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Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:46 pm    Post subject: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

An interesting review of the subject lens is found here:

http://vintage-camera-lenses.com/konica-hexanon-ar-24-mm-f2-8/

I bought one of these a while back with fungus. The fungus brought down price into my price range.

Upon arrival the lens was in splendid condition aside from the fungus. And the fungus, while surely present, was not at all overwhelming. That is to say, the lens is wholly usable as is.

But of course lens fungus worsens with the passage of time. It has been a quandary for me whether or not to attempt dismantling and cleaning the lens, risking in the process spoiling a perfectly usable and highly desirable lens.


PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is an excellent lens, one of my favourite 24mm's. Another con not mentioned in the review is the rather 'clunky' aperture ring but then most Hexanons are the same.


PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 1:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

guardian wrote:
An interesting review of the subject lens is found here:

http://vintage-camera-lenses.com/konica-hexanon-ar-24-mm-f2-8/

I bought one of these a while back with fungus. The fungus brought down price into my price range.

Upon arrival the lens was in splendid condition aside from the fungus. And the fungus, while surely present, was not at all overwhelming. That is to say, the lens is wholly usable as is.

But of course lens fungus worsens with the passage of time. It has been a quandary for me whether or not to attempt dismantling and cleaning the lens, risking in the process spoiling a perfectly usable and highly desirable lens.


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored proprrly.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DigiChromeEd wrote:
It is an excellent lens, one of my favourite 24mm's. Another con not mentioned in the review is the rather 'clunky' aperture ring but then most Hexanons are the same.


The aperture ring is by far the worst aspect of the Konica AR EE/AE lenses(their preset is a joy to use), it's too thin and not smooth to use at all, and the detents are far too close together, I've been tempted to mod mine, if it's possible, I'd have to literally look into it.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lightshow wrote:
DigiChromeEd wrote:
It is an excellent lens, one of my favourite 24mm's. Another con not mentioned in the review is the rather 'clunky' aperture ring but then most Hexanons are the same.


The aperture ring is by far the worst aspect of the Konica AR EE/AE lenses(their preset is a joy to use), it's too thin and not smooth to use at all, and the detents are far too close together, I've been tempted to mod mine, if it's possible, I'd have to literally look into it.


Couldn't agree more - same on the 28mm f3.5 - pain in the a.....
T


PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2018 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oldhand wrote:
Lightshow wrote:
DigiChromeEd wrote:

... Another con not mentioned in the review is the rather 'clunky' aperture ring but then most Hexanons are the same.


The aperture ring is by far the worst aspect of the Konica AR EE/AE lenses(their preset is a joy to use), it's too thin and not smooth to use at all, and the detents are far too close together, I've been tempted to mod mine, if it's possible, I'd have to literally look into it.


Couldn't agree more - same on the 28mm f3.5 - pain in the a.....
T


Couldn't agree more ... many of the AR Hexanon primes are as good as the corresponding CaMiNiPentax-lenses. The construction of aperture ring, however, is a serious drawback.

Stephan


PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of my fave 24mm Lenses, it's the latest, F22 Version, which is nowadays rare to find. Perfect on a APS-C Camera, for ~36mm FoV...or 24mm on FF, as Landscape Lens. I do keep mine since >10 years. Wink Just ordered a new K&F Konica AR eMount Adapter for this Lens (v2), because my older one wasn't perfect with the flange distance. The later, current K&F Adapters come into a square Plastikbox, no longer into a cheap 08/15 Paperbox. So it's perfect for longterm storage, when not needed, and the quality is also a bit better from these newer adapters, i am using them for many years, basically, since my NEX-5....when they came out, being order-able into germany from Asia.


PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The last version was a tokina made lens?


PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2018 1:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

papasito wrote:
The last version was a tokina made lens?



Yes.


PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 6:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, but it's considered better, than the older, much bigger F16 design made by Konica.


PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

doomed-forever wrote:
Yes, but it's considered better, than the older, much bigger F16 design made by Konica.



I have both and my Konica 7/7 lens is a much better performer than my Tokina. Sample variation maybe.


PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DigiChromeEd wrote:
doomed-forever wrote:
Yes, but it's considered better, than the older, much bigger F16 design made by Konica.



I have both and my Konica 7/7 lens is a much better performer than my Tokina. Sample variation maybe.


So why I should pay more for a tokina lens branded as Hexanon , if I can buy the tokina with less money?


PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Hexanon made by Tokina are Tokina designs and can be found branded Tokina ? Are you sure?


PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 7:23 pm    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
guardian wrote:
An interesting review of the subject lens is found here:

http://vintage-camera-lenses.com/konica-hexanon-ar-24-mm-f2-8/

I bought one of these a while back with fungus. The fungus brought down price into my price range.

Upon arrival the lens was in splendid condition aside from the fungus. And the fungus, while surely present, was not at all overwhelming. That is to say, the lens is wholly usable as is.

