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Is the Sony Nex 5n still good in 2019?
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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 10:33 pm    Post subject: Is the Sony Nex 5n still good in 2019? Reply with quote

Is the Sony Nex 5n still good in 2019?

I recently went back a revisited my old Sony Nex 5n recently after years of not using it since getting my a7's.
It was a fun little excursion with an old friend and I have shared a bit of a story and some images with a manual focus lens if anyone is interested in having a look.

http://joshpereraphoto.metalforfishes.com/?p=3122

Does anybody here still use what would technically be considered an older camera? Or have you recently gone back to one?


PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm using a 2009 Panasonic GF1, a 2010 Canon S90 (for the CCD sensor), and a 2012 Fujifilm X-E1.


I became more relaxed when I came across a female photographer out of Los Angeles I think, who is making a bundle using old 5mp digital cameras bought from thrift stores. They produce the look she sought, and the corporates love her work. I can't remember her name unfortunately. I probably blocked it from my mind. That much talent shouldn't be allowed.


PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 11:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Is the Sony Nex 5n still good in 2019? Reply with quote

Hood wrote:
Is the Sony Nex 5n still good in 2019?

Does anybody here still use what would technically be considered an older camera? Or have you recently gone back to one?


In answer to your first question, the NEX 5N has 16.1 mp, which is plenty for most applications, and your photo also shows that it seems to do just fine, this being 2019 and all.

In answer to your second question, I have a large floor-to-almost-ceiling cabinet stuffed full of old film cameras. And I try to use them all too, although it takes a while now.

My oldest cameras date back to the 50s and a couple of them are fantastic picture takers (Zeiss Super Ikonta BX and Agfa Isolette III). And then there are all the manual focus classics from the 70s and 80s, which many folks would consider "old."


PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2019 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite a market...

My 7 year old daughter uses a D70 with a 55mm 1.8 AF-D. Has been for the last 3 years. She really likes it, and has started using the 18-70mm kit lens recently.

I still enjoy editing RAW files, as far back as 2004, that this camera produced. The CCD does very good around native ISO.

I recently aquired a Kodak Easy Share 5mp for my 5 year old son. He handles it well.

In terms of handling I have moved on to mirrorless, and could not see myself using another DSLR.

Currently I use Sony APS-C a6000 and a6300. The older model shows its age in low light, so I use it more where it shines.

Whoo Turtle


PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah: I've bought a Meike 28mm F2.8 pancake for my Sony NEX-3N and still use it.
Not the best lens in the world, yet it makes a ton of sense for compact APS-C body.

The bokeh is also surprisingly good:



Also, the camera now fits in any standard cycling pouch for water bottle.
With CPL and lens cap attached. Finally, the compact aps-c setup is truly compact again.


PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I still use my Sony DSC-F717 5MP camera, usually for infrared these days.



PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2019 5:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
I'm using a 2009 Panasonic GF1, a 2010 Canon S90 (for the CCD sensor), and a 2012 Fujifilm X-E1.


I became more relaxed when I came across a female photographer out of Los Angeles I think, who is making a bundle using old 5mp digital cameras bought from thrift stores. They produce the look she sought, and the corporates love her work. I can't remember her name unfortunately. I probably blocked it from my mind. That much talent shouldn't be allowed.

There are definitely those who prove the old addage that it's not the gear but the photographer, that is for sure....


cooltouch wrote:
In answer to your first question, the NEX 5N has 16.1 mp, which is plenty for most applications, and your photo also shows that it seems to do just fine, this being 2019 and all.

In answer to your second question, I have a large floor-to-almost-ceiling cabinet stuffed full of old film cameras. And I try to use them all too, although it takes a while now.

My oldest cameras date back to the 50s and a couple of them are fantastic picture takers (Zeiss Super Ikonta BX and Agfa Isolette III). And then there are all the manual focus classics from the 70s and 80s, which many folks would consider "old."


I still love shooting film, being that is what I grew up with. Love my MInolta x700's, canon ae1's, nikon fm2's, Asahi spotmnatics, Mamiya 645, Linhof Technica etc. etc.
I too have a large glass cabinet filled with all my film cameras and lenses etc. Love them. Smile

blazerone wrote:
Quite a market...

My 7 year old daughter uses a D70 with a 55mm 1.8 AF-D. Has been for the last 3 years. She really likes it, and has started using the 18-70mm kit lens recently.

I still enjoy editing RAW files, as far back as 2004, that this camera produced. The CCD does very good around native ISO.

I recently aquired a Kodak Easy Share 5mp for my 5 year old son. He handles it well.

In terms of handling I have moved on to mirrorless, and could not see myself using another DSLR.

Currently I use Sony APS-C a6000 and a6300. The older model shows its age in low light, so I use it more where it shines.


Nice one. My two and a half year old son is showing and interest in photography so I want to get him soemthing to practice with. Any suggestions? I'm thinking one of those tough waterproof point and shoots...

aidaho wrote:
Yeah: I've bought a Meike 28mm F2.8 pancake for my Sony NEX-3N and still use it.
Not the best lens in the world, yet it makes a ton of sense for compact APS-C body.

The bokeh is also surprisingly good:



Also, the camera now fits in any standard cycling pouch for water bottle.
With CPL and lens cap attached. Finally, the compact aps-c setup is truly compact again.


