Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Zeiss Nettar 515-2
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 10:53 pm    Post subject: Zeiss Nettar 515-2 Reply with quote

Having my right leg in a cast and being effectively immobile for a while has given me time to finally edit a bunch of year-old photos of some cameras. First up, here is my Zeiss Ikon Nettar 515-2. The instruction manual that came with this camera is on Butkus, if you're curious.

1

The camera. It's a bit worn, but still works well. The shutter is accurate and the bellows intact, but the slide for the red window is bent and somewhat tricky to open.

2


3

105mm, 1:6.3. Smallest aperture is 1:22. This has a much smaller lens than my Balda Juwella, which is also a 1:6.3.

4

Such a dramatic angle.

5

A generally handsome camera, even with some wear.

6

Oooooh... low key.

7

A detail of the logo on the fold-out plate.

As for the image quality, the Nettar yields expectedly vintage-looking results. The uncoated lenses (this is from the late 1930s) are slightly lower contrast than later cameras (obviously.) There's not too much flare with this camera, though, which speaks volumes about the design quality.

8

This is close to as much contrast as this lens can yield.

9

This roll of Lucky film had x-ray damage, so the results are pretty sub-par.

A bit of an oddity and not entirely common, this is still a fun camera to use. Not something that I would use every day, but still pretty decent. The body is large and, on mine, very hard to open. It feels like it was dropped at some point. But it is still light-tight, which testifies to the body's build quality.


PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice camera Jussi. Hope the leg is better!

These old triplets are underestimated, they are lower contrast but plenty sharp enough stopped down.

The good flare resistance is largely due to the small entrance pupil I think.