Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Tamron SP f5.6 / 350mm (06B) mirror lens
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 6:08 am    Post subject: Tamron SP f5.6 / 350mm (06B) mirror lens Reply with quote

Well, since yesterday I own this lens, too (in addition to its sister, the SP f8/500mm) as I remembered how excellently our members Calvin lens performed Wink

Here some first shots with it of yesterday evening...
#1


#2


#3


#4


#5


And of course I checked for lens separation, and there is none (thanks Calvin for the tip) Wink

I'm pretty impressed I have to say!


PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congrats

The best ~300mm mirror lens I have ever tried. Easy to focus without a tripod and takes sharp photos.


PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was only earlier today that I noticed mine partly hidden behind the PC. It was probably a decade ago when I finally found one I could afford. I also have both versions of the 500mm.

Although I have been known to pack it in my camera bag and take it out with me, it has always stayed in the bag and now it tends to be left at home.

The images here tell me I should start using it when we get some better weather.


PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2019 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice! Always lusted after a copy of this lens. Seems to be one that truly is what everyone says. I really like the IQ demonstrated in your images. Definitely living up to the hype it would appear!


PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 2:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

These look very nice Klaus! I've put the lens in my memory--if the right deal comes along--will grab one. Tx jt


PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 7:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks guys!


PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2019 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like 1 Like 1 Like 1
Tom


PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 11:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I took some test shots this morning. I was going to compare it on the EM-1 and the A7R. I couldn't find the right adapter for the EM-1, having set the ISO. I then went ahead with the A7R, thinking I had set the ISO on 100 but it was on 400, so, some extreme shutter speeds! Smile The brick building is the subject for my lens tests.

It was around freezing and the A7R is renowned for shutter shake but maybe that and my shivering were dealt with by the exposure. All hand held but leaning on wheelie bin for support.

The images are uncropped, apart from the second one, which is a crop from the first, processed from scratch. The last was rotated 3 degrees to correct verticals, losing a small amount. I relied quite a lot on the A7R's focus peaking for accurate focusing.

The shutter speed was 1/2000 for all but the last, which was 1/3200.

I have to say that I was surprised at how good the lens is. It rivals my 180mm Anniversery Edition.

I have more to come, macros at the closest focus.







PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

excellent results you got!!


PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A few macro shots of a Flower Bouquet...different focus points


#1


#2


#3


PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is my cat, from the same session. It is the only subject I shot in this size range.

On the left you can see how nearby foliage is rendered.

A7R 1/320 at ISO 400, hand-held.



PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here are the promised macros. I find f5.6 pretty useless for most subjects. I would need at leas a x1.4 TC, probably a x2 behind the lens for material I would find interesting. These have not been cropped, except to make some +/- square.

Shutter speed from 1/250 to 1/800. I had to considerably reduce highlights on the Darlingtonia

All at closest working distance, magnifcation 1:2.5.


Darlingtonia




Clematis winter leaves



Rain drops on leaf




As above, defocused to show "doughnuts"



Dead flower: persists in winter



Last edited by e6filmuser on Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:50 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 2:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
A few macro shots of a Flower Bouquet...different focus points

[/url]


So sweet that they look edible!!! Best jt


PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

e6filmuser wrote:
Here are the promised macros. I find f5.6 pretty useless for most subjects. I would need at leas a x1.4 TC, probably a x2 behind the lens for material I would find interesting. These have not been cropped, except to make some +/- square.

Shutter speed from 1/250 to 1/800. I had to considerably reduce highlights on the Darlingtonia

All at closest working distance, magnifcation 1:3.


Darlingtonia



Clematis winter leaves



Rain drops on leaf



As above, defocused to show "doughnuts"


Dead flower: persists in winter



Hey e6filmuser, you did some fine work to highlight just how strong this lens is--thank you! Best jt


PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am by no means a bird photographer but a pair of Robins in my garden are unusually approachable. Yesterday I went to where I usually find them, having waited until the sun was on the shrubbery. I set WB to sun.