But of course lens fungus worsens with the passage of time. It has been a quandary for me whether or not to attempt dismantling and cleaning the lens, risking in the process spoiling a perfectly usable and highly desirable lens.


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored proprrly.
References? Fungi will continue to grow unless conditions are met to PREVENT their growth. Given oxygen, food, and moisture they will grow. The moisture level required to prevent further growth (as opposed to requirements for spores to start) are likely to be very low indeed. If it were my lens I would place it in sunlight for at least a couple of weeks, and pack it with several desicants. I might also flood the lens with CO2 using a food preservation system. Put the lens in a zip lock and flood the zip lock with the CO2 then seal.


PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2018 8:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

jamaeolus wrote:
visualopsins wrote:
guardian wrote:
An interesting review of the subject lens is found here:

http://vintage-camera-lenses.com/konica-hexanon-ar-24-mm-f2-8/

I bought one of these a while back with fungus. The fungus brought down price into my price range.

Upon arrival the lens was in splendid condition aside from the fungus. And the fungus, while surely present, was not at all overwhelming. That is to say, the lens is wholly usable as is.

But of course lens fungus worsens with the passage of time. It has been a quandary for me whether or not to attempt dismantling and cleaning the lens, risking in the process spoiling a perfectly usable and highly desirable lens.


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored proprrly.
References? Fungi will continue to grow unless conditions are met to PREVENT their growth. Given oxygen, food, and moisture they will grow. The moisture level required to prevent further growth (as opposed to requirements for spores to start) are likely to be very low indeed. If it were my lens I would place it in sunlight for at least a couple of weeks, and pack it with several desicants. I might also flood the lens with CO2 using a food preservation system. Put the lens in a zip lock and flood the zip lock with the CO2 then seal.


Lenses I have stored. You may be correct, however I have not noticed any further growth, if any. Pelican cases with periodically renewed silica gel.

CO2? Plants thrive in CO2. Fungus?


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 9:23 am    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored properly.


Lens fungus mainly grows on fat (from focusing helicoids) spread over an lens surface: No fat on the lens surface => no fungus growth possible.

I guess that some of the special fats used in more expensive lenses is simply too toxic to allow spore growth. Some barium soaps were used as a part of special fats at Leica (and maybe elsewhere). Barium is quite toxic, and barium salts are used as fungicides.

I have a Nikkor 2/135mm where a small piece of organic material sits on the surface of an inner lens. Of course fungus grows on it quite well. And f course other lenses sitting on the same shelf close to that "fungus lens" are not being infected: Their lens surfaces are clean, and the fungus spores dont't have the necessary substrate to grow on.

Stephan


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:21 am    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
visualopsins wrote:


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored properly.


Lens fungus mainly grows on fat (from focusing helicoids) spread over an lens surface: No fat on the lens surface => no fungus growth possible.

I guess that some of the special fats used in more expensive lenses is simply too toxic to allow spore growth. Some barium soaps were used as a part of special fats at Leica (and maybe elsewhere). Barium is quite toxic, and barium salts are used as fungicides.

I have a Nikkor 2/135mm where a small piece of organic material sits on the surface of an inner lens. Of course fungus grows on it quite well. And f course other lenses sitting on the same shelf close to that "fungus lens" are not being infected: Their lens surfaces are clean, and the fungus spores dont't have the necessary substrate to grow on.

Stephan


...and how many people have carried food with their camera gear on a hike or whatever Rolling Eyes


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 11:52 am    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

Excalibur wrote:


...and how many people have carried food with their camera gear on a hike or whatever Rolling Eyes


Usually the grease doesn't come out of the lens, does it? That shouldn't be a major problem. I'm careful though when dismantling lenses.

Much worse: the use of Chromium for the tanning of leather, e. g. in the 50s Nikon rangefinder cameras.

Stephan


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 2:48 pm    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:
jamaeolus wrote:
visualopsins wrote:
guardian wrote:
An interesting review of the subject lens is found here:

http://vintage-camera-lenses.com/konica-hexanon-ar-24-mm-f2-8/

I bought one of these a while back with fungus. The fungus brought down price into my price range.

Upon arrival the lens was in splendid condition aside from the fungus. And the fungus, while surely present, was not at all overwhelming. That is to say, the lens is wholly usable as is.

But of course lens fungus worsens with the passage of time. It has been a quandary for me whether or not to attempt dismantling and cleaning the lens, risking in the process spoiling a perfectly usable and highly desirable lens.


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored proprrly.
References? Fungi will continue to grow unless conditions are met to PREVENT their growth. Given oxygen, food, and moisture they will grow. The moisture level required to prevent further growth (as opposed to requirements for spores to start) are likely to be very low indeed. If it were my lens I would place it in sunlight for at least a couple of weeks, and pack it with several desicants. I might also flood the lens with CO2 using a food preservation system. Put the lens in a zip lock and flood the zip lock with the CO2 then seal.


