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Tairs-3s problem
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:47 am    Post subject: Tairs-3s problem Reply with quote

I have found a Tair-3s lens made in the late 80s that seems to be in like new condition, but the aperture does not seem to work correctly. The blades are not stuck, but they don't seem to close or open correctly. How easy is to fix such a problem?


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 4:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did not quite understand the problem of your lens. So I limit myself to a reference to the lens assembly sequence. To disassemble the lens is not difficult. Disassembly is carried out in the reverse order.

http://liveviewer.ru/0911-2013/razborka-tair-3fs/


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just asking : did you armed the aperture mechanism before trying to change the aperture?
If you did, try posting some pics relevant for your problem.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Need a better description of what is happening, vs. what you expect to happen, ideally pictures or video would be best.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I did arm the aperture mechanism before trying to change the aperture.

Here are two pictures showing the problem, first with half aperture open and second with full aperture open:




PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi kyrcy,

That looks like rust on the blades?


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TAo2 wrote:
Hi kyrcy,

That looks like rust on the blades?

I think it's oil.

At least one blade seems to be loose and is probably causing the problem.

I could take the lens for service, but if it is a simple task I could try repair it myself.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you are not used to dismantle lenses or you are unsure in doing this, leave the job to a professional, but if you want to give it a try this should be a good start:
http://forum.mflenses.com/tair-3-300-4-5-part-of-the-photosniper-repair-guide-t27056,highlight,%2Btair+%2Brepair.html


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lucca1x wrote:
If you are not used to dismantle lenses or you are unsure in doing this, leave the job to a professional, but if you want to give it a try this should be a good start:
http://forum.mflenses.com/tair-3-300-4-5-part-of-the-photosniper-repair-guide-t27056,highlight,%2Btair+%2Brepair.html

I am not used to dismantle lenses and for sure I am unsure in doing this, but it will probably cost as much as I paid for the lens itself if not more to repair it.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is common problem since there are three strong springs to quick step down. Never close aperture with quick release from wide open to F8 and higher, if apertures aren't clean and tested.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 17, 2017 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From what I read I understand that I need to completely disassemble the lens in order to reach the diaphragm. Do I risk messing something up while doing so such as infinity focus?


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I repaired the same breakdown of Tair two years ago. I do not remember the details of the repair. But I can draw your attention to the following circumstances: 1 - there was no problem with infinity; 2 - the screws are very brittle. It is necessary to have some stock of such screws before starting the repair; 3 - it is also desirable to have a spare spring. At me one spring has lost the elastic properties. I replaced this spring. 4 - it is necessary to mark the part of the lens with the marker when disassembling it. Otherwise, there may be problems opening the aperture. The diaphragm may not open completely if it is not assembled correctly.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sergtum wrote:
I repaired the same breakdown of Tair two years ago. I do not remember the details of the repair. But I can draw your attention to the following circumstances: 1 - there was no problem with infinity; 2 - the screws are very brittle. It is necessary to have some stock of such screws before starting the repair; 3 - it is also desirable to have a spare spring. At me one spring has lost the elastic properties. I replaced this spring. 4 - it is necessary to mark the part of the lens with the marker when disassembling it. Otherwise, there may be problems opening the aperture. The diaphragm may not open completely if it is not assembled correctly.

I have no spare screws or a spring and I very much doubt if I could find any to buy locally. What is the purpose of marking the various parts? Just to remember the order to assembly or are there specific positions for some parts? And do I need to follow all steps in the link you posted in order to reach the diaphragm?


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Marking is needed for proper assembly. To mark it is necessary extractable from each other details. Then put them in the right place. Only as an example, the marking of the Triothar during its repair:

http://www.digicamclub.de/showthread.php?t=8586&s=9a9a94272ebf163a611b5342761e7d62&highlight=Triotar


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could it be possible to just remove the Glassware and dribble some 'lighter fluid' onto the Iris and 'work' it open and closed a few times,without actually disassembling the bodywork etc?


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eddie46 wrote:
Could it be possible to just remove the Glassware and dribble some 'lighter fluid' onto the Iris and 'work' it open and closed a few times,without actually disassembling the bodywork etc?


I doubt that. The blades are a bit rusty (it's not grease or oil...), they must be cleaned on both sides and more important one of the pins of the hanging blade it's out of place (hopefully not broken) and must be seated correctly.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sergtum wrote:
Marking is needed for proper assembly. To mark it is necessary extractable from each other details. Then put them in the right place. Only as an example, the marking of the Triothar during its repair:

http://www.digicamclub.de/showthread.php?t=8586&s=9a9a94272ebf163a611b5342761e7d62&highlight=Triotar


What I am suppose to be marking? And how do I mark a lens with a black body?

I am not sure if I should start practicing with disassembly using this lens.

It's not that I paid much for it, but it will be such a waste to throw it away if something goes wrong.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recommend marking with a sharpy. It will come off with isopropyl alcohol. It may not be easy to put the lens back with the correct orientation (ie front to back may LOOK the same but be optically different). I have never repaired an iris before but I recommend doing some web searches of what is involved. Most are likely to have a similar kind of construction if you can't find Tair 3 specific images. Many tiny parts are frequently encountered in some of these lenses (I have no Tair lens so I can't address that, but I have taken some Topcon, and Asahi and Minolta and Canon lenses apart) Take photos with your cell phone to remind yourself where things go. Disassembly should be accomplished on a large table with clean white paper on top to assist in finding tiny parts that jump out of your hands. Use a muffin tin or egg crate to keep small parts in the order you took them out. Many small parts may look similar but not be interchangeable (eg different screw lengths, similar springs etc). I noticed there was a Tair 3 for sale "For Parts" on ebay right now. might be worth investigating. I have used multiple "parts' lenses to get one complete lens in the past as well. Good luck.


PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I asked and it will cost up to 100 euro for a professional to repair the lens depending on the amount of time it will take. Does this sound reasonable?

Last edited by kyrcy on Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:29 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sergtum gives good advice, backed with experience...

I think (s)he refers to marking the position of the focusing helicals where they separate, so that position can be duplicated on reassembly -- necessary, because, as there are multiple threads, there are multiple starting positions, but only one position is correct for proper focusing.

Check with your local camera shoppe -- somebody there may be able to fix it, or knows someone.


PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

visualopsins wrote:

I think (s)he refers to marking the position of the focusing helicals where they separate...


This is very important with most lenses but the Tair 3s has no focus helical.

As for the 100 euro for servicing the lens it depends . It's a 2 hours job at most including 2 - 3 coffee breaks, but the charge varies in different services and countries .
I have another suggestion for you if you are not in hurry : try the lens as is, with the faulty blade, don't change the aperture. If you are lucky will get some pictures good enough to tell if you like the lens or not.
Then take a decision.


PostPosted: Fri Jul 21, 2017 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Embarassed

Here's some pics to compare
http://forum.mflenses.com/tair-3-300mm-an-impressive-performance-t40947.html