Oh nice one, I've seen those Meike lenses recently. How do they compare to quality vintage glass?

digichromed wrote:
I still use my Sony DSC-F717 5MP camera, usually for infrared these days.


Nice one. Only ever shot infrared film, would love an infrared digital oneday. Smile


PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2019 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hood wrote:

aidaho wrote:
Yeah: I've bought a Meike 28mm F2.8 pancake for my Sony NEX-3N and still use it.
Not the best lens in the world, yet it makes a ton of sense for compact APS-C body.

Oh nice one, I've seen those Meike lenses recently. How do they compare to quality vintage glass?

Wide open it delivers significantly more resolution, but lags behind in across the frame sharpness stopped down.
Flare resistance is much better. Bokeh is much better.
There isn't much of the latter due to how slow the lens is, but the quality is there.

Handling is worse than vintage mostly due to size.
The lack of adjustable infinity hard stop is annoying.
The aperture ring is meh, but does it's job and holds the setting.
In an unlikely turn of the events, focusing smoothness and resistance is top-tier.
I'm sure very short helical did help here, but the main credit goes to the impeccable helical thread quality and lubricant of choice.

Hope this helps.


PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 4:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

aidaho wrote:
Hood wrote:

aidaho wrote:
Yeah: I've bought a Meike 28mm F2.8 pancake for my Sony NEX-3N and still use it.
Not the best lens in the world, yet it makes a ton of sense for compact APS-C body.

Oh nice one, I've seen those Meike lenses recently. How do they compare to quality vintage glass?

Wide open it delivers significantly more resolution, but lags behind in across the frame sharpness stopped down.
Flare resistance is much better. Bokeh is much better.
There isn't much of the latter due to how slow the lens is, but the quality is there.

Handling is worse than vintage mostly due to size.
The lack of adjustable infinity hard stop is annoying.
The aperture ring is meh, but does it's job and holds the setting.
In an unlikely turn of the events, focusing smoothness and resistance is top-tier.
I'm sure very short helical did help here, but the main credit goes to the impeccable helical thread quality and lubricant of choice.

Hope this helps.


Awesome. That is some great info. Thankyou very much.
I must admit, since seeing them I am tempted to try some of these new cheap native manual focus lenses for my nex's, just purely from the size factor. Without an adaptor required for a vintage lens, it can make for a huge difference in compactness I imagine.


PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I wanted to get a NEX camera at the tail end of last year, and found some of the features of the 5N made it unsuitable as a choice. (The flash shoe may well have been one of these). The NEX6 ticked enough of the boxes for me & wasn't significantly more expensive.

However you're in a very different situation. If you have a camera that gave good results a few years back, why should it's results no longer be good (unless it's got broken)?

I sometimes (rarely though) still use digital cameras I've had for about 10 years - and brought second hand even then! In many circumstances they are significantly worse than newer models, but sometimes the differences can allow them to achieve things the newer models can't, or give a different look (CCD models are sometimes valued for this). In good light 10 year old cameras can produce shots that print well to at least A4 - if conditions are not beyond a camera & it's pleasant to use it then it would be a shame to just relegate it to the junk pile!


PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2019 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm using A7R III, but also first gen OM-D Smile

Works nicely on those smaller formats!


PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
I wanted to get a NEX camera at the tail end of last year, and found some of the features of the 5N made it unsuitable as a choice. (The flash shoe may well have been one of these). The NEX6 ticked enough of the boxes for me & wasn't significantly more expensive.

However you're in a very different situation. If you have a camera that gave good results a few years back, why should it's results no longer be good (unless it's got broken)?

I sometimes (rarely though) still use digital cameras I've had for about 10 years - and brought second hand even then! In many circumstances they are significantly worse than newer models, but sometimes the differences can allow them to achieve things the newer models can't, or give a different look (CCD models are sometimes valued for this). In good light 10 year old cameras can produce shots that print well to at least A4 - if conditions are not beyond a camera & it's pleasant to use it then it would be a shame to just relegate it to the junk pile!


I bought a $20 hotshoe adapter to get over this short coming of the nex 5 back when I used to use it as part of a small portable portrait rig. Worked perfectly. Slow Speed sync at 1/250.

I think this point about camera obsolescence is especially valid now given that the Leica M9 is 10 years old now, and that camera certainly still performs perfectly and still makes great large prints. It's main drawback being it's high iso performance. But that is often subjective and dependent on the photographer and how much grain they can tolerate. If you've ever shot High speed film, Grainy images becomes less and less of a problem and more and more of a creative feature. haha

Nordentro wrote:
I'm using A7R III, but also first gen OM-D Smile

Works nicely on those smaller formats!


I have yet to have a chance to try one of the OMD series cameras, but all report say that they are great bang for buck. Good af. Good Colour etc. Just ISO performance due to sensor size is it's main weakness I hear.


PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hood wrote:

I bought a $20 hotshoe adapter to get over this short coming of the nex 5 back when I used to use it as part of a small portable portrait rig. Worked perfectly. Slow Speed sync at 1/250.


I've done the same thing with my NEX 7. I use it in conjunction with a Nikon SB24 flash as part of my slide duping rig.