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Panagor (Kiron) 24mm f/2.5
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 3:53 pm    Post subject: Panagor (Kiron) 24mm f/2.5 Reply with quote

Any of you using this one? How do you like it? I completely forgot that I had it, until I stumbled upon it yesterday. I think I'll take it out for it's maiden voyage today.



Kiron Kid


PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks cool. Should be at least decent coming from Kiron


patrickh


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

patrickh wrote:
Looks cool. Should be at least decent coming from Kiron


patrickh


Why from Kiron, MOST (not all) lenses from PANAGOR where Komine made

Anyway, the quality level from panagor was very high (certainly one of the best - perthaps the best - OVERALL quality level - I NEVER NEVER heard of an average panagor lens- all were very good to excellent)


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 2:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PBFACTS wrote:
patrickh wrote:
Looks cool. Should be at least decent coming from Kiron


patrickh


Why from Kiron, MOST (not all) lenses from PANAGOR where Komine made

Anyway, the quality level from panagor was very high (certainly one of the best - perthaps the best - OVERALL quality level - I NEVER NEVER heard of an average panagor lens- all were very good to excellent)


Panagor's are Kino Precision Industries (Kiron) lenses. They adopted the Kiron name when they decided to market their lenses internationally (United States, etc).


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 5:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Russ wrote:
Panagor's are Kino Precision Industries (Kiron) lenses. They adopted the Kiron name when they decided to market their lenses internationally (United States, etc).


NO, I repeat MOST panagor lenses are komine made
Panagor was sourcing their lenses mainly to komine but also to many other suppliers as did soligor, vivitar....

Ie : their 300+500mm miror were not komine or kiron made


The info that panagor is kino's name is a false info

Last point : panagor was selling their lenses long time before kiron sold theire lenses directly BUT panagor and kiron where ALSO selling their lenses at the same period (in competition)


Last edited by PBFACTS on Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:26 pm; edited 1 time in total


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

I have this lens since about a year, bought from a user of another forum (or this one ? Cannot remember) ...

The lens is fine, although i have never compared it against my Tak 24/3.5. Unluckily, it needs to be lubed (once fired, the diaphragm will remain closed) ... Will try to fix it before the next week holidays ...

Otherwise, as far as i can remember, the results were not bad at all ...

Cheers


PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm not an expert on who made what in Japan, but I recall clearly that the Panagor lenses being sold in the UK in the 1980s were generally quite different in shape and finish to the Kiron ones, and cheaper too. The one in Russ's picture actually looks the same as what we sold as Tokina and Hoya wide angles - "RMC" on Tokina, "HMC" on Hoya.

I have absolutely no idea what this might signify !


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kino Precision Optical Corp. was one of the more than twenty Japaneses third party lens makers in 1984. Their lenses were originally also imported under the Panagor brand, then by Vivitar.

In the early 1980s, they began direct marketing of an independent lens line in the U.S. under their new Kiron brand name. They were also producing some of the popular Vivitar lenses at the same time in their factories, reportedly including some of the Vivitar Series I optics.

In the late 1970's Kino Precision were flat out producing lenses for Vivitar, Nikon (the series E) and themselves, (Panagor in Europe, and were about to launch Kiron in the USA, then Europe). The market at the time was bouyant. Kino decided to give up the Vivitar production, it's quite noticeable that some Komine made Vivitar lenses were similar to earlier Kino made lenses and some Kiron lenses. By 1984, camera/lens sales had passed their peak, and Kino looked back to their Vivitar connections.

Panagor was the 'old' marketing name of Kino in Europe/Asia and dates back to the early 70's, and continued albeit under different ownership through to the 90's

Kiron was established late 70's to market Kino lenses, initially in the USA, then on to Europe. Panagor wasn't considered 'sexy' enough for the US based distribution company, set up by former Vivitar employees.

Kino pulled out of consumer lenses in the late 80's.

Kiron/Panagor Europe/Asia continued as a separate trading organization selling other manufacturers lenses as Kiron/Panagor into the 90's


I'll explain and clarify in more detail later.

Russ


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Russ wrote:

I'll explain and clarify in more detail later.Russ


Russ - Thanks for the info so far- be keen to learn more when you can manage to post again.


PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 3:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kino Precision Optical Corp. was one of the more than twenty Japanese third party lens makers in 1984. Their lenses were originally also imported under the Panagor brand, then by Vivitar.

In the early 1980s, they began direct marketing of an independent lens line in the U.S. under their new Kiron brand name. They were also producing some of the popular Vivitar lenses at the same time in their factories, including some of the superb Vivitar Series I optics. Kino then set up Kiron to ensure continuity in production, rather then rely on the vagaries of Vivitar contracts.

