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Which grease for lenses?
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:12 am    Post subject: Which grease for lenses? Reply with quote

Hi,
What do you use when you need to clean the old grease from lenses and re-lube it. White lithium grease or teflon grease?
Please share your experience if possible with product available in Europe.
Thanks,
Stefan


PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use NYE Helical Grease (available in Europe from Microtools). The white lithium grease I have around (Klber and some noname stuff from the bike shop) has the wrong action for helicals in that it starts heavy and gets more fluid as the motion continues.


PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

like this ?
http://www.micro-tools.de/en/Oils-Greases/Grease-Helical-10-Light-8ml.html

waw.. 34Euro's for 8ml.. for sure if should be good one Confused


PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

I use white lithium grease, as it is easily found here in France, but i'm not a professional repairman and i service only lenses for my friends (read: at no charge) ...

I found a post on a blog (sorry, don't have the link in mind right now) where the author showed how to re-lube a Zeiss lens using some molybdenum bisulfite grease, but it seems that it is hard to find and expensive ...

Will post the link here as soon as i found it ...


PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/71936/Van-Car-Accessories/Car-Lubricants/3-in-1-Oil-Pro-White-Lithium-Grease

if this one is good for marine -- it has to be good for helicoid --

NOTE: I have never tried this but _ I am going to do so Smile

tf


PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I find lithium grease too thick. Mine isn't white in colour so probably not the right stuff.


PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess it should comply to the following requirements:

- Should not 'creep' - in order not to oil the lens elements.
- The friction should be consistent in a wide temperature range (for example it should not harden too much if you use the lens on -10 C). But this is not so critical as the lenses i intend to service are are not AF.
Is the white one OK for that?

I've heard that there is a special grease for lenses used by Zeiss technicians .. and I guess that most probably it will be very expensive.
Have someone heard what it will be like?

Thanks,
Stefan


PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 8:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

std wrote:
I guess it should comply to the following requirements:

- Should not 'creep' - in order not to oil the lens elements.
- The friction should be consistent in a wide temperature range (for example it should not harden too much if you use the lens on -10 C). But this is not so critical as the lenses i intend to service are are not AF.
Is the white one OK for that?

I've heard that there is a special grease for lenses used by Zeiss technicians .. and I guess that most probably it will be very expensive.
Have someone heard what it will be like?

Thanks,
Stefan



I had a teaspoon with extremely expensive ( few hundreds euro for small bucket) grease from lens grinding machine, but i didn`t see any difference, so i made my own grease from Stihl chainsaw grease and WD-40 mix.


PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

shauttra wrote:
std wrote:
I guess it should comply to the following requirements:

- Should not 'creep' - in order not to oil the lens elements.
- The friction should be consistent in a wide temperature range (for example it should not harden too much if you use the lens on -10 C). But this is not so critical as the lenses i intend to service are are not AF.
Is the white one OK for that?

I've heard that there is a special grease for lenses used by Zeiss technicians .. and I guess that most probably it will be very expensive.
Have someone heard what it will be like?

Thanks,
Stefan



I had a teaspoon with extremely expensive ( few hundreds euro for small bucket) grease from lens grinding machine, but i didn`t see any difference, so i made my own grease from Stihl chainsaw grease and WD-40 mix.


shauttra -- I think your receipt is more than OK Wink

tf


PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

be careful with chainsaw grease. Most of them today are biodegradable, which means in best case they gum up very soon. Shure WD 40 makes the counter reaction to solve the gummed oil. But in worst case these oils destroy paint layers, many types of rubber and plastic and even may be aggressive to aluminium and zinc. So if you use it assure it is non biodegradable oil.


PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think he means the bar tip grease, mine is blue, looks like blue lithium, same as wheel bearing grease.

The viscosity of the grease is important for lens helical feel; viscosity to use depends on surface areas in contact, the larger the contact area, the less viscosity grease for similar 'feel', turning resistance and damping. A mix of different viscosity greases is used to achieve intermediate viscosities, and for combining unique properties of each.

Does WD40 'dry' from the grease over time, make focus stiff?

Bicycle shops have greases!


PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shin-Etsu Chemical makes some silicone greases. I think their G series may be suitable for camera lenses.

Catalog:
http://www.silicone.jp/e/catalog/pdf/grease_e.pdf


PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2011 9:19 pm    Post subject: greases Reply with quote

For Nikkor lenses you can try these lens greases on eBay. (Apologies for shameless plug, but this stuff is hard to find!)

The general problem with lens greases are that there are dozens of different kinds by many different manufacturers, all with different specs. If you had the engineering specs or know the original grease used, you might be able to figure out the best one, otherwise you have to rely on rule-of-thumb and experimentation. If you get the OEM grease for whatever lens you are working on, it will likely last longer than the corner hardware store grease, since the OEM greases are precision optical greases with synthetic bases that are more stable and long-lasting than your typical grease.

Another thing overlooked in lens regreasing, in the Nikkors for example, is that these lenses used Oil Barrier: a coating beside the greased areas that helps to prevent grease form crossing the barrier. Most times people omit this when regreasing.