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Is it possible to respool 126 cassette?
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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 5:00 pm    Post subject: Is it possible to respool 126 cassette? Reply with quote

found at local flea market
one could engineer a cassette with 3d printer
but the film perforation is a problem?

why? just for fun and history



PostPosted: Mon Sep 04, 2017 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not? Seems easy to crack the cassette & wind onto 126 spool. Onto 135 reel, yes, sprocket holes could be problem. ..


PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IIRC the sprocket holes are a lot less frequent on 126 film. It might be possible to tape over 135 holes to give a similar arrangement (probably best to have slightly longer spacing rather than too short if exactly right isn't practical).

However none of the 126 cameras I remember were remotely worth the effort.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
However none of the 126 cameras I remember were remotely worth the effort.


I got as a gift a Kodak from my brother-in-law his late father used in the 1970's. It is mint condition and I'm sort of a Kodak-buff.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not totally sure but I thought re-spooling 126 cartridges was something Larry spoke about in and around the time he shared the extra Contaflex 126 set with me. In future I may tackle it but its likely to be B&W once my ferania 126 cartridges are gone from the back of my fridge.
If I remember correctly your main issue on re-spooling is that 126 film was paper backed . . . which is how frame numbers were displayed.
The Contaflex 126 we always said was a bit of an enigma since it was advertised as an SLR for the ordinary guy but when the math on price was done it was actually very pricey.
Here is a link to Mr.Butkus' site and the manual for that camera with its interchangeable lenses . . .
http://www.butkus.org/chinon/zeiss_ikon/zeiss_ikon_contaflex_126/zeiss_ikon_contaflex_126.htm

In my opinion there was another jewel in the 126 format . . . the Zeiss Ikon IKOMATICs . It was my late mom's camera directly from Germany. The optics always impressed me - zeiss of course.

Jim


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskalaCafe wrote:
DConvert wrote:
However none of the 126 cameras I remember were remotely worth the effort.


I got as a gift a Kodak from my brother-in-law his late father used in the 1970's. It is mint condition and I'm sort of a Kodak-buff.


FYI I saw a Vest Pocket Kodak (appeared to be in very good condition) in one of the Charity shops in town today for £40. I struggled to resit, until thoughts of my wife's comments when she found out helped me walk away.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
kansalliskalaCafe wrote:
DConvert wrote:
However none of the 126 cameras I remember were remotely worth the effort.


I got as a gift a Kodak from my brother-in-law his late father used in the 1970's. It is mint condition and I'm sort of a Kodak-buff.


FYI I saw a Vest Pocket Kodak (appeared to be in very good condition) in one of the Charity shops in town today for £40. I struggled to resit, until thoughts of my wife's comments when she found out helped me walk away.

Friends


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2017 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's possible. I do know someone who actually did so, just for fun.

Apparently the sprockets aren't a problem, see here: https://www.lomography.nl/magazine/44732-recargando-tu-carrete-de-126-con-pelicula-de-35-mm

There are some cameras that have more manual settings than the usual Instamatic versions, i have one around which i kept for some 126 experiments as well, i still have 3 new film cartridges.


PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back around 2001 I wrote the following for a web-site I was running at the time - you might find it interesting :

These outlined procedures assume a working knowledge of handling roll-film in a darkroom situation and that you'll almost certainly be processing the film yourself. It is also assumed that, at least by careful examination of an existing loaded cartridge, you are aware of how the film is loaded into the cartridge. One might also reasonably assume that anyone keen enough to want to continue using an Instamatic camera has a reasonably sophisticated instrument, which, by definition, probably has the capability of sensing the film speed from the notch on the cartridge. Consideration may therefore be given to either the choice of film-speed to be loaded or the modification of the notch to match the chosen emulsion. This will obviously have to be within the original film-speed capability specifications of the camera in question. Unfortunately I have insufficient different speed 126 cartridges to be able to ascertain what parameters pertain to this notch. Maybe someone somewhere has this information and is willing to share it, or perhaps modify a cartridge or two and compare meter readings to confirm the dimensions.

So, is it possible? Theoretically ... yes.

In practice, unless you're really keen, probably not Sad

The stumbling block is the single index hole every frame that all Instamatic cameras require, at least to "know" when to stop winding and often to re-initialise the shutter as well.

Requirements :
1.A supply of cartridges, obviously, carefully opened to remove the existing, presumably exposed, but possibly extremely outdated film. It is usually possible to split the cartridge along the original seam at the take-up spool end so it can be pried apart sufficiently to remove the spool, with existing film, without actually breaking the plastic. There is no supply spool in the 126 cartridge, the un-exposed film simply lying coiled in the supply chamber. The cartridges will need to be re-sealed, once reloaded, for light-proofing, probably using appropriate tape, as re-glueing them will limit their re-useability.

