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Meyer Optik Trioplan 100mm f2.8 - grease on aperture blades?
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 4:17 am    Post subject: Meyer Optik Trioplan 100mm f2.8 - grease on aperture blades? Reply with quote

Advice needed please.
I just purchased on EBay a Trioplan 100mm f2.8 Meyer Optik vintage lens that was described as having oil free blades.
Inspection through the front lens with a flashlight reveals patches of a brown substance that appears to be dry (see photos). Is this normal or could this be dried grease?
The aperture blades currently operate smoothly.
There is also substantial micro dust on the internal elements, but this does not seem to affect image quality.
Should I consider returning the lens or are these apparent defects normal?
Also are repairs to the Trioplan 100 easy to carry out for a novice?
Thanks in advance for any help.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That really looks more like rust. Definitely not oil. Re: returning - that's entirely up to you. If you feel that you could get a better copy for the kind of money you've paid - sure, return it, or it will gnaw on you.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 6:01 am    Post subject: Re: Meyer Optik Trioplan 100mm f2.8 - grease on aperture bla Reply with quote

BasilB wrote:
Advice needed please.
I just purchased on EBay a Trioplan 100mm f2.8 Meyer Optik vintage lens that was described as having oil free blades.
Inspection through the front lens with a flashlight reveals patches of a brown substance that appears to be dry (see photos). Is this normal or could this be dried grease?
The aperture blades currently operate smoothly.
There is also substantial micro dust on the internal elements, but this does not seem to affect image quality.
Should I consider returning the lens or are these apparent defects normal?
Also are repairs to the Trioplan 100 easy to carry out for a novice?
Thanks in advance for any help.

#1


#2


#3


PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your reply.
Good to know it is not oil.
From the photos it does look a bit like rust but when seen with a flashlight it is definitely not rust.
It looks like a shiny brown viscous substance more like dried glue or lacquer (some parts have a raised surfaces as if they have run and then dried) - see additional photo for a better representation.
Can I assume that this condition will not cause future problems with the aperture blades seizing?
Thanks again

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd say it is old grease which made its way to the iris, which other "viscous substance"
would there exist in a lens? Wink


PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It takes very little interference with the movement of the blades to make them bend and jump out of their location. With luck, they spring into their flat state and can be cleaned and put back into place. In my opinion that lens needs to be opened up and cleaned properly.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you to all for the helpful replies.

Looks like I will have to return the item.

For interest can any one please recommend a good Vintage lens repair/cleaning specialist in Canada together with an approximate cost of cleaning the grease from the aperture blades and removal of micro-dust from inner lens elements?

Thanks in advance.