I did even better than expected. A small problem was that the birds hopped from sunshine into shade. I went for the majority shade in opening the files.

I was surprised how many were OOF, having looked good when I pressed the button. The DOF is difficult to use without much practice. I conclude that head-on shots will get only head and shoulders, at most, sharp. Lateral views are better for that.

Same hardware as before and the images are uncropped. 1/125 to 1/800 sec.

Anyway, here are some of the better ones. The OOF effect on some twigs is interesting.



















Last edited by e6filmuser on Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:09 am; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice pics of the little bird!
Like 1 Like 1


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is not about the best lens for bird photography or about well-composed images. It is strictly to get some images with the lens on a x2 crop sensor. (I recently tested it on my full frame A7R). It is only the second time I have used this lens and the first time on the EM-1.

http://adaptall-2.com/lenses/06B.html

It was an overcast morning. On m4/3 the lens is effectively a fixed aperture of f11. So exposures were 1/250 and 1/160 at ISO 1600. The distances were ca 25feet and ca 10 feet, respectively. The effective focal length on m4/3 is 700mm, not ideal for hand-held. The camera was hand held (with support from a wall) and the images have been checked for motion blur. There was none.

If you know how chickens move when they are feeding then you know how pheasants move. As they walk around their heads move forwards and backwards. When they are feeding, they raise their heads for about a second before resuming the head-down position. None of this is helpful. Keeping the head in focus as the birds walked around required a lot of adjustment and usually considerable rotation of the focus ring. The distance shot was after feeding and the close shot (possibly slightly soft?) was when the male spotted a female, lost interest in food and displayed.

The images are uncropped and cropped versions, the latter just to give more-pleasing compositions..

The bokeh against the grass is not to my liking but I like it against the shadowed trees.

I purchased the lens (10-15 years ago) for opportunistic shots of birds, and suchlike, and because of its small size. It seems quite suitable.






For comparison, an image (shot last year) with the same camera but with the Leica Lumix 100-400mm at 400mm and f6.3, processed identically.



PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

e6filmuser wrote:
On m4/3 the lens is effectively a fixed aperture of f11.


Very good results with the 350mm lens e6filmuser, particularly hand held. Do you think the IBIS was a factor?.

But just to be pedantic, the f number of a lens is a physical property of the optical design, it doesn't change because you are using a camera with a different sized sensor. It's still f5.6.
Where there is confusion is when people start referring to all that crop factor equivalence stuff. The 350mm mirror on your olympus is "equivalent" da da da... 700mm da da da f11 Twisted Evil . The field of view change vs full frame is real and the practical consequences of adapting those 1/focal length rules of thumb from the film era to give you a reasonable shutter speed that's real, but the negligible bokeh/background focus change indicated by the "equivalent" f11 (which is the only point of talking about it) well is there really much of a point?


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

marcusBMG wrote:
e6filmuser wrote:
On m4/3 the lens is effectively a fixed aperture of f11.


Very good results with the 350mm lens e6filmuser, particularly hand held. Do you think the IBIS was a factor?.

But just to be pedantic, the f number of a lens is a physical property of the optical design, it doesn't change because you are using a camera with a different sized sensor. It's still f5.6.
Where there is confusion is when people start referring to all that crop factor equivalence stuff. The 350mm mirror on your olympus is "equivalent" da da da... 700mm da da da f11 Twisted Evil . The field of view change vs full frame is real and the practical consequences of adapting those 1/focal length rules of thumb from the film era to give you a reasonable shutter speed that's real, but the negligible bokeh/background focus change indicated by the "equivalent" f11 (which is the only point of talking about it) well is there really much of a point?


