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My first dslr options
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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 11:14 am    Post subject: My first dslr options Reply with quote

I had my eyes on the nikon d7200 untill the d7500 came out. Now i am confused as to which one i should go for. I mostly do landscape, macro,long exposures, light paintings and sometimes events.

How huge are the differences? It will be a while until i buy a full frame. With that in mind should i invest in the d7500 directly or go for the d7200 with some lens options like the 40mm f2.8 micro. If i go for the d7500 i can't buy can't additional lenses due to my budget.

I wanted to go for the pentax k3ii but there's no proper service in India.

What are my other options?


I didn't find the right solution from the Internet.
References:https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/59604293

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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally I think the time of DSLRs is over, I would go mirrorless...


PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This forum is mostly about using vintage manual focus lenses. Since you're posting here I assume this is what interests you as well. In that case, there's only one sensible way to go, and that's mirrorless. With a budget of 2000 (as stated in the other thread), the best you can get is a Sony A7 II, with some cash to spare.


PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2017 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

miran wrote:
This forum is mostly about using vintage manual focus lenses. Since you're posting here I assume this is what interests you as well. In that case, there's only one sensible way to go, and that's mirrorless. With a budget of 2000 (as stated in the other thread), the best you can get is a Sony A7 II, with some cash to spare.


Could someone please explain briefly why a mirrorless camera is more useful than a DSLR if one intends to use manual-focus lenses? If there is already a post explaining this a link to the post would be enough. Thanks.


PostPosted: Fri May 26, 2017 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

chhayanat wrote:
Could someone please explain briefly why a mirrorless camera is more useful than a DSLR if one intends to use manual-focus lenses? If there is already a post explaining this a link to the post would be enough. Thanks.

Mirrorless cameras are recommended not for manual focus lenses as such but rather for vintage lenses (which also tend to be manual).Number one reason is you can adapt nearly every vintage lens in existence because of the shorter flange distance of the mount. With DSLRs you are much more limited but if you are able to mount YOUR selected range of lenses to YOUR selected DSLR, then there's no argument. Only when you are interested in adapting lenses with various different mounts, then mirrorless has the advantage.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No camera takes great photos. Only great photographers.
I wouldn't recommend spending a lot on gear at this moment, since you say that you are a beginner. Photography is an art, and it relies more on the photographer than it does on the gear. If you believe that the gear is more important, then you might be sorely disappointed; I know that I was. I would suggest starting out with an inexpensive, but flexible camera, and then seeing if you really like photography and if you have, or can develop, an artistic eye.

https://bitgid.com/


Last edited by BitGid on Tue Mar 13, 2018 7:36 am; edited 2 times in total


PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

miran wrote:
chhayanat wrote:
Could someone please explain briefly why a mirrorless camera is more useful than a DSLR if one intends to use manual-focus lenses? If there is already a post explaining this a link to the post would be enough. Thanks.

Mirrorless cameras are recommended not for manual focus lenses as such but rather for vintage lenses (which also tend to be manual).Number one reason is you can adapt nearly every vintage lens in existence because of the shorter flange distance of the mount. With DSLRs you are much more limited but if you are able to mount YOUR selected range of lenses to YOUR selected DSLR, then there's no argument. Only when you are interested in adapting lenses with various different mounts, then mirrorless has the advantage.


Not only that, but DSLR focusing screens are not very suitable for manual focus. The live-view focus peaking on mirrorless is excellent in place of that, and one has the option of sensor-based image stabilisation on some cameras.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Note this is an old message thread from last Spring. victorgrant hasn't been back.