Lenses I have stored. You may be correct, however I have not noticed any further growth, if any. Pelican cases with periodically renewed silica gel.

CO2? Plants thrive in CO2. Fungus?
fungi are not plants . They eukaryotic ("true cells "as oppposed to bacteria) but in a whole different order than plants. They use complex organics such as sugars and proteins from rotting plants (or the layer of material we call coatings!) for nutrients. They convert that to growth by "burning" oxygen. Your pelican case deprived them of their oxidizer. Source 300 level bio classes in pharmacy prep courses.


PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2018 6:28 pm    Post subject: Re: Konica Hexanon AR 24 mm 2.8 lens review Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
visualopsins wrote:


Lens fungus does not "worsen" if lens is stored properly.


Lens fungus mainly grows on fat (from focusing helicoids) spread over an lens surface: No fat on the lens surface => no fungus growth possible.

I guess that some of the special fats used in more expensive lenses is simply too toxic to allow spore growth. Some barium soaps were used as a part of special fats at Leica (and maybe elsewhere). Barium is quite toxic, and barium salts are used as fungicides.

I have a Nikkor 2/135mm where a small piece of organic material sits on the surface of an inner lens. Of course fungus grows on it quite well. And f course other lenses sitting on the same shelf close to that "fungus lens" are not being infected: Their lens surfaces are clean, and the fungus spores dont't have the necessary substrate to grow on.

Stephan


https://www.ck12.org/biology/fungi-nutrition/lesson/How-Fungi-Eat-BIO/

More than food is required for growth.

Lens fungus grows on organic dust.

Sunlight/UV doesn't normally reach inside helicals.


PostPosted: Sun Oct 07, 2018 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

memetph wrote:
The Hexanon made by Tokina are Tokina designs and can be found branded Tokina ? Are you sure?

Generally speaking, of the 15 Tokina-made Hexanons, all but three were Konica designs. The three exceptions are the 28-135/4.6, 80-200/4 and 80-200/4.5 zooms. All three were readily available in most mounts of the day as Tokina lenses. Their construction also indicates that they were designed from the outset with many different mounts in mind.
The Tokina-made Hexanon 24mm is a Konica design. Although it shows some external similarities of a stylistic nature with its Tokina RMC counterpart, technically they are different lenses.
The Tokina RMC is a 7/6 construction, with an aperture of 2.8-16, a closest focusing distance 27cm, and a filter diameter of 52mm.
The Hexanon is a 8/8 construction, with an aperture of 2.8-22, a closest focusing distance of 25cm, and a filter diameter of 55mm.


PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wouldn't freezing the lens kill off fungus?


PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

martinsmith99 wrote:
Wouldn't freezing the lens kill off fungus?

Unless I am mistaken, sub-zero temperatures don't kill off fungus (at least not most strains) but merely puts it in hibernation, so to speak.
But fungus will only spread under the right conditions (primarily humidity and darkness). I've had a lens with some fungus on the elements, but it hasn't spread in years.


PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

konicamera wrote:
Generally speaking, of the 15 Tokina-made Hexanons, all but three were Konica designs. The three exceptions are the 28-135/4.6, 80-200/4 and 80-200/4.5 zooms. All three were readily available in most mounts of the day as Tokina lenses. Their construction also indicates that they were designed from the outset with many different mounts in mind.
The Tokina-made Hexanon 24mm is a Konica design. Although it shows some external similarities of a stylistic nature with its Tokina RMC counterpart, technically they are different lenses.
The Tokina RMC is a 7/6 construction, with an aperture of 2.8-16, a closest focusing distance 27cm, and a filter diameter of 52mm.
The Hexanon is a 8/8 construction, with an aperture of 2.8-22, a closest focusing distance of 25cm, and a filter diameter of 55mm.

Is there anyone writing a book on Konica... <nudge> <nudge> Wink


PostPosted: Wed Oct 10, 2018 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RnR wrote:
konicamera wrote:
Generally speaking, of the 15 Tokina-made Hexanons, all but three were Konica designs. The three exceptions are the 28-135/4.6, 80-200/4 and 80-200/4.5 zooms. All three were readily available in most mounts of the day as Tokina lenses. Their construction also indicates that they were designed from the outset with many different mounts in mind.
The Tokina-made Hexanon 24mm is a Konica design. Although it shows some external similarities of a stylistic nature with its Tokina RMC counterpart, technically they are different lenses.
The Tokina RMC is a 7/6 construction, with an aperture of 2.8-16, a closest focusing distance 27cm, and a filter diameter of 52mm.
The Hexanon is a 8/8 construction, with an aperture of 2.8-22, a closest focusing distance of 25cm, and a filter diameter of 55mm.

Is there anyone writing a book on Konica... <nudge> <nudge> Wink


One of the contributors to the old Konica SLR discussion list was talking of putting a "Konica Compendium" together, but has probably given up on it. <wink> <wink> Wink