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Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 12:24 am    Post subject: Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD Reply with quote

Saw this on reddit and figured it would be of interest to some folks here,

Quote:
This is the male portion of the mount that is attached to the rear of a Micro Four Thirds lens. Dimensions were taken from the lumix G Vario 45-200mm f4-5.6 lens mount, measured by myself and my trusty 4 decimal Mitutoyo caliper. The CAD was composed in Solidworks 2013. There are STL and IGS files available. That render was composed in Keyshot.

... There are the technical drawings as well! So if you find an old school machinist whose better than using 1s and 0s, you're still covered.


http://salvagedcircuitry.com/u43-mount


PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 6:01 am    Post subject: Re: Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD Reply with quote

fuzzywuzzy wrote:
Saw this on reddit and figured it would be of interest to some folks here,

Quote:
This is the male portion of the mount that is attached to the rear of a Micro Four Thirds lens. Dimensions were taken from the lumix G Vario 45-200mm f4-5.6 lens mount, measured by myself and my trusty 4 decimal Mitutoyo caliper. The CAD was composed in Solidworks 2013. There are STL and IGS files available. That render was composed in Keyshot.

... There are the technical drawings as well! So if you find an old school machinist whose better than using 1s and 0s, you're still covered.


http://salvagedcircuitry.com/u43-mount


Oh help me GODs of the internationally standardized METRICAL system, it is in ... INCHES!!! Twisted Evil


PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 7:11 am    Post subject: Re: Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
fuzzywuzzy wrote:
Saw this on reddit and figured it would be of interest to some folks here,

Quote:
This is the male portion of the mount that is attached to the rear of a Micro Four Thirds lens. Dimensions were taken from the lumix G Vario 45-200mm f4-5.6 lens mount, measured by myself and my trusty 4 decimal Mitutoyo caliper. The CAD was composed in Solidworks 2013. There are STL and IGS files available. That render was composed in Keyshot.

... There are the technical drawings as well! So if you find an old school machinist whose better than using 1s and 0s, you're still covered.


http://salvagedcircuitry.com/u43-mount


Oh help me GODs of the internationally standardized METRICAL system, it is in ... INCHES!!! Twisted Evil


Americans often seem to be on a different planet. Smile Their 'world series' is America only & they tend not to like international! The ASTM frequently updates ISO standardized methods unilaterally...

IIRC there have been several multi million (billion?) dollar errors made in space science by mixing metric & imperial units. I think the scientist have switched to metric but the engineers often haven't.

Inches explains why 4 decimals are needed!! It's very rare to need more than 2 decimals when working in mm Smile
It does have quite a few measurements I've not made on my mounts (such as screw holes) & the angles are going to be useful.

Despite the archaic units I'm sure this file will be useful. TFS @fuzzywuzzy !


PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 12:43 pm    Post subject: Re: Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
kds315* wrote:
fuzzywuzzy wrote:
Saw this on reddit and figured it would be of interest to some folks here,

Quote:
This is the male portion of the mount that is attached to the rear of a Micro Four Thirds lens. Dimensions were taken from the lumix G Vario 45-200mm f4-5.6 lens mount, measured by myself and my trusty 4 decimal Mitutoyo caliper. The CAD was composed in Solidworks 2013. There are STL and IGS files available. That render was composed in Keyshot.

... There are the technical drawings as well! So if you find an old school machinist whose better than using 1s and 0s, you're still covered.


http://salvagedcircuitry.com/u43-mount


Oh help me GODs of the internationally standardized METRICAL system, it is in ... INCHES!!! Twisted Evil


Americans often seem to be on a different planet. Smile Their 'world series' is America only & they tend not to like international! The ASTM frequently updates ISO standardized methods unilaterally...

IIRC there have been several multi million (billion?) dollar errors made in space science by mixing metric & imperial units. I think the scientist have switched to metric but the engineers often haven't.

Inches explains why 4 decimals are needed!! It's very rare to need more than 2 decimals when working in mm Smile
It does have quite a few measurements I've not made on my mounts (such as screw holes) & the angles are going to be useful.

Despite the archaic units I'm sure this file will be useful. TFS @fuzzywuzzy !


Even in Canada a lot of industrial stuff is still in Imperial (or as my dad says, "Standard") measurements.

When dad was doing an alignment etc. the tolerance was always measured in "thou".


PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 3:52 pm    Post subject: Re: Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD Reply with quote

fuzzywuzzy wrote:

Even in Canada a lot of industrial stuff is still in Imperial (or as my dad says, "Standard") measurements.

When dad was doing an alignment etc. the tolerance was always measured in "thou".


Being British & born ~10years before decimalization came in I'm reasonably familiar with both systems. I have to admit there are a few places where I think imperial - MPG makes sense to me while liters/100km (or worse still as my wife's car uses liters/100miles) need a lot of consideration before they mean anything.
In DIY projects I sometimes end up with weird combinations cutting wood to a width in metric but a length in imperial (If the imperial gives a convenient whole number in stead of a long string of numbers)

When measuring something clearly made in metric using imperial does seem bizarre. The hole for the locating pin is listed as 0.0785" when it's simply a nominal 2mm (0.07874") Knowing how awkward it is to accurately measure small holes I suspect it's actually closer to 2mm than even precision calipers can measure as an internal diameter.


PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was a maintenance engineer, my 'speciality' was welding and fabrication, and a manager - someone with a degree in engineering - gave me a plan ( scribble on a scrap of paper ) for a pipe support bracket that was "1 meter 4.5 inches" high. Rolling Eyes

Excellent link, even though it's of no direct use to me. it seems all good from an engineers point of view. Like 1 small


PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2017 1:48 pm    Post subject: Re: Micro Four Thirds Mount Technical Drawing and CAD Reply with quote

DConvert wrote:
fuzzywuzzy wrote:

Even in Canada a lot of industrial stuff is still in Imperial (or as my dad says, "Standard") measurements.

When dad was doing an alignment etc. the tolerance was always measured in "thou".


Being British & born ~10years before decimalization came in I'm reasonably familiar with both systems. I have to admit there are a few places where I think imperial - MPG makes sense to me while liters/100km (or worse still as my wife's car uses liters/100miles) need a lot of consideration before they mean anything.
In DIY projects I sometimes end up with weird combinations cutting wood to a width in metric but a length in imperial (If the imperial gives a convenient whole number in stead of a long string of numbers)

When measuring something clearly made in metric using imperial does seem bizarre. The hole for the locating pin is listed as 0.0785" when it's simply a nominal 2mm (0.07874") Knowing how awkward it is to accurately measure small holes I suspect it's actually closer to 2mm than even precision calipers can measure as an internal diameter.


Hmm, I always wondered why so many famous lenses were made in Germany and Japan, then I thought about the internal precision standard, it was 1 micron at Zeiss Jena (0.001mm) and when I worked at the mechanic workshop, it was already 0.1mm for course work - now seen under this aspect inch vs mm (and people using that for their thinking about things), things get clearer Wink