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steadyshot issue with manual lens
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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 12:28 pm    Post subject: steadyshot issue with manual lens Reply with quote

Hi
How could I activate the stabilization (steadyshot) of my nex with manual lenses ?


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nex doesn't have steadyshot. The technology is only found in the lenses themselves.


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The answer is easy, you can't, NEX doesn't have in-body steady-shot, only optical(in lens) on lenses with that feature.
Which oddly is the opposite of the A mount line.


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

However, I can see "steadyshot" in menu list, but he is dashed.

I should resell my nex and buy a new camera ?


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kiruajon wrote:
However, I can see "steadyshot" in menu list, but he is dashed.

I should resell my nex and buy a new camera ?


I don't think you should: unless you feel the in body image stabilization is an absolute necessity for you, you shouldn't.
I have it on my a55, and don't use it that often, even if it is for sure a nice feature.
AFAIK no aps-c mirrorless cam has in body image stabilization, so, in order to get it, you must switch to a dslr or a m4/3 (but I'm not really up to date on the latest cameras features, so I might be wrong).


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kiruajon wrote:
However, I can see "steadyshot" in menu list, but he is dashed.

I should resell my nex and buy a new camera ?


I don't think you should: unless you feel the in body image stabilization is an absolute necessity for you, you shouldn't.
I have it on my a55, and don't use it that often, even if it is for sure a nice feature.
AFAIK no aps-c mirrorless cam has in body image stabilization, so, in order to get it, you must switch to a dslr or a m4/3 (but I'm not really up to date on the latest cameras features, so I might be wrong).


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Steadyshot option in the menu is only to activate in-lens stabilsation.

Obviously it depends what you are shooting, but I don't find it useful anyway unless you are shooting very slow moving or static objects / scenes.


Last edited by ManualFocus-G on Thu May 09, 2013 1:58 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 1:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ManualFocus-G wrote:
The Steadyshot option in the menu is on;y to activate in-lens stabilsation.

Obviously it depends what you are shooting, but I don't find it useful anyway unless you are shooting very slow moving or static objects / scenes.


I can get it with new lenses I will be buying but I won't be using it ever I don't think. Use a tripod, monopod, or rely on fast shutter speed. It's taking me time to learn how to do this but I am beginning to produce sharp shots that are in focus.

Another thing that I am finding is the auto focus on my Nikon D3200 is very unreliable. It's better to learn how to do things the old way. Modern technology is failing me when it comes to photography. Maybe my camera and lens needs calibration - I don't know.

With my Rokkor none of these things are an issue. Idea Laughing Cool


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aanything wrote:
kiruajon wrote:
However, I can see "steadyshot" in menu list, but he is dashed.

I should resell my nex and buy a new camera ?


I don't think you should: unless you feel the in body image stabilization is an absolute necessity for you, you shouldn't.
I have it on my a55, and don't use it that often, even if it is for sure a nice feature.
AFAIK no aps-c mirrorless cam has in body image stabilization, so, in order to get it, you must switch to a dslr or a m4/3 (but I'm not really up to date on the latest cameras features, so I might be wrong).


The Pentax K-01 mirrorless has in body stabilizer, with APS-C sensor.

With micro 4/3, only the Olympus cameras have in body stabilizer.... Panasonic has in lens stabilizer.


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

dnas wrote:

The Pentax K-01 mirrorless has in body stabilizer, with APS-C sensor.


But isn't it a K-mount camera, i.e., not that interesting for vintage lens users since adaptability is no better than that of an SLR?


kiruajon wrote:

I should resell my nex and buy a new camera ?


Why do you (think you) need steadyshot so badly? Remember that none of the professional Canon or Nikon DSLRs have in-camera stabilization, nor do film cameras, yet people have been shooting with those for years. Sure, steadyshot is a nice bonus (I shoot with a Sony A900 myselffull frame with steadyshot) but certainly not essential, especially with newer cameras performing so well at high ISO. Anyhow, if you have the NEX because of its ability to accept adapters for almost any lens and its 1.5 crop sensor, there are not currently any choices on the market, to my knowledge, that retain both of those features (i.e., everything with stabilization has either smaller sensor or longer register).


Last edited by Arkku on Fri May 10, 2013 4:50 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Simply because I will receive my jupiter 21 soon, and I'm affraid of the result without stabilization (regarding the results of other forum members)


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kiruajon wrote:
Simply because I will receive my jupiter 21 soon, and I'm affraid of the result without stabilization (regarding the results of other forum members)


It's only a 200mm lens, you'll be fine! Just shoot at a speed above 1/300th second and you shouldn't get any camera shake Smile


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kiruajon wrote:
Simply because I will receive my jupiter 21 soon, and I'm affraid of the result without stabilization (regarding the results of other forum members)


Jupiter-21 with Sony Nex is a ridiculous combination without a tripod anyway. It's a monster of a lens Wink


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can shoot steadier with my NEX than with a DSLR, even with big heavy lenses. I think the fact that I can hold the camera and lens low down at waist level makes a big difference, and I treat it as a big lens that has a small camera at the back - I hold the lens firmly and use the other hand, usually my thumb, to gently press the shutter button. And I also carry a monopod at least whenever I am out shooting.


