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Kuribayashi Petri C.C. Orikkor 2/50
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

edri wrote:
Thanks. Recently?
if you check ebay often you'll see that one pops up every month or 2.. usually attached to a camera.

Look for one with the 52mm filter thread that either says "Kuribayashi" or "Orrikor" or both

The M42 threaded one is more ideal of course.. the Petri Bayonet one will be harder to adapt and require some DIY but not impossible

--mike


PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the info.


PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote



PostPosted: Sun Aug 20, 2017 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

D. P. wrote:


Superb image.
Five stars from me.
Congratulations DP
Tom


PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like 1 small Like 1 small Like 1 small

I, too, have that lens, shoulg dig it out I guess..


PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2019 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some first shots of the lens with my A7II & KECAY M42/E-Mount Helicoid


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really very good pics.

IT's very rare thing that in your best 10 lenses thread, nobody puts this lens among those best ones.

For my eyes is by far more sharp than the helios 44 and with the same pleasent bokeh.

I don't know if the orikkor ones are the same 7 elements than the last bayonet Petri version without orikkor word ar the front ring.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 2:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice to see this thread still going. I haven't used mine in a while, but since I first posted, the M42 blog has done an interesting review of this lens: https://spiral-m42.blogspot.com/2017/05/petri-camera-co-high-speed-petri-part-3.html

I think I'm going to give mine some use next time I load up one of my M42 cameras.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is this lens radioactive? the ad presented in this thread says it contains "rare earth"


PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice images, it reminds me a bit a MOG Domiron. Here is another nice link:

http://pakira3.sakura.ne.jp/wp/?p=77220


PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Rare earth" describes a number of minerals, not all of which are radioactive. I don't know what glass Petri used though, but it could be any number minerals.

As for the link above, thanks! I think most of the Petri lenses give a rather Meyer-esque look, but this one in particular is a little more unique than most of them, I don't really know of another lens quite like it.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 6:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My question concerning radioactivity was for those who have this lens and are able to measure it.


PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2019 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry for attempting to answer.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mos6502 sorry, nothing personal, but this lens was produced for a short period of time and was more complicated than next model, it gives an assumption that it might be rad one, if you have one it would be nice to have a check.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Macheck, I do have this lens (I started this thread after all) but no way to measure if it is radioactive. I suspect that the reason for its complexity just has to do with the state of lens technology at the time. It is easy to forget that creating a fast 50 that would clear an SLR mirror was still a big deal in the 1950s, and very few actual 50mm lenses existed in speeds higher than f/2.8, most companies settling on a slightly longer focal length of 55 or 58mm. This lens was most likely designed in-house by Petri, and the "excess" complexity of the design is probably just the result of inexperience in producing this sort of lens, as Petri had never made an SLR, nor a lens for one, before. It should be noted that Nikon's original 2/50 for the F was also a seven element design, before it was revised, becoming a conventional six elements in four groups design. So even the big names had some trouble with this.


However, as seen above, Nikon's approach was a little less original than Petri's.

Wolfhansen, thank you for the photos! Nice examples of exaggerated OOF rendering of the Orikkor - it makes me think of how painters, imitating photographs, would render a background.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Summicron M 2/50 till 1969 had not any problem with the seven elements lenses.

The Nikon 2/50 remind me a bit of the Ultron/planar (Icarex/Rollei mounts)


PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2019 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another aspect of the lens worth mentioning is that it is clearly not an f2 lens in terms of light gathering and displays the same shutter speeds as some f1.4 lenses! I need to test it against some of my others more "scientifically" but it`s very notable in general use.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The second generation of Petri lenses, the first to use the Petri mount, seems to have a 50/2 with the same layout, at least for the early models. (Those in the facebook group: Photography with Classic Lenses will already have seen posts regarding it, it has also been the subject of conjecture on Japanese Petri fan websites.)


In this photo I tried to get some reflections to show the similarity. The 3 bright and one small pinpoint light on the right hand side of the lens is the rear group, and the three pinpoint lights on the left are the forward group.


Lenses swapped sides when I wasn't looking....


The left hand element is from the Petri Auto, the right hand one is from the M42 Orikkor lens


Another attempt at photographing the reflections, not entirely successfully. The three bright point lights on the upper right of each lens are from the triple cemented element. There is then a less bright point light, on the right lens (Orikkor) it is to the left of the three larger reflections from my desk lamp. On the left lens the dimmer point light is discernable in the midst of the reflections from the desk lamp.

Oddly enough the Petri manual for the Penta V2 camera this lens came with (https://www.butkus.org/chinon/petri/petri_penta_v2/petri_penta_v2.htm) shows the lens as a more conventional 6/4 type. Perhaps they were, once they used all the elements they had made for the original Penta. But it makes for an interesting find, and a possibly even rarer lens. I have not been specifically looking for it, but in several years of ebay trawling have only come across two, and know of one other belonging to a member of the facebook group mentioned.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are the rear groups interchangeable across lenses?

From a M42 Copy


Light Soak


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most likely yes, although admittedly I did not try, as I was concerned greatly with not getting them mixed up.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Alun Thomas wrote:
Most likely yes, although admittedly I did not try, as I was concerned greatly with not getting them mixed up.


Pencil marking on the outside of the, what the old lens makers have always done (Pertvals etc.) Wink


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting that you uncovered something like this!

I would be curious to compare the rear group barrel mount on a revised lens to the M42 copy.

Do the serial numbers provide any clue as to the production?


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went back and unscrewed the rear groups. They are not interchangeable the thread sizes are ever so slightly different. I then removed the triple cemented elements - they are the same dimensionally and can be each fitted into the carrier for the other lens.


The Orikkor group is on the left. It is slightly different and has an extra ring screwd onto the main carrier, a small graduated anti-reflective baffle, which the later lens does not have.



Orikkor on the left again. More differences here, the smooth part at the top is not flat black more of a metallic dark brown. Also has a groove around the diameter the later lens does not have.

The later auto aperture lens is five bladed, with somewhat rounded blades.

My copy of the auto lens has a serial 56527. The lens belonging to the other facebook group member was earlier, in the 52000s.

A couple of links to the Japanese fan site where the possibility of the 7/4 structure is discussed:
https://translate.google.com/translate?depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com&sl=ja&sp=nmt4&tl=en&u=https://w.atwiki.jp/petri/pages/64.html
https://translate.google.com/translate?depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com&sl=ja&sp=nmt4&tl=en&u=https://w.atwiki.jp/petri/pages/224.html


PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Indeed, it appears there had been some open speculation about the optical formula during the transition, but not much in terms of serial number identification.

So, the lens group assemblies are different. I guess that can rule out the possibility someone performed a carryover from the rear group of the M42 to the Petri Mount.

There was also some past discussion whether Petri transitioned from Kuribayashi to another company or if they produced all their normal lenses. Not sure if this find addresses that or if that still pertains to the revised optical formula.

I would say the M42 from the original Penta is still the better lens with a more versatile mount, additional aperture blades and compact form.