Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Beauty Canter-S 45mm f1.9
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2020 12:25 am    Post subject: Beauty Canter-S 45mm f1.9 Reply with quote

This lens seems to have come under several names over the few years that it was used on Beauty cameras in the 1950's. It is a 6/4 double gauss using lanthanum elements. It was first named the Canter-S, then the Beauty-S, and finally the Biokor-S on different camera models.

The lens is quite sharp, but suffers from very severe light falloff at f1.9. Bokeh is interesting. At close distances it is quite smooth, but as one moves farther away it takes on a distinct look that is not smooth at all. I've just started to experiment with the lens and looking forward to further walks!

#1


#2


#3


#4


#5


#6


#7


#8


PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2020 2:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like this! Upper right corner #7.

#1


PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2020 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that is what I call crazy bokeh. It might be interesting to try a moving object and panning.


PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2020 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice shots/photos indeed. I am always wondering, to adapt these lenses, how to determine the flange distance to achieve the inifinity focus, and since the flange distance is probably different for each lens (is this true), will you have to use a separate setup for each lens? Thanks for any information.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2020 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@vivaldibow, The flange distances for these fixed lenses taken from rangefinder cameras do vary, and since there is no formal mount, you end up with various rear configurations to somehow affix to a helicoid. Oftentimes you end up with the rear element hanging way back out of the barrel of what is left of the lens once you manage to extricate it from the body. In practice, I have always found it possible to mount the lens cell on a helicoid and achieve infinity focus. In a few cases I have had to use the thinnest M42 helicoid made, which is 10mm-15.5mm. I have 10mm, 12mm, 15mm and 17mm helicoids (minimum extension) and I've always managed to find one that achieves reasonable infinty to relatively close focus. This is mounting on a Sony A7 series with 18mm body flange distance.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2020 4:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kymarto wrote:
@vivaldibow, The flange distances for these fixed lenses taken from rangefinder cameras do vary, and since there is no formal mount, you end up with various rear configurations to somehow affix to a helicoid. Oftentimes you end up with the rear element hanging way back out of the barrel of what is left of the lens once you manage to extricate it from the body. In practice, I have always found it possible to mount the lens cell on a helicoid and achieve infinity focus. In a few cases I have had to use the thinnest M42 helicoid made, which is 10mm-15.5mm. I have 10mm, 12mm, 15mm and 17mm helicoids (minimum extension) and I've always managed to find one that achieves reasonable infinty to relatively close focus. This is mounting on a Sony A7 series with 18mm body flange distance.


Thanks very much for the information. So do you have one set of helicoid/adapter for each lens, or
there is one setup which could be used for all lenses? I am thinking, since the back of the lens from
those rangefinders are different, I guess there is probably not a single setup which could work for
all the lenses.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like 1 Like 1 nice find Toby!


PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting lens for artistic purposes!


PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2020 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vivaldibow wrote:
kymarto wrote:
@vivaldibow, The flange distances for these fixed lenses taken from rangefinder cameras do vary, and since there is no formal mount, you end up with various rear configurations to somehow affix to a helicoid. Oftentimes you end up with the rear element hanging way back out of the barrel of what is left of the lens once you manage to extricate it from the body. In practice, I have always found it possible to mount the lens cell on a helicoid and achieve infinity focus. In a few cases I have had to use the thinnest M42 helicoid made, which is 10mm-15.5mm. I have 10mm, 12mm, 15mm and 17mm helicoids (minimum extension) and I've always managed to find one that achieves reasonable infinty to relatively close focus. This is mounting on a Sony A7 series with 18mm body flange distance.


Thanks very much for the information. So do you have one set of helicoid/adapter for each lens, or
there is one setup which could be used for all lenses? I am thinking, since the back of the lens from
those rangefinders are different, I guess there is probably not a single setup which could work for
all the lenses.


I would prefer to have a dedicated helicoid for each lens, but since I have a bunch I generally share adapters between them. Since I have mirrorless, and don't use the focusing scale, it doesn't matter if the lens focuses past infinity. I generally use the longest I can get away with so that I have the closest focus possible. My adaptations are generally temporary: I use a lot of pvc electricians tape to secure lenses to rings that I can screw into an M42 helicoid, or if the rear barrel is small enough, I try to cook something up so that I can do a friction fit into the helicoid. At worst (it happens) I have to secure the lens directly to the helicoid with tape. That happens often with fixed rangefinder lenses which need to be as close to the sensor as possible on a very short helicoid. Some I could glue onto rings that would screw into the helicoid, but I am wary of solutions that would be hard to undo.


PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2020 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kymarto wrote:
vivaldibow wrote:
kymarto wrote:
@vivaldibow, The flange distances for these fixed lenses taken from rangefinder cameras do vary, and since there is no formal mount, you end up with various rear configurations to somehow affix to a helicoid. Oftentimes you end up with the rear element hanging way back out of the barrel of what is left of the lens once you manage to extricate it from the body. In practice, I have always found it possible to mount the lens cell on a helicoid and achieve infinity focus. In a few cases I have had to use the thinnest M42 helicoid made, which is 10mm-15.5mm. I have 10mm, 12mm, 15mm and 17mm helicoids (minimum extension) and I've always managed to find one that achieves reasonable infinty to relatively close focus. This is mounting on a Sony A7 series with 18mm body flange distance.


Thanks very much for the information. So do you have one set of helicoid/adapter for each lens, or
there is one setup which could be used for all lenses? I am thinking, since the back of the lens from
those rangefinders are different, I guess there is probably not a single setup which could work for
all the lenses.


I would prefer to have a dedicated helicoid for each lens, but since I have a bunch I generally share adapters between them. Since I have mirrorless, and don't use the focusing scale, it doesn't matter if the lens focuses past infinity. I generally use the longest I can get away with so that I have the closest focus possible. My adaptations are generally temporary: I use a lot of pvc electricians tape to secure lenses to rings that I can screw into an M42 helicoid, or if the rear barrel is small enough, I try to cook something up so that I can do a friction fit into the helicoid. At worst (it happens) I have to secure the lens directly to the helicoid with tape. That happens often with fixed rangefinder lenses which need to be as close to the sensor as possible on a very short helicoid. Some I could glue onto rings that would screw into the helicoid, but I am wary of solutions that would be hard to undo.


Thanks very much for the details. I guess there is no one-size-fit-all solution. But there are ways to make things economic.