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When shooting hand held with Sony Nex, the absolute maximum focal length for me is 135mm. There are no advantages of having a small camera with longer focal lengths.


PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

parabellumfoto wrote:

Another thing that I am finding is the auto focus on my Nikon D3200 is very unreliable. It's better to learn how to do things the old way. Modern technology is failing me when it comes to photography. Maybe my camera and lens needs calibration - I don't know.


I don't have any problems with AF on my D3200, it is easy to change the location of the focus spot accidentally but as it lights up when you press the shutter slightly its not that difficult to move it or use it where it is. Maybe select a different AF mode.


PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 8:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Riku wrote:
When shooting hand held with Sony Nex, the absolute maximum focal length for me is 135mm. There are no advantages of having a small camera with longer focal lengths.

There is a size and weight advantage, 135 is about all I need for a long lens.


PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
parabellumfoto wrote:

Another thing that I am finding is the auto focus on my Nikon D3200 is very unreliable. It's better to learn how to do things the old way. Modern technology is failing me when it comes to photography. Maybe my camera and lens needs calibration - I don't know.


I don't have any problems with AF on my D3200, it is easy to change the location of the focus spot accidentally but as it lights up when you press the shutter slightly its not that difficult to move it or use it where it is. Maybe select a different AF mode.


I suspect it's calibration on my camera. I have learnt a little trick where I lock AF and then move back a little before taking my shot. It works and since learning this I have found on YouTube how auto focus works on Nikon. The focus plane is 1/3 in front and 2/3 behind. So my little trick has some logic to it. I'm new to photography as well, and on top of that it could also simply be a case of my getting used to the camera.

One mistake I have discovered is my not taking into consideration the narrow depth of field when taking close up photographs. It's virtually impossible to get proper focus regardless of AF.

I was thinking of selling my camera because I thought I had a lemon. I'll hang onto it. There is still a problem I suspect but otherwise it's a very good camera. I was trying to shoot jumbo's coming in to land at Sydney airport today. AF was a touch out? I also took a few shots of some Australian seagulls. Focus was dead on with the birds.


PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How many af lenses do you have with the D3200? It's possible that the calibration on the camera or lens is to blame. Obviously if all your af lenses are off, it is the body at fault. Stick the camera on a tripod and take the same shot twice, once using the viewfinder and once with liveview, this will show you how far out your focus is (liveview focusing should always be right).

As far as fast manual lenses are concerned, be aware that normal dslr viewfinders will only show accurate focus and depth of field when using lenses at f/2.8 or slower.


PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ManualFocus-G wrote:
How many af lenses do you have with the D3200? It's possible that the calibration on the camera or lens is to blame. Obviously if all your af lenses are off, it is the body at fault. Stick the camera on a tripod and take the same shot twice, once using the viewfinder and once with liveview, this will show you how far out your focus is (liveview focusing should always be right).

As far as fast manual lenses are concerned, be aware that normal dslr viewfinders will only show accurate focus and depth of field when using lenses at f/2.8 or slower.


I only have one AF lens. It's a new 35mm Nikkor prime.

I'm still learning. Most of the time I amusing my Minolta so I'm relying on liveview to get the manual focus tack sharp. I'm noticing all of my photographs are getting better with experience and practice.


PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While I think in-body stabilization is a good thing, I didn't use it much when I was shooting with my Sony A200, much preferring the less expensive adapters without data chips and manual exposure mode. When I moved to NEX-5N I did start using A-Priority auto because it worked much better and it didn't require data from lenses. However, I found it nearly impossible for me to use the LCD with arms extended and get anything clear without a terrible shake problem with heavy lenses. I just posted about this yesterday in another thread, but it merits repeating for the OP. The addition of an inexpensive hood (with diopter lens) has made an enormous difference. Not only does it shade the LCD in outdoor light, but adds a third bracing point which dramatically increases stability. I still prefer shooting at high shutter speeds, but often shoot slower when not paying enough attention to the speed auto selected. I think I use my 200mm more than any other lens and have had virtually no shake issues when shooting 1/200 or faster. I've also been able to get decent pictures at much slower speeds when I take my time to steady the camera. The hood can be purchased on ebay for only $14 or $15. Following are pictures of the hood; a 200mm shot taken at 1/200 and one taken at 1/40.







PostPosted: Sat May 11, 2013 11:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With even a low-end Pentax K100D I can snapshot with a 400mm.
No tripod, no monopod.
It can give sharp results up to two stops slower speeds than you would normally use.
Pentax IS is magic.

I have it on constantly. You do have to remember to change the focal length setting when changing lenses.
And its no good with zooms (if you zoom) as it cant detect the FL. I usually use zooms at max FL anyway.