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Apo Lanthar test Reports
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 6:30 am    Post subject: Apo Lanthar test Reports Reply with quote

Maybe a repeat, but liked to have it in one place:

Apo Lanthar 180mm:
http://photozone.de/Reviews/46-nikon--nikkor-aps-c/264-voigtlander-sl-180mm-f4-apo-lanthar-test-reportreview

Apo Lanthar Makro 125mm:
http://www.photozone.de/canon-eos/267-voigtlander-sl-125mm-f25-apo-lanthar-test-report--review

Apo Lanthar 90mm:
http://www.photozone.de/nikon--nikkor-aps-c-lens-tests/266-voigtlander-sl-90mm-f35-apo-lanthar-nikon-review--test-report

.... well, after having finally decided, to re-complete my set to all three of them, just too outstanding to not have them all.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got 2 of the 3, the 125mm and 180mm. I just can't get excited about the 90... The 58mm and 40mm, on the other hand, are on my wishlist. The 58 escpecially.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only have the 125mm, in native EOS mount. I can say that photozone's review is very accurate. It is one of the best lenses I have ever used/owned and to me it is a huge value lens; it replaced my macro lens and every other 135mm lens that I owned, including the 135L.

The 58 is not all that interesting to me because I already own the 58/1.2 Rokkor. The 90 is interesting, but could never replace my 85 and wouldn't really add anything except weight to my bag. The 180 is not interesting because I really have little use for that focal length.

The 40 is one that I'd really like to try.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You and I share a common issue with the 90 - I've got it covered with a couple of other lenses I'd never part with. The 180mm has become my long travelling lens. It's tiny and has the color, sharpness and bokeh of the 125mm. It also focuses quite closely. If it came in a native EF mount, I'd probably use it more than my macro.

At some point, I'd like to get an m4/3 camera. I think the 40 Ultron would be a perfect lens for me with that setup. Use on my Canon's would be a bonus.


PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 7:43 pm    Post subject: they are nice Reply with quote

I have all of them and have used for last two years.
They are all great optics, good contrast, sharp and have good coating.
Very good modern lenses with MF, and good construction - full metal.
Good point of 90 and 180 is that they are small.

On the other hand: propertiary hood, metal construction is easy to scratch or dent and I think that dust has easy access to inside ;(

And finally: 90 minimum apperture is f3.5 and 180 is f4. Even if they are sharp from begining, BOKEH is not so nice. Vivitar 90 Series 1 has nicer bokeh at f5.6 than Voigtlander 90 at f3.5 - it is my personal opinion.
Similar situation is with voigtlander 180 comparing to Leitz 180/2.8.

So if someone needs small and sharp lens - vls90 and vls180 are for you.

http://www.pbase.com/piotreks/vls90

http://www.pbase.com/piotreks/vls125

http://www.pbase.com/piotreks/vls180


PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The sun hood is no issue, even if you don't have the original one, since all these lenses have
standard filter thread mount, so any right sized sunshade fits.

Excellent examples Piotr!!


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shortly, I will have an opportunity to try my 90/3.5 and 180/4 APO-Lanthars using both a Nikon D3x as well as a Nikon D3s. If there is anything in particular you are interested in I can do some pixel-peeping, just let me know in advance what areas interest you.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd appreciate the newspaper (axial-CA) test - 180mm Lanthar compared to any other 150-200mm known lens Smile


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cogitech wrote:

The 58 is not all that interesting to me because I already own the 58/1.2 Rokkor. The 90 is interesting, but could never replace my 85 and wouldn't really add anything except weight to my bag.


A Canon FD 85/1.2 SSC Aspherical and a CV 90/3.5 are really not the same sort of lens at all, except for having similar focal lengths. The typical apertures at which they are used are quite different. One is a fast lens with all the advantages and drawbacks of a fast lens, likely used at apertures less than or equal to 2.8; and one is an extremely well corrected lens mainly used between f/5.6 and f/11. I do encourage you to give the cv90 a try. Its not a fast 85 replacement; its a different lens entirely.

cogitech wrote:

The 40 is one that I'd really like to try.


Yes, its certainly a very interesting lens.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:11 pm    Post subject: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote







I assume the pink elements are ED glass or somesuch.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote

ChrisLilley wrote:
I assume the pink elements are ED glass or somesuch.


I think they are made from the famous "pink panther" jewel. Or at least polished by it ...


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

no-X wrote:
I'd appreciate the newspaper (axial-CA) test - 180mm Lanthar compared to any other 150-200mm known lens Smile


In the same focