I was thinking Highlands. And Sir Hillary traveled all the way to Tibet!


Via Snowdonia of course, where the training was done. Oddly, Alpinist's from all over the world choose Scotland to do their training. I think it's the whisky.


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oldhand wrote:


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


The gable side stripped. Cast gutter lies at my feet. Plastic would be nice.


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
Oldhand wrote:


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


The gable side stripped. Cast gutter lies at my feet. Plastic would be nice.
Like 1 Like 1 Like 1 Like 1 Like 1


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
Oldhand wrote:


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


The gable side stripped. Cast gutter lies at my feet. Plastic would be nice.


Copper


PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2021 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
Oldhand wrote:


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


The gable side stripped. Cast gutter lies at my feet. Plastic would be nice.


Snow weighs heavily
Creaking, groaning, muted thump
Oh bugger, new gutter


PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oldhand wrote:


Snow weighs heavily
Creaking, groaning, muted thump
Oh bugger, new gutter



First laugh of the day. Thank you sir. Laugh 1.


PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2021 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:

Copper


It goes to a lovely verdigris quite quickly around here.


PostPosted: Sat Jan 16, 2021 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mountaineering is occasionally related to collecting (the Munroes etc)more than gutters i suppose, but perfectionism may connect both assembly , examination and storage of optics as well as increasing calls for performance.

I like to think that despite some drawers and shelves burdened with glass and metal, I do not collect, but use the things, and have merely been chasing perfection (and occasionally been tempted,by eccentric and uncommon devices such as my recent aquisition of a "Tessovar").

I never bothered much to sell, so stocks grew but not as a systematic collection . With hopes of concentrating on enjoying what I have, I find that seeking knowledge of their optical innards and their makers plus using them, can consume enough attention to prevent the stock from growing (apart from the constant need for some original lens shades & better lenscaps).

p.


PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I collect lenses, cameras and other photo gear for the sheer joy of it. I usually do so for the express purpose of using the kit to make images. Sometimes the gear I purchase provides me with a particular point of view or a technical advantage that allows me to capture an image in a totally new way, or in the way I have pre-conceived the outcome. In this way a lens may be likened to a painter's brush or paint knife. Other times the gear I purchase is of interest to me because it has some kind of historical, technical, or sentimental attraction. For instance, the first camera with a built-in meter, the model of camera that John Glenn took on his first ride into space as a Mercury astronaut, etc., etc., etc. Other times I can convince myself that I am a photo archaeologist working to save important historical artifacts marked for destruction. Also, sometimes there are deals that can't be passed up - how could someone sell such a beautiful precision instrument for that price - Do they know how much it cost new? Do they know how much it would cost to build that today??? Of course I am a mechanical engineer and i just love cool gadgets, like this mostly useless, but totally rad old Pentax 3 degree spotmeter.... Wink Wink





PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2021 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have this terrible problem that I have an absolutely mint, like new Voightländer Apo Lanthar 105mm f2. 5 lens, and I am scared to take it out of the box to use it.

Last edited by kymarto on Tue Jan 19, 2021 9:55 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2021 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kymarto wrote:
I have this terrible problem that I have an absolutely mint, like new Voightländer Apo Lanthars 105mm f2. 5 lens, and I am scared to take it out of the box to use it.


My first ever decent car was like that. I took it up to Corbridge to a bridge that's just wide enough for a car and not much more. Lined it up and put my foot down.

Cured me.. YMMV. Loved that car.


PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2021 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, ah, Takumar!
I stand and gaze upon you
Sitting on my shelf


PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kymarto wrote:
Ah, ah, Takumar!
I stand and gaze upon you
Sitting on my shelf

Smile
Much of the joy of Takumars is sensory.
The look, the feel, the absolute silky smoothness of the focus helicoid - all in an understated livery.
It helps that they make great images as well
Smile
Tom

Slow as a wet week I am
How appropriate to eulogise Takumar with Haiku
Well done


PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
Oldhand wrote:


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


The gable side stripped. Cast gutter lies at my feet. Plastic would be nice.


But surely any vintage lens aficionado prefers metal over plastic ????


PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2021 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bp_reid wrote:
Sciolist wrote:
Oldhand wrote:


I can see a Haiku involving sounds and snow in the night...... and a possible use of metaphor
Laugh 1


The gable side stripped. Cast gutter lies at my feet. Plastic would be nice.


But surely any vintage lens aficionado prefers metal over plastic ????


Indeed. Cast Iron is going back up. Got to really. Otherwise I'd not hear it fall off again. Whuump!

Joking apart, the brackets and fascia had done well. 145 years by my reckoning.