In the late 1970's Kino Precision were flat out producing lenses for Vivitar, Nikon (some of the series E lenses) and themselves, (Panagor in Europe, and were about to launch Kiron in the USA, then Europe). The market at the time was buoyant. Kino decided to give up the Vivitar production Kino, was then undercut by Komine for lens contracts.

it's quite noticeable that some Komine made Vivitar lenses were similar to earlier Kino made lenses and some Kiron lenses. Most likely both manufacturers made lenses to a Vivitar specification and generally Komine were given the contract, rather then any deliberate copying between the two. Kino, via Panagor and Kiron released designs that Vivitar didn't pick up, although ironically Vivitar later sold modified Kiron lenses.


By 1984, camera/lens sales had passed their peak, and Kino looked back to their Vivitar connections. Or it's possible that Vivitar looked back to Kino Precision Industries (Kiron).
Panagor was the 'old' marketing name of Kino in Europe/Asia and dates back to the early 70's, and continued albeit under different ownership through to the 90's

Kiron was established late 70's to market Kino lenses, initially in the USA, then on to Europe. Panagor wasn't considered 'sexy' enough for the US based distribution company, set up by former Vivitar employees.

Kino (and Komine) pulled out of consumer lenses in the late 80's. Mainly as a result of a shrinking market and the fees required by Minolta for the use of AF patents, the biggest benefit here was by Kobari whose owner 'just happened' to be on the board of Minolta at the time. Both Kino and Komine 'withdrew' from the Japanese photographic industry association at the same time as a direct result of the infighting caused by Minolta's 'excessive' patents licence fees demands)

Kiron/Panagor Europe/Asia continued as a separate trading organization selling other manufacturers lenses as Kiron/Panagor into the 90's (these were organisations independent of Kino Precision)


PostPosted: Sun Jun 28, 2020 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This Panagor is Kiron thing still seems to be haunting the internet (Mainly thanks to Kironkid). I think Komine was Panagor's main supplier too (28 2.8,135,200, macro's and 24). Here is a list of Panagor primes I found.

21mm/4 (Kiron probably)
24mm/2.5 (it looks like Komine to me)
28mm/2.0(Kino precision/Kiron)
28mm/2.5 (Kino precision/Kiron)
28mm/2.8 (Komine I think looks like the same as the Vivitar Komine 28mm 2.Cool)
35mm/2.0 (Tokina most likely)
55mm/2.8 macro (Komine)
55mm/3.0 macro
90mm/2.8 macro (Komine)
135mm/2.8 (I suspect Komine)
200mm/3.5 (Mamiya/Sekor has a similar looking one but mine has amber lettering instead of red I think Komine).
200mm/3.5 PMC (1.8m cfd instead of 2.5m Another Komine imho)
400mm/5.6 (Komine)
500mm/8 Reflex (mirror lens)

There is also a rare Panagor-E PMC 28mm 1:2.8 auto macro (close focussing to .2m and 52mm filter, no silver aperture ring) I think this may be an outlier late Panagor neither Kiron or Komine)


Last edited by D1N0 on Tue Jun 30, 2020 9:25 am; edited 4 times in total


PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’m liking my Panagor glass.


PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This Panagor is Kiron thing still seems to be haunting the internet (Mainly thanks to Kironkid). I think Komine was Panagor's main supplier too (28 2.8,135,200, macro's and 24). Here is a list of Panagor primes I found.

21mm/4 (Kiron probably)
24mm/2.5 (it looks like Komine to me)
28mm/2.0(Kino precision/Kiron)
28mm/2.5 (Kino precision/Kiron)
28mm/2.8 (Komine I think looks like the same as the Vivitar Komine 28mm 2.Cool)
35mm/2.0 (Kiron/Kino most likely)
55mm/2.8 macro (Komine)
55mm/3.0 macro (Komine - same as 2.8 but closer from actual aperture which is 3.5)
90mm/2.8 macro (Komine)
135mm/2.8 (I suspect Komine)
200mm/3.5 (Mamiya/Sekor has a similar looking one but mine has amber lettering instead of red I think Komine).
200mm/3.5 PMC (1.8m cfd instead of 2.5m Another Komine imho)
400mm/5.6 (Komine)
+
28/80 /3.5-4.5 (Cimko)
80-200mm /3.8 OT
80-200mm /4.5 OT
85-205mm /3.8 (Kino)
300mm/5.6 reflex

500mm/8 Reflex (mirror lens)
+ Panagor macro converter (specific x2.5 converter for macro work only to 1:1 .. gives fantastic results)


PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2020 2:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am finding that the Vivitar (Komine) 24 f/2 delivers nice results. As does the Vivitar (Komine) 35 f/2.8 also does quite well.


PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2020 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have changed the manufacturer of the 35mm 1:2 from Kino to Tokina because I cannot find any Kino made 35mm F2 but there is a Tokina 35 F2 With the same specs 58mm filter 8/7 that is also available as Soligor.