2.A supply of suitably numbered and perforated backing paper. This may (should?) have been recovered in step 1 when the original film was processed, but can only probably be re-used a limited number of times, as the repeated attachment of adhesive tape for the purposes of fastening the film will eventually damage it beyond use.

3.A supply of suitably perforated 35mm wide film. Unfortunately "normal" 35mm film is not suitable for the purpose, as the sprocket holes don't line up symmetrically with the original perforations on 126 film. Also, the sprocket holes on the opposite edge will intrude completely into the frame of a 126 negative. So, film will probably have to be cut from larger stock, such as 120, (see my page Modifying 120 Film for 828 Cameras for ideas). Ensure that the original edge of the film becomes the perforated edge in the 126 cartridge, so the edge markings don't intrude on your images. At this point you have two basic options ... either remove the film from it's backing paper, cut it to length and attach it to the 126 backing paper, then perforate it, using the 126 backing paper as a template ... or leave the film attached to the original backing paper, again cut it to length, re-numerate it if required and perforate to suit. A third option may be to remove the film from the backing paper and store this in a light-proof place, then perforate and enumerate the backing paper in the light. Back in the dark, the film could be then re-attached and perforated using the pre-punched backing paper as a template. Bear in mind that all this film handling is conducted in total darkness!

4.The actual reloading of the cartridge can possibly be achieved in two ways. Firstly, by simply pushing the film + backing paper through the gap made when the spool was initially removed, though I very much doubt it will be possible to coax a 24-exposure length to coil up neatly in the supply chamber, so this method will probably be limited to rather shorter lengths. Secondly, pry the supply chamber apart sufficiently to insert a pre-coiled length of film, pushing the paper leader through the cartridge for subsequent attachment to the take-up spool. Note, I have made no suggestion of completely splitting the cartridge into it's two component parts. Whilst this may be possible with some cartridges, (and if so I'd like to know which ones), it is my experience that the central part of the cartridge is quite fragile and is most likely to snap completely if subjected to excess force.

As you have no doubt surmised, for an occasional cartridge of film, the effort required is probably going to be rather excessive, but should you contemplate long-term reasonable usage of the format, and have (or know someone who has) the expertise to build some kind of perforating jig that would be relatively easy to use in the dark, I could anticipate cutting down 120 film to suit to be a practical option. I have two concepts of this jig, one would be a simple "linear" device which comprised little more than a film guide and a punch guide, for the index hole, with some means of establishing hole spacing, (approximately 31.5mm/1.25 inches), the other (more sophisticated?) version would comprise a roller, the circumference of which equated to the hole spacing and on the edge of which was a punch. With a suitable feed-wheel system or pressure roller, a film guide and a crank handle, one could simply feed the prepared film in, turn the crank a couple of dozen times and end up with perfectly perforated film. You might wish to consider some means of numbering the frames, but bearing in mind this is all conducted in the dark, that may be a little optimistic. The frame spacing is not too critical, provided the frames are not too close together, so if measuring to the nearest 1/32" or millimetre, err on the side of wider rather than smaller. The index hole probably does not have to be square, a suitably sized and positioned round hole will almost certainly be adequate for almost all cameras and it will probably be easier to manufacture a punch mechanism to provide a round hole. A sacrificed film cartridge could probably be modified for use as a film guide to provide good registration between the film and backing paper, both for the punching of holes and the possible writing of frame numbers.


PostPosted: Sun Jan 27, 2019 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not sure but I think I actually did follow your instrucions. Smile

The coloured felt pens are for following film transfer.



PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2019 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have recently done it for the first time. If you stick the film to the backing paper the sensor will only read the holes in the paper - it ignores the 35mm sprocket holes as the paper prevents it going through them. Spacing may be a little uneven though. It appears to work well although I havent developed my first film yet...

Its fiddly in the dark put practical. I suggest keeping the reloaded cart in the dark as much as poss in case of light leak through the seams on the cartridge. I have an old tobacco tin perfect for storing mine.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2019 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
If you stick the film to the backing paper the sensor will only read the holes in the paper - it ignores the 35mm sprocket holes as the paper prevents it going through them. Spacing may be a little uneven though.


that depends on the camera, Agfa works pretty well but Kodaks depend on the model


PostPosted: Wed Mar 20, 2019 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
philslizzy wrote:
If you stick the film to the backing paper the sensor will only read the holes in the paper - it ignores the 35mm sprocket holes as the paper prevents it going through them. Spacing may be a little uneven though.


that depends on the camera, Agfa works pretty well but Kodaks depend on the model


OK I suppose I'm lucky as it works well in my Kodak.