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The Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33 lens
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 11:33 pm    Post subject: The Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33 lens Reply with quote

"If you thought the Zeiss f/0.7 lenses we shared yesterday were impressive, check out this crazy piece of glass: it’s the Carl Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33."



https://petapixel.com/2013/08/06/carl-zeiss-super-q-gigantar-40mm-f0-33-the-fastest-lens-ever-made/


Last edited by Gerald on Fri Jan 04, 2019 12:49 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2019 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald wrote:
"If you thought the Zeiss f/0.7 lenses we shared yesterday were impressive, check out this crazy piece of glass: it’s the Carl Zeiss Super-Q-Gigantar 40mm f/0.33."



https://petapixel.com/2013/08/06/carl-zeiss-super-q-gigantar-40mm-f0-33-the-fastest-lens-ever-made/


Gerald, that it was just a marketing gag for the Photokina show many years ago,
and even the petapixel guys soo greedy for "news" fell into that trap...

Zeiss technician took some large condensor lenses and made that non functional
"lens" - they must have cracked up laughing.... Wink

https://www.ormsdirect.co.za/blog/the-worlds-fastest-fake-lens-zeiss-40mm-f0-33/

I split this off IT DOES NOT BELONG to the Simlar lens thread...


PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Klaus, these Zeiss engineers are jokers! Laugh 1


PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gerald wrote:
Klaus, these Zeiss engineers are jokers! Laugh 1


I'm sure they were rolling on the floor with laughter when they were doing that...I woudl have!! Laugh 1


PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even the lens' name is funny Mr. Green


PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2019 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sjak wrote:
Even the lens' name is funny Mr. Green


That was part of that marketing gag Zeiss made! Laugh 1


PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2019 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This lens has been my avatar for years... Wink


PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2019 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After Charlie Barringer died his collection went to auction at Westicht. His Super-Q Gigantar brought 90,000 Euros plus a 20% buyer's premium. Quite a joke.


PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2019 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laugh 1 Thank You Dog Like Dog


PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

danfromm wrote:
After Charlie Barringer died his collection went to auction at Westicht. His Super-Q Gigantar brought 90,000 Euros plus a 20% buyer's premium. Quite a joke.


Well, at least his heirs benefitted from that then Thank You Dog


PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2019 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

danfromm wrote:
After Charlie Barringer died his collection went to auction at Westicht. His Super-Q Gigantar brought 90,000 Euros plus a 20% buyer's premium. Quite a joke.


I just wonder how much a Super-Q Giganton would cost... Laugh 1


PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fastest Zeiss lens I ever seen is 50mm/F0.77, used on X-Ray machines.


PostPosted: Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
danfromm wrote:
After Charlie Barringer died his collection went to auction at Westicht. His Super-Q Gigantar brought 90,000 Euros plus a 20% buyer's premium. Quite a joke.


Well, at least his heirs benefitted from that then Thank You Dog


So you'd think. But Peter Koeln bought the entire collection, except for the Uhu-linse, which went to a museum in Philadelphia, as a lot. Charlie's widow wasn't happy with the offer, but what could she do?

On another topic, that fastest lens possible in air is f/0.50. Oil immersion objectives for microscopes can be faster than f/0.33, but aren't very practical for general photography.


PostPosted: Sun Jan 20, 2019 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

danfromm wrote:
kds315* wrote:
danfromm wrote:
After Charlie Barringer died his collection went to auction at Westicht. His Super-Q Gigantar brought 90,000 Euros plus a 20% buyer's premium. Quite a joke.


Well, at least his heirs benefitted from that then Thank You Dog


So you'd think. But Peter Koeln bought the entire collection, except for the Uhu-linse, which went to a museum in Philadelphia, as a lot. Charlie's widow wasn't happy with the offer, but what could she do?

On another topic, that fastest lens possible in air is f/0.50. Oil immersion objectives for microscopes can be faster than f/0.33, but aren't very practical for general photography.


Well, that's sad then for he, I thought she had put it up for auction there and not sold it as a lot. Bit sad as Charlie in his days had promised me a few lenses for UV he had collected, but after his passing all that was forgotten...

My friend Marco Cavina researched quite a bit about that UHU-lens and he has the cross section of it (from the Operation paperclip documents), very interesting infrared lens with auto destruction function built into the image amplification tube (!!)


PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Klaus, after Charlie received his death sentence he discussed how the estate could sell the collection with, I think, everyone who would talk with him. The discussions I was in were calm and somewhat cold-blooded. We went over the inventory, concluded that letting it out a little at a time via eBay would take much, much too long. We went over dealers who might take the collection as a lot (quick payment for the estate) or sell it on commission (the money would come in slowly ...). We found no alternative to Westlicht for a collection that large. No other dealer seemed to have the resources to buy it as a lot.

So Peter came over, crated the most valuable items and then Therese boxed and shipped the less valuable ones. Mountains of boxes.

As it turned out, the very most valuable pieces were sold via Westlicht's own auctions. Some of the other stuff went from Westlicht to eBay, more to a couple of dealers who I suspect were Westlicht under another name. I have no idea where all of it has been shifted. I recognized a few items on eBay as Charlie's. For example, I sold him 40/4.5 and 90/6.3 Mikrotars, saw both lenses on eBay. After I saw a 1.75"/2.8 Elcan that looked familiar on eBay I asked Westlicht if it had been Charlie's. They said it was.

This story's moral, at least for major collectors, is to plan for disposal of the collection as far in advance as possible.


PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

danfromm wrote:
Klaus, after Charlie received his death sentence he discussed how the estate could sell the collection with, I think, everyone who would talk with him. The discussions I was in were calm and somewhat cold-blooded. We went over the inventory, concluded that letting it out a little at a time via eBay would take much, much too long. We went over dealers who might take the collection as a lot (quick payment for the estate) or sell it on commission (the money would come in slowly ...). We found no alternative to Westlicht for a collection that large. No other dealer seemed to have the resources to buy it as a lot.

