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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2022 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There were match needle metering finders for the Nikon F-2, which are by far the most common, and were slightly cheaper.
It is still my preferred nikon finder.

The M/D-4 for the F-3 may have been an ergonomic wonder, but it sure was not a fully thought-out design.
There was no such thing as taking the winder off mid-roll. It could be done with a changing bag- otherwise the film on the take up spool would be re-exposed. The thread-in motor drive cap on the camera body was a poorly conceived work-around.
Mine with full battery pack made for a heavy, and bulky camera.
I really don't miss the F-3 at all.

-D.S.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2022 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ cooltouch:

Thanks a lot for - again! - sharing your vast experience. It's always a joy to read your stories, and I hope you'll continue Wink.

Sadly, I'm too "young" to have real experience with these most beautiful SLRs from the 1970s and early 1980s. Back then when the New F-1 came out I was barely 12 years old, and using my father's Mamiya ZE ... the only "real" thing back then were the advertising brochures for the New F-1 and the Leica M6, which I both kept with me all the time (and especially during boring high school lessons)! The brochure for the Nikon F3 didn't really convince me, and so I never really thought of getting one when I was 16 (and considering buying my first professional SLR) ...

Of course these days I can play with all those nice SLRs, but your experience is way more profound - either having used them as a professional photographer, or having sold them as a camera dealer.

Thanks again!

S


PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2022 2:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the kind words, Steve. Back in the 80s, when I was most heavily involved with Canon gear, my chosen cameras were 10 years old or more. My first F-1 was the first version, and I bought it because of positive experiences I had with an FTb. I bought it used, and it looked like it had seen hard duty as a hockey puck. But everything worked and continued to work for as long as I owned it. I bought my first F2 in 1989, and it was a "71", so it was almost 20 years old. I still own that camera, and like the F-1, it has never missed a lick. So I guess what I'm saying is, I wasn't playing with cutting-edge gear either. If anything, I was being intentionally anachronistic.

Doc, when I refer to "match needle metering" I'm referring to a specific metering type, where two needles are brought together to indicate correct exposure, such as is found on the Canon FTb, F-1, Pentax KX, Nikon FE, and others. I too own a couple of F2 DP-1 finders, but they have a single needle that is centered to indicate correct exposure. In the end, both systems accomplish the same thing. For me, I think it's what I got used to early on, and I just preferred to stick with it.

The F3 was hardly the only camera that couldn't have the motor removed mid-roll without exposing the film. With the original Canon F-1, the entire bottom plate of the camera had to be removed to mount the motor. And the New F-1 didn't fare much better. It's been quite a while since I've removed the drive from my New F-1, but as I dimly recall, there are at least three caps that must be removed to mount the drive, so chances are it wouldn't survive that test, either. But I don't recall ever having a situation where I needed to remove any drive mid-roll anyway, so that's been a non-issue for me. In terms of motor drives in general, when it comes to simplicity of use, I find the Nikon MD12 and I believe also the Minolta MD-1 to be really hard to beat. Just mount and go. Canon's MD MA (for the A-1 and AE-1 Program) is almost as easy, but it's a two-step process to mount and dismount that drive.

Heh, I've never regarded the F3 with MD4 as a heavyweight. Not after spending many a day with an old F-1 with motor slung around my neck.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2022 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:


Doc, when I refer to "match needle metering" I'm referring to a specific metering type, where two needles are brought together to indicate correct exposure, such as is found on the Canon FTb, F-1, Pentax KX, Nikon FE, and others. I too own a couple of F2 DP-1 finders, but they have a single needle that is centered to indicate correct exposure. In the end, both systems accomplish the same thing. For me, I think it's what I got used to early on, and I just preferred to stick with it.

The F3 was hardly the only camera that couldn't have the motor removed mid-roll without exposing the film. With the original Canon F-1, the entire bottom plate of the camera had to be removed to mount the motor. And the New F-1 didn't fare much better. It's been quite a while since I've removed the drive from my New F-1, but as I dimly recall, there are at least three caps that must be removed to mount the drive, so chances are it wouldn't survive that test, either. But I don't recall ever having a situation where I needed to remove any drive mid-roll anyway, so that's been a non-issue for me. In terms of motor drives in general, when it comes to simplicity of use, I find the Nikon MD12 and I believe also the Minolta MD-1 to be really hard to beat. Just mount and go. Canon's MD MA (for the A-1 and AE-1 Program) is almost as easy, but it's a two-step process to mount and dismount that drive.

