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A sensor-shifting camera for autofocusing MF lenses
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 2:45 pm    Post subject: A sensor-shifting camera for autofocusing MF lenses Reply with quote

Great news from Sony. Even though this rumor started from last year, they made it more believable with a new patent. I know that this technique was used on the Contax AX but with the advantage of new technology and especially mirrorless camera, it can be upgraded to a new level. This could be a slap to DSLR market and Sony's competitors. Probably it will be for the new A7000.



http://www.mirrorlessrumors.com/sony-patent-adds-focusing-on-all-manual-lenses-olympus-working-on-qx-style-camera

All of us here don't mind manual focus, but sometimes AF really helps, and I can think of it as a solution to the differences in the flange focal distance among cameras. Also, for macro guys, stacking can be done very easily!


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

this would be fabulous!
this would not only boost the usefulness of our manual lenses, but thinking how much many of the better AF lenses cost, most likely also their value Wink


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kuuan wrote:
this would be fabulous!
this would not only boost the usefulness of our manual lenses, but thinking how much many of the better AF lenses cost, most likely also their value Wink


Third party companies like Samyang and Zhongyi must celebrate this news, no more complaints on the lack of the AF. I wonder when the prices for vintage lenses will climb up. It's really another game changer from Sony.

Maybe it also can help Sony sensor to do a better job on image stabilization because it can move with one more level of freedom. Fascinating!


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AF will be nice for certain occasion. Moreover, I am more interested in the per-pixel-shutter sensor.
http://www.sonyalpharumors.com/sony-patent-discloses-groundbreaking-per-pixel-exposure-sensor/


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right, Zhong Yi is doing great, these good, fast but affordable Mitakons are very attractive. Sony certainly is the biggest innovative camera maker, and has even made many of those who only shook their heads at NEXes in the beginning into converts Wink
.......
In a way I have been hoping that Pentax ( Ricoh ) might come forward with something similar, after all they have long experience with sensor shift stabilization and lately also, being the only one, with a shifting sensor simulating AA filter. Certainly I am fine with Sony though, just hope they also would give us a model with a tilting EVF, still missing a FF mirrorless that has this. It's so very helpful not only for 'difficult' angles but also to hold the camera more stable. Just today did shots with my Ricoh GXR M sharp at 1/13 and 1/15 sec. handhold without stabilization.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

calvin83 wrote:
AF will be nice for certain occasion. Moreover, I am more interested in the per-pixel-shutter sensor.
http://www.sonyalpharumors.com/sony-patent-discloses-groundbreaking-per-pixel-exposure-sensor/


I found it too, but it's less believable than the shifting sensor. First, light meter should work on every pixel, accurately and rapidly, and it will take more time for getting feedback from the sensor. Second, there is no details on how they can control the different exposure using only one shutter. I imagine that it's easily to get a messed up HDR under the complicated light condition. But anyway, it's still a cool idea and I don't mind to welcome it once it becomes true Laughing

kuuan wrote:
Right, Zhong Yi is doing great, these good, fast but affordable Mitakons are very attractive. Sony certainly is the biggest innovative camera maker, and has even made many of those who only shook their heads at NEXes in the beginning into converts Wink
.......
In a way I have been hoping that Pentax ( Ricoh ) might come forward with something similar, after all they have long experience with sensor shift stabilization and lately also, being the only one, with a shifting sensor simulating AA filter. Certainly I am fine with Sony though, just hope they also would give us a model with a tilting EVF, still missing a FF mirrorless that has this. It's so very helpful not only for 'difficult' angles but also to hold the camera more stable. Just today did shots with my Ricoh GXR M sharp at 1/13 and 1/15 sec. handhold without stabilization.


Other companies will have to pay up later if they're not innovative, and currently following Sony is still not a bad idea. Recently Olympus also copied the smart lens of Sony, so we can expect similar moves from Canon, Nikon, Pentax, etc.

And the 1/13 sec is very impressive Surprised , I can do to up to just 1/20 sec with 50mm lenses Sad


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the per pixel shutter is fascinating. But me too I think that for that we most likely we have to wait a bit longer still.

Langstrum wrote:

Other companies will have to pay up later if they're not innovative, and currently following Sony is still not a bad idea. Recently Olympus also copied the smart lens of Sony, so we can expect similar moves from Canon, Nikon, Pentax, etc.


hopefully!

Langstrum wrote:
And the 1/13 sec is very impressive Surprised , I can do to up to just 1/20 sec with 50mm lenses Sad

1/20 with a 50mm is truly impressive! Mine today were taken with the 15mm Heliar Wink with the 15mm I should be able to do more slow too, but never have tested, down to 1/10 however is common, never any blurred one


PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moving sensor will only works well with manual lens with unit focusing. It will not works with internal focusing lens and it might not works well with zooms or any lens with floating element(s).


PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 1:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

calvin83 wrote:
Moving sensor will only works well with manual lens with unit focusing. It will not works with internal focusing lens and it might not works well with zooms or any lens with floating element(s).


I'm sure it won't be good for lenses with floating element(s) but I don't know about the IF lenses, so they also require a fix distance from sensor to the rear element?


PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 1:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Langstrum wrote:
calvin83 wrote:
Moving sensor will only works well with manual lens with unit focusing. It will not works with internal focusing lens and it might not works well with zooms or any lens with floating element(s).


I'm sure it won't be good for lenses with floating element(s) but I don't know about the IF lenses, so they also require a fix distance from sensor to the rear element?

You can do a experiment yourself by placing your 85mm T1.5(an IF lens) into an bellow/helicoid to your NEX.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

calvin83 wrote:
Moving sensor will only works well with manual lens with unit focusing. It will not works with internal focusing lens and it might not works well with zooms or any lens with floating element(s).

That's right, but it could still be very useful. It will not work with tele-lenses on close focus, too - the shifting distance can't be that long.
But I think it is intended to work as an addition to the manual focus. You first pre-focus manually a little further than the intended focus point and the sensor shift automatically makes the precise adjustment. Used this way it could work quite well with internal focusing lenses and tele-lenses, too.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 2:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dan_ wrote:
calvin83 wrote:
Moving sensor will only works well with manual lens with unit focusing. It will not works with internal focusing lens and it might not works well with zooms or any lens with floating element(s).

That's right, but it could still be very useful. It will not work with tele-lenses on close focus, too - the shifting distance can't be that long.
But I think it is intended to work as an addition to the manual focus. You first pre-focus manually a little further than the intended focus point and the sensor shift automatically makes the precise adjustment. Used this way it could work quite well with internal focusing lenses and tele-lenses, too.

Good idea! Some lens is hard to nail the focus and sensor shift can help to achieve precise adjustment.