So Peter came over, crated the most valuable items and then Therese boxed and shipped the less valuable ones. Mountains of boxes.

As it turned out, the very most valuable pieces were sold via Westlicht's own auctions. Some of the other stuff went from Westlicht to eBay, more to a couple of dealers who I suspect were Westlicht under another name. I have no idea where all of it has been shifted. I recognized a few items on eBay as Charlie's. For example, I sold him 40/4.5 and 90/6.3 Mikrotars, saw both lenses on eBay. After I saw a 1.75"/2.8 Elcan that looked familiar on eBay I asked Westlicht if it had been Charlie's. They said it was.

This story's moral, at least for major collectors, is to plan for disposal of the collection as far in advance as possible.


Thanks Dan! Indeed I am on the brink of starting exactly that...(re your very last sentence)


PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello,

this discussion about the Carl Zeiss "Super-Q Gigantar" superfast lens, is one of the funniest events in the story of modern optics.

We're used to see Zeissianern, as most serious scientists, but they're humans as everybody are.

The "Q", if I correctly remember, is for the German word "Quatsch", or "nonsense": just a hilarious reply, to that time's race to superfast lenses.

Re. Charles Barringer's collection, it's sad that it went as it did.

Having worked for more than 20 years as expert in auction houses (not specialized in photography, though), I'm surprised that it wouldn't have been taken the decision for a consignment to an auction house and sell the collection in one or more sales (depending on the amount of lots), named after the collector, like, for instance, "The Elmar Lang Collection".

After the sale, the auction house usually waits 30/40 days, then pays the owner of the sold lots.

Such a fine large, and historical collection, would have found its better "end" in a special sale, whose catalogues would have remained as a "textbook" to future collectors.

Best wishes,

E.L.


PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elmar Lang wrote:
Hello,

this discussion about the Carl Zeiss "Super-Q Gigantar" superfast lens, is one of the funniest events in the story of modern optics.

We're used to see Zeissianern, as most serious scientists, but they're humans as everybody are.

The "Q", if I correctly remember, is for the German word "Quatsch", or "nonsense": just a hilarious reply, to that time's race to superfast lenses.

Re. Charles Barringer's collection, it's sad that it went as it did.

Having worked for more than 20 years as expert in auction houses (not specialized in photography, though), I'm surprised that it wouldn't have been taken the decision for a consignment to an auction house and sell the collection in one or more sales (depending on the amount of lots), named after the collector, like, for instance, "The Elmar Lang Collection".

After the sale, the auction house usually waits 30/40 days, then pays the owner of the sold lots.

Such a fine large, and historical collection, would have found its better "end" in a special sale, whose catalogues would have remained as a "textbook" to future collectors.

Best wishes,

E.L.


Yep, I fully agree, it should have done this way, but "someone" took his chance and talked the desperate wife into selling I guess...a shame really.


PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://forum.mflenses.com/anyone-know-this-lens-t15760.html



PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 5:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kansalliskalaCafe wrote:
http://forum.mflenses.com/anyone-know-this-lens-t15760.html



Oh my, when will it be up for auction?? Thank You Dog


PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
Yep, I fully agree, it should have done this way, but "someone" took his chance and talked the desperate wife into selling I guess...a shame really.


Well, having been involved an auction house (and what an auction house!), their experts themselves should have had to counsel the widow to sell via a special, "monographic" sale.

I've often had to deal with very old collectors, or their heirs (in the field of antique arms & armour, orders & decorations): I've always informed that putting their collections in auction, would have been the best choice.

I didn't know that Charles Barringer's collection ended this way.

But what's done, is done.

Best wishes,

E.L.

P.S.: my collection of orders and decorations, is catalogued and photographed: would anything happen, it will go and be auctioned, unless my son and daughter would like to continue it.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
Oh my, when will it be up for auction??


http://forum.mflenses.com/helios-44m-mechanical-diagram-anywhere-t80238.html

Strange co-incidence is that I re-assemblet that particular Helios just yesterday. It was in parts in our shed for 10 year until I realized I need a standard lens for a free Praktica I'm getting. Very Happy


PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Elmar Lang wrote:
Having worked for more than 20 years as expert in auction houses (not specialized in photography, though), I'm surprised that it wouldn't have been taken the decision for a consignment to an auction house and sell the collection in one or more sales (depending on the amount of lots), named after the collector, like, for instance, "The Elmar Lang Collection"..


Elmer, I beg to differ. Charlie's collection was immense and it had many duplicates, e.g., dozens of nearly-identical Contax IIs holding dozens (one each) of nearly identical 50/1.5 Sonnars. The market for pedestrian gear such as these is somewhat thin. When we discussed what to do with them, we worried that offering all of them together would seriously depress the market.

Peter Koeln didn't swoop down on a helpless widow, he was invited to make an offer. Therese pretended otherwise, but she understood very well what Charlie had. Rare and valuable lenses, also odds and ends and junk.

Westlicht had one auction dedicated to the cream of the Barringer collection. The Barringer collection was, though, much more milk than cream.

Charlie and his friends agreed that no other specialist auction house had the resources to buy the entire collection or clients who'd buy the stuff. Stan Tamarkin was second best, and he couldn't come close to doing the job.

I've never bought from Westlicht, I'm too poor, but they seem to be better than anyone else at finding buyers for valuable gear.

You have to understand that the estate wanted to move everything reasonably quickly, did not want to wait years for the milk to go. They understood, as Klaus and I do, that Zeit ist geld.