Heh, I've never regarded the F3 with MD4 as a heavyweight. Not after spending many a day with an old F-1 with motor slung around my neck.


The M/D-12 and FM/Fe is a very versatile combination.
The old 12 is still my favorite drive, even though a bit on the slow side.
That is actually one of the lighter drives to come down the photographic pike.
I actually "grew up" on the nikkormat FT series metering needle systems, so the similar display in the DP finders was no great hurdle.
I used an FE for quite a few years, and it is one of the better metering displays that I've used.
I still have an intense dislike of red l.e.d.'s in a camera viewfinder, so the FM series I've always passed on.
All my FE's are gone now. I gave the last to my sister, whose Canon AE-1 died electronically.
From my personal experience, the FE is a much better long term survivor than the FE-2.
The collection is now pared down to a mint Nikkormat FTN, a good condition nikkormat FT-2, and a mint chrome F-2.
That's down quite a bit from what was clogging the closet...
The F-3's 80-20 center weighting was one of the things that led to it's purchase for me.
I have come to believe that as technically good as the F-3 was, it simply wasn't the camera for me.
I hope whoever ended up with my old F-3 and drive gets as much use and enjoyment out of it as possible.
My personal slr Nirvana is still the F-2, warts and all Wink

-D.S.


PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2022 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

#1


#2


One of the lesser known DKL leaf shutter cameras, this one has a working shutter but a dead meter. I was thinking of trying a repair, but usually my nerves fail me on anything rare or valuable.


PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2022 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alun Thomas wrote:

One of the lesser known DKL leaf shutter cameras, this one has a working shutter but a dead meter. I was thinking of trying a repair, but usually my nerves fail me on anything rare or valuable.


Never heard of the "Edixa Electronica"! Thanks for sharing Wink

S

Yep, I too prefer to try to repair only common stuff, not the rarities ...!


PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2022 1:00 pm    Post subject: Ambi Silette Reply with quote

I learned abut this camera in the early 2000s and was curious about it. The lines for 35-50-90mm lenses are bright and work great.

Here is with the 130/4 Telinear lens that needs a special viewfinder


Ambi-Silette and 130/4


PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2022 1:01 pm    Post subject: Spotmatic F Reply with quote

After several years of negotiating my father in law agreed to pass-on his SP-F
He bought it new in the mid70s and has used it a lot, has some lovely brassing
The 35/3.5 is a wonderful piece of glass!


PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2022 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My OM-2N and the two silver noses I own.



PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2022 5:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This OM-2SP ate batteries like candies, luckily of the LR-44 type. So supply is still good, I might try a color negative film with it once the Ilford in the OM-3 is spent. I bought this camera in the 90s, when everybody was keen on autofocus, for very little money.



PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2022 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Konica Autoreflex TC. It misses some of the features of the Autoreflex T and T3, but it is in weight and size comparable to an Olympus body. According to konicafiles.com, TC´s with capital written "KONICA" were the first version and produced from early 1976 until September 1977, and about serial number 380.000 the inscription on the viewfinder changed to small letters after the K. This camera has production number 378.324.

stevemark wrote:

The camera - even though marked "Porst" - is a Fujica STX-1. It's a fully mechanical SLR with a limited set of shutter speeds from 1/2s to 1/700s, somehow similar to the ubiquitous Konica TC (which goes from 1/1000s to 1/15s). The Fuji however has a horizontal cloth shutter, while the Konica has a vertical metal shutter.
S


Steve, from your post about the Porst: the TC goes down to 1/8sec exposure time - and there´s still "B" Wink



PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2022 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ZuikosHexanonsandVivitars wrote:
My OM-2N and the two silver noses I own.

A very nice camera for sure! Sadly the Zuiko lenses are quite scarce here in Switzerland (apart from ubiquituous 1.8/50, 3.5/28 and 3.5/135 Zuikos), and in addition tho the 1.8/50 and the 3.5/28 I only have a 3.5/21, the 1.4/50, the 2.8/135 and the 4.5/300 (plus a few zooms).

ZuikosHexanonsandVivitars wrote:
This OM-2SP ate batteries like candies, luckily of the LR-44 type. So supply is still good, I might try a color negative film with it once the Ilford in the OM-3 is spent. I bought this camera in the 90s, when everybody was keen on autofocus, for very little money.