I never said it changed: "the lens is effectively a fixed aperture of f11". The aperture of the lens does not change but only the centre of the lens contributes to the image. Blowing up the images to the same size as one from a full frame sensor spreads the light out further, effectively, a smaller aperture from the point of view of exposure. The DOF is also greater, much as when using a TC. I use that to my advantage every day. If you think otherwise, you are mistaken.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fear you have fallen under the malign influence of the obsessed Tony Northrupp. His u-tube vidoes are fueling endless confusion and arguement about this.
The exposure of the image depends on the light intensity. This doesn't change because of a smaller/larger sensor. A small sensor will detect the light of the image as just as bright/intense as a large sensor.
If you don't believe this, check the exposure for yourself between full frame/apsc/m43/small sensor p&s etc if you can (of eg a white wall or st) Each camera will have the same exposure reading.
I got confused myself about this (yeah thanks a lot Tony ...idiot), and started a big argy bargy in a thread on PF, then did some informed reading.
Exposure is determined by f-stop and that doesn't change, as we have already agreed.


Last edited by marcusBMG on Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:59 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

marcusBMG wrote:
I fear you have fallen under the malign influence of the obsessed Tony Northrupp. His u-tube vidoes are fueling endless confusion and arguement about this.
The exposure of the image depends on the light intensity. This doesn't change because of a smaller/larger sensor. A small sensor will detect the light of the image as just as bright/intense as a large sensor.
If you don't believe this, check the exposure for yourself between full frame/apsc/m43/small sensor p&s etc if you can (of eg a white wall or st) Each camera will have the same exposure reading.


Never heard of him. You haven't even read my comments properly.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

e6filmuser wrote:
This is not about the best lens for bird photography or about well-composed images. It is strictly to get some images with the lens on a x2 crop sensor. (I recently tested it on my full frame A7R). It is only the second time I have used this lens and the first time on the EM-1.

http://adaptall-2.com/lenses/06B.html

It was an overcast morning. On m4/3 the lens is effectively a fixed aperture of f11. So exposures were 1/250 and 1/160 at ISO 1600. The distances were ca 25feet and ca 10 feet, respectively. The effective focal length on m4/3 is 700mm, not ideal for hand-held. The camera was hand held (with support from a wall) and the images have been checked for motion blur. There was none.

If you know how chickens move when they are feeding then you know how pheasants move. As they walk around their heads move forwards and backwards. When they are feeding, they raise their heads for about a second before resuming the head-down position. None of this is helpful. Keeping the head in focus as the birds walked around required a lot of adjustment and usually considerable rotation of the focus ring. The distance shot was after feeding and the close shot (possibly slightly soft?) was when the male spotted a female, lost interest in food and displayed.

The images are uncropped and cropped versions, the latter just to give more-pleasing compositions..

The bokeh against the grass is not to my liking but I like it against the shadowed trees.

I purchased the lens (10-15 years ago) for opportunistic shots of birds, and suchlike, and because of its small size. It seems quite suitable.



For comparison, an image (shot last year) with the same camera but with the Leica Lumix 100-400mm at 400mm and f6.3, processed identically.


Very nicely done--very much appreciate your contributions to this thread. Best, JT


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

repeat

If you don't believe this, check the exposure for yourself between full frame/apsc/m43/small sensor p&s etc if you can (of eg a white wall or st) Each camera will have the same exposure reading.
And I'll leave it at that.

Like 1 small for the pics again very nice.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 06, 2019 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

marcusBMG wrote:
repeat

If you don't believe this, check the exposure for yourself between full frame/apsc/m43/small sensor p&s etc if you can (of eg a white wall or st) Each camera will have the same exposure reading.
And I'll leave it at that.

Like 1 small for the pics again very nice.


I have no intention of testing the basics for macro in which I have been deeply involved for over three decades.


PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

marcusBMG wrote:
repeat

If you don't believe this, check the exposure for yourself between full frame/apsc/m43/small sensor p&s etc if you can (of eg a white wall or st) Each camera will have the same exposure reading.
And I'll leave it at that.

Like 1 small for the pics again very nice.


OK, let's start again.

This got messy because I was challenged on an assertion that I had not made i.e. about exposure.

What I had in mind was angle of view and DOF, the latter very important in macro.

Yes, the exposure would be the same. I was not concerned with that.

I am probably in error for saying "effective aperture". This was, in my mind, in terms of DOF.

I got diverted into macro matters where effective apertures dominate.