Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder?
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can't go wrong with a Nikon FTn or F2. The only downside to the FTn is very few still have operable meters.


PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NikonAIS wrote:
You can't go wrong with a Nikon FTn or F2. The only downside to the FTn is very few still have operable meters.


I had one, without the meter of course. Smile


PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 7:30 am    Post subject: robustness Reply with quote

the original question was whether there was an SLR or a rangefinder that one could toss into a car without worry

I maintain that robustness should refer to ability to take pictures regardless of age and that battery dependent ancillary functions may be disregarded.

-Yes, the Nikonos brick is not an RF and its fiddly spring-loaded battery chamber lid might hasten its demise, but the Leicas remain strong contenders-.

Apart from being more coddled, and sometimes resting on a shelf, a halfways fair measure of longevity would be to have a count of the number of working Nikons and Leicas observed in the wild divided by the original numbers sold. Assuming that owners were equally likely to still be using film.

p.


PostPosted: Sun Jul 19, 2020 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If we're gonna include rangefinders:

For years, I've kept a rangefinder around for just this purpose -- being tossed around and taking it: The Canon QL-17 GIII. Its meter may not always be operable, but its shutter has never quit on me. Sometimes called the "poor man's Leica" it always manages to take good pics.


PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2020 4:59 pm    Post subject: Re: What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder? Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
Currently I have a Nikon F-301, Olympus OM-10 and Canon T-50. All of them sort of electronic and/or fragile.

But I really want a camera that I can toss to a car seat and not worry if it bounces on the floor.


In the mean time ... did you make your choice? Or do you still need advice ... Rolling Eyes ?


PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:01 am    Post subject: Re: What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder? Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
In the mean time ... did you make your choice? Or do you still need advice ... Rolling Eyes ?




Actually not, thanks for asking. I found out that a Minolta XG-1 is surprisingly robust combined with a half-case. Tried a Zenit ET for few weeks but it is just too rustic. Smile

This thread has its own life and is valuable in itself.


PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:35 pm    Post subject: Re: What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder? Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:
stevemark wrote:
In the mean time ... did you make your choice? Or do you still need advice ... Rolling Eyes ?




Actually not, thanks for asking. I found out that a Minolta XG-1 is surprisingly robust combined with a half-case. Tried a Zenit ET for few weeks but it is just too rustic. Smile


Ah OK Wink ... If yours should fail I have a few spares here ...

kansalliskala wrote:
This thread has its own life and is valuable in itself.


Sure!

Greetings to Suomi Wink (actually the small tree shown in my websites "artaphot" logo was shot in the Pallastunturi area, many moons ago ...)


PostPosted: Sun Jul 26, 2020 5:38 am    Post subject: Re: What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder? Reply with quote

stevemark wrote:
Greetings to Suomi Wink (actually the small tree shown in my websites "artaphot" logo was shot in the Pallastunturi area, many moons ago ...)


I didn't know anyone come see "mountains" of Finland from Switzerland.
Or maybe you see them as nice hills. Very Happy


PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2020 3:50 pm    Post subject: Re: What is a really robust film SLR or Rangefinder? Reply with quote

kansalliskala wrote:

Or maybe you see them as nice hills. Very Happy


That's quite accurate Wink

However, it's much calmer up there in the north, compared to our mountains ...


PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2020 6:41 am    Post subject: calmer is not just highwinds Reply with quote

how about mosquitos and gnats. On a long walk from the finnish border out to the Norwegian fjords wdedecided to walk at night, since the biting inhabitants were less active then.

p.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2020 8:00 am    Post subject: on topic Reply with quote

so in addition to this geographical digression I should add at that time my robust machine was a leica IIIc with its collapsible summicron, which fit snugly into my anorak breast pocket unperturbed by the gnats that managed to sneak through the wrinkkles of its elastic wrist covers- The camera would not have taken kindly to being submerged, but did stand up to being knocked about.

p.


PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2020 6:18 pm    Post subject: Re: on topic Reply with quote

paulhofseth wrote:
how about mosquitos and gnats. On a long walk from the finnish border out to the Norwegian fjords wdedecided to walk at night, since the biting inhabitants were less active then.

p.


Uhhm ... my then girlfriend (she had been working in Finland for about one year) was wise enough to suggest a first visit in Feb/March, which was great. A second time we went there in October, no problems with gnats and midges as well ...

paulhofseth wrote:
so in addition to this geographical digression I should add at that time my robust machine was a leica IIIc with its collapsible summicron, which fit snugly into my anorak breast pocket unperturbed by the gnats that managed to sneak through the wrinkkles of its elastic wrist covers- The camera would not have taken kindly to being submerged, but did stand up to being knocked about.

p.


I was using one my trusty Minolta 9000 cameras back then, with only a MinAF 2.8/20, the 1.4/50 and the 2.8/200 APO G. There was never a problem with the camera/lenses, even at around -25° when I was shooting the small tree now seen in the artaphot logo ...

S


PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2020 7:40 pm    Post subject: robustness as climate toleration Reply with quote

gnats would not affect cameras, but in my experience, even mild, minus 10C ,conditions necessitated wrapping the camera well when entering a warm room or the lens would fog up internally and be unusable for quite a long time. Happened once to one of my takumars, Nice snaps of skiing and snow crystals however.

So for ultimate weather resistance I still recommend the Nikonos. to me it is not just about the satisfaction of owning the most robust device of its species sitting on a shelf, but it entails that in particularly inclement weather I take an Ilford XP out of the fridge and go out to take pictures.

p


PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2020 1:47 pm    Post subject: Re: robustness as climate toleration Reply with quote

paulhofseth wrote:
gnats would not affect cameras, but in my experience, even mild, minus 10C ,conditions necessitated wrapping the camera well when entering a warm room or the lens would fog up internally and be unusable for quite a long time.


Yes, that's a common problem ... but even a Nikonos would be unusable in said conditions: The outside of the lens (and the viewfinder) would just mist over ...

That said, the Minolta 9000 was remarkably unshaken by low temperature. Of course Ni-Cd accus were a must both in Finland as well as (during winter times) in Swiss mountains.


PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:41 pm    Post subject: cold conditions Reply with quote

Yes, condensation on the outside but not inside and that clears up with heat-

Nicads were not particularly effective in the cold, For my Beaulieu S.8 I soldered together some accumulators to keep in my reasonably warm pocket with a long lead to the camera, but to keep the quite large schneider vario something from condensation afterwards was another matter

p.


PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:46 pm    Post subject: Re: cold conditions Reply with quote

paulhofseth wrote:

Nicads were not particularly effective in the cold
p.


Sure ... but better than ordinary batteries Wink

Remember that the 9000 did not have a built-in winder or motor for film advance; thus its energy consumption was quite limited, especially if AF was turned off! I remember that using AF at temperatures <-5°C was cumbersome, but taking images was never a problem.

S


PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:47 pm    Post subject: Re: cold conditions Reply with quote

paulhofseth wrote:

Nicads were not particularly effective in the cold
p.


Sure ... but better than ordinary batteries Wink

Remember that the 9000 did not have a built-in winder or motor for film advance; thus its energy consumption was quite limited, especially if AF was turned off! I remember that using AF at temperatures <-5°C was cumbersome, but taking images was never a problem.

S