OM-3 and 2.8/180 ... what a beautiful combination! I've never seen a 2.8/180, and i would love to see how it performs since its construction is a bit different from most other fast 180mm / 200mm lenses.

ZuikosHexanonsandVivitars wrote:

Steve, from your post about the Porst: the TC goes down to 1/8sec exposure time - and there´s still "B" Wink


OUCH. Thanks for correcting my mistake. I actually never really took pictures with a Konica TC, even though I have several samples (both "KONICA" and "Konica"). While mechanical SLR usually have a reputation of being reliable and sturdy, most of my T / T2 / T3 Konicas have some issues, usually a blocked shutter. Later T-3N / T4 / TC models seem to be more reliable, but the "newest" Konica SLRs again often have some issues.

S


PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2022 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is my little Olympus Pen F Collection.
With Pen FT in Chrome and beauty Black Version and Lenses 20mm f3.5 , 25 f2.5 , 38 f1.8 , 40 f1.4 , 42 f1.2 , 60 f1.5 , 70 f2 , 100 f3.5 , 150 f4 , 250 f5 and the 50-90 f3.5 Zoom.





PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2022 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

starbucklover69 wrote:
This is my little Olympus Pen F Collection.
. . .


Welcome, starbucklover69. That's a nice presentation of a beautiful collection!

I know little about Olympus Pen F, but I'm guessing it took you a long time to assemble your horde?
Which item was the most difficult to obtain?


PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2022 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

55 wrote:
starbucklover69 wrote:
This is my little Olympus Pen F Collection.
. . .


Welcome, starbucklover69. That's a nice presentation of a beautiful collection!

I know little about Olympus Pen F, but I'm guessing it took you a long time to assemble your horde?
Which item was the most difficult to obtain?


The 40 f1.4 and the 60 f1.5. I found the 42mm 10 years ago for 20 Swiss francs. I have been searching and collecting the Pen f series ever since. I exchanged the 60mm for 6 Minolta x700 with lenses. I ordered the PenF-Mft adapter. Comes in mid-December. I already have the adapter for the Sony.


PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2022 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

55 wrote:
starbucklover69 wrote:
This is my little Olympus Pen F Collection.
. . .


Welcome, starbucklover69. That's a nice presentation of a beautiful collection!

I know little about Olympus Pen F, but I'm guessing it took you a long time to assemble your horde?
Which item was the most difficult to obtain?


Here is a german Site for the Pen F. https://olypedia.de/index.php?title=Kategorie:PEN_F_System


PostPosted: Wed Nov 30, 2022 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

starbucklover69 wrote:
. . .
The 40 f1.4 and the 60 f1.5. I found the 42mm 10 years ago for 20 Swiss francs. I have been searching and collecting the Pen f series ever since. . .

Like 1 small I know how rewarding it is to find an item after a long search.


starbucklover69 wrote:

Here is a german Site for the Pen F. https://olypedia.de/index.php?title=Kategorie:PEN_F_System

Thank you. I never knew there were so many lenses for Pen F.


PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2022 12:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



These two cameras are both rebadged Petri cameras, marketed by Ihagee West, after they won a court case with the East German company of the same name. Their first release was the Exakta Real, using a new bayonet mount. Following that was the Twin TL, a Cosina Hi-Lite rebadge, still using the new mount. Then it was released in M42, and then following that, these two Petri cameras, based on the Petri 1/1000s M42 chassis, were released. The 55/1.8 lens on the left is a Petri made lens with a decent reputation. The one on the right looks to be made by Sankor, possibly based on previous 55/1.4 designs from other manufacturers.

The cameras are almost identical apart from the omission of the 1/1000s speed and the timer from the left hand camera. Actually there is a further difference, in the metering system. On the TL-500, the metering works anytime the stop down button is used, exactly the same as any other M42 stop down camera from that period. On the TL-1000, the meter turns on when the camera shutter is cocked, and off when the shutter is released. This setup was first featured on the Petriflex 7 camera, and is retained here. You still have to stop down manually with the same lever as on the TL-500.

This caused me some confusion when I received the TL-1000, I though the meter was defective. When I took the top cover off to try and fix the perceived 'fault', I noticed the camera is quite nicely made, despite the lowly reputation (not) enjoyed by Petri cameras.