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Tamron SP 24-48 13A
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is a nice example of an A1 Olivier, I got it off a dodgey sounding character on a manual lens forum some time ago, Lordy, Lewdly, Lanky or some such... It was for a student niece of mine but I gave her one of my eBay refurbs and kept this one for me. I don't feel in the least bit guilty Wink Smile


PostPosted: Fri Mar 24, 2017 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Tamron rubber hood 25F for SP 35-80mm 01A fits the 24-48mm.
It has an outer ring screw.
Maybe too short, but it's better than nothing.

[Edit] : Maybe not too short as we can see the original here. It's a tulip one.
http://themanualphotographer.co.uk/tamron-adaptall-2-sp-24-48mm-f3-5-8-13a/sp24-48mm/

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think that you will get vignetting at 24mm in the corners with that lens hood.
Try it and see - it should work fine down to about 30mm or so
Better than nothing of course
T


PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just tried with the 5D full format.
No vignetting at all at 24mm and further.
Flare is reduced but still there at +30 and -30 facing the light.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When this thread popped up again, it reminded me that I owed this thread a few pics.

These were shot with the Tamron 24-48 on my Pentax MX. Tri-X souped in D-76. I don't understand why these pics are so grainy. Usually Tri-X in D-76 doesn't have this much grain. But oh well, it is what it is. Isn't film fun!






Here's a shot of my MX with the 24-48 attached. I actually took the pic to show that a Canon eyecup fits a Pentax viewfinder eyepiece just fine. And it does. It's permanently affixed to my MX now.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael, I hope you don't mind, but I've applied the newest version of "Neat Image" (automatic setting) on your first picture just to see what it can do:



PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Thomas, I d/l'd a demo copy of Neat Image recently and have played around with it some. It's a nice tool. Most often when I de-noise a photo, I use Topaz DeNoise. It works as well as most any others I've seen. Here's the same pic after I passed it through Topaz's DeNoise plugin:



Is there much of a difference? Eh, maybe a little, but not enough for me to worry about.

BTW, the reason why I uploaded the unprocessed images was because I wanted to show them "as is," without additional processing, as they would appear if I had printed them out on an enlarger.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
Is there much of a difference?


Not really. Topaz seems to be fine as well. Is it likewise easy to apply or is manual tweaking necessary?


PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems to me that Neat Image is sharper.
But they're impressive, both of them.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, the Neater Image version does appear to be a bit sharper. But the Topaz plugin also has sharpening and anti-blur controls. I was conservative with both, fearing artifacts if I cranked it up too far.

Thomas, the Topaz plugin is dead simple to use. Much easier than Noise Ninja, which I've always considered to be "just ok." I click on a preset value that determines the amount of correction to apply, and then if I want to adjust any of the settings, I can, but with the exception of slightly tweaking the sharpening and blur controls I usually leave it alone.


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2023 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello to all,
First post! I am using the Tamron 24-48 on a Panasonic S5 and I NEED to screw filters on!
The backstory: I had the S5 modified to full spectrum - the hotmirror in front of the sensor was removed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A64IRljvEaY

This also gives better results with vintage lenses calculated for celluloid,
as the light does not need to go through a sometimes
thick stack of glass before hitting the film / sensor plane.

https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2014/07/sensor-stack-thickness-part-iii-the-summary/

I am using step up rings to adapt the 82mm filters to my manual lens collection.
So I cannot use the hood.
Got a step-up ring that could probably be pressed on the Tamron 24-48 with a lot of force and stay there.
Or even find a way to freeze the step up ring down to -200 degress ceslsius (it should shrink about 0.2 mm) and put it on the front.
Anyway, I assume both methods need the Tamron 24-48 to be disassembled.
It looks like the front is part of the barrel / tube and not an extra ring.
Can this barrel be removed without misaligning everything?
Are there service manuals available?
All the best,
many thanks,
Herbert


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2023 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi the lens has a 77mm filter ring. Source:

http://www.adaptall-2.com/lenses/13A.html


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2023 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The lens itself has a metal front bar which is shaped like a tulip (see iameg at adaptall-2.com). The 77 mm filter thread is found on the plastic sun shade, not on the lens itself.

S


PostPosted: Thu Sep 07, 2023 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Slalom wrote:
Hi the lens has a 77mm filter ring. Source:

http://www.adaptall-2.com/lenses/13A.html

Not really - a 58mm step up ring could fit into the tulip-shaped metal front bar
if Tamron had decided to mill helical steps inside the tulip.
I think in some forum someone tried to attach a filter
not realising that what looks like a thread inside the tulip isn't a thread at all.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2023 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right It's 55mm but noting will thread in because the grooves run parallel, they don't spiral.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2023 9:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Clamp on...


PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2023 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

D1N0 wrote:
Right It's 55mm but noting will thread in because the grooves run parallel, they don't spiral.

I know. But I did manage to "screw" on a 58mm-82mm step up ring.
In my case a filter ring is mandatory , because I modified my camera to full spectrum - It can't shoot without filters,
for visible light or infrared. Of course the focus and zoom rings need to be protected from excessive force needed.
So i did put double adhesive tape on the front (tulip) tube and used a rubber ring (normally for opening jars) to get some grip.
"Screwed" the ring on, with all strength, as far as I could. The thread will cut it´s way, at least for a full turn, until it gets stuck.

Later some cleaning work is needed, to get the sticky residue from the adhesive tape off, rust roll the ball of tape over the metal,
the clean with alcohol. A thin hair tie can be used to prevent light to sneak in from the side of the tulip (not pictured)
No vignetting at 24mm, at least on a Panasonic S5.
BTW, someone with access to a lathe could even mill a thread cutter for 58mm, but this would be expensive.
Maybe some repairers even had such a tool to repair dented threads. But this is just guessing.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2023 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not use a 62-82mm step-up ring and modify it with some DIY drilling & filing of a couple of slots in the 62mm protruding thread such that it twist onto the same bayonet ridges that the original lens-hood twists onto?

Intuitively I would utilise those protruding bayonet ridges to somehow mount an 82mm screw-filter holder...


PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2023 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RokkorDoctor wrote:
Why not use a 62-82mm step-up ring and modify it with some DIY drilling & filing of a couple of slots in the 62mm protruding thread such that it twist onto the same bayonet ridges that the original lens-hood twists onto?

Intuitively I would utilise those protruding bayonet ridges to somehow mount an 82mm screw-filter holder...


Because you would need a 3D mill and special tools to mill the slots.
The outside bayonet ridges will not "catch" a threat, but the inner profile does,
because it tapers towards the outer edge. The difference in diameter is only 0.4mm at the thickest parts.


PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2023 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Herbert wrote:
RokkorDoctor wrote:
Why not use a 62-82mm step-up ring and modify it with some DIY drilling & filing of a couple of slots in the 62mm protruding thread such that it twist onto the same bayonet ridges that the original lens-hood twists onto?

Intuitively I would utilise those protruding bayonet ridges to somehow mount an 82mm screw-filter holder...


Because you would need a 3D mill and special tools to mill the slots.
The outside bayonet ridges will not "catch" a threat, but the inner profile does,
because it tapers towards the outer edge. The difference in diameter is only 0.4mm at the thickest parts.


You don't always need a mill unless you are going for factory-machined looks. Quite accurate mechanical work can be achieved with hand-tools as long as you have accurate measuring tools and patience. Hand-files, drills, fret-saws and sanding-sticks can be quite effective on aluminium and brass; I have made many DIY mods on aluminium & brass components without using a mill.

You are probably thinking enclosed slots, but you could make open L-shaped slots in the step-up ring that catch behind the bayonet ridges. With some additional ABS or polystyrene plasticard as extra material to use it would be even easier.


PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2023 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Quite accurate mechanical work can be achieved with hand-tools as long as you have accurate measuring tools and patience. Hand-files, drills, fret-saws and sanding-sticks can be quite effective on aluminium and brass; I have made many DIY mods on aluminium & brass components without using a mill.

You are probably thinking enclosed slots, but you could make open L-shaped slots in the step-up ring that catch behind the bayonet ridges.

Well, in fact I am thinking L-shaped slots. I did built things like my camera cage and adapter box under the cam with the tools you mentioned. But screwing / unscrewing parts constantly without hassle that also need to fit without play has to be done extremely precise.


PostPosted: Mon Oct 02, 2023 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe getting another lens is an easier solution?

1) Minolta MD-III 3.5/24-35mm: small but sophisticated wideangle zoom with 10 lenses
2) Sigma 3.5-4.2/21-35mm: early superwide zoom with pretty good performance, comparable to Tamron 24-50 or Canon nFD 3.5/20-35mm L

S


PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2023 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
Maybe getting another lens is an easier solution?

1) Minolta MD-III 3.5/24-35mm: small but sophisticated wideangle zoom with 10 lenses
2) Sigma 3.5-4.2/21-35mm: early superwide zoom with pretty good performance, comparable to Tamron 24-50 or Canon nFD 3.5/20-35mm L

S

Why, when the solution was already described 5 posts ago?
A jar opener, adhesive double sided tape and step up ring for $15
against a Minolta that sells for $350?
Besides the fact that I use Canon FD exclusively, because
the Canon FD-adapter is fixed to my DIY camera rig.
The Metabones FD adapter is very rugged, it carries the weight of the FD vintage lenses
and reliefs the S5' body from any weight:

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The the box beneath the camera is DIY. It is for adapting 5V from power banks, transferring data and connecting to XLR audio from portable field mixers.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 03, 2023 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like 1 Like 1 Nice workmanship Herbert!!!


PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2023 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Herbert wrote:
stevemark wrote:
Maybe getting another lens is an easier solution?

1) Minolta MD-III 3.5/24-35mm: small but sophisticated wideangle zoom with 10 lenses
2) Sigma 3.5-4.2/21-35mm: early superwide zoom with pretty good performance, comparable to Tamron 24-50 or Canon nFD 3.5/20-35mm L

S

Why, when the solution was already described 5 posts ago?
A jar opener, adhesive double sided tape and step up ring for $15
against a Minolta that sells for $350?


350 bucks for a Minolta 24-35mm - sure??

wow ... my last MD-III 3.5/24-35 was less than 50.-- CHF, and the Sigma somwhere in the twenties ... one or two years ago, that is.

Ebay currently lists the Minolta MD 24-35mm starting at "CHF 63.-- or best offer", ... and the Sigma 21-35 "buy it now" starting at USD 33.-- (AF version) or USD 46.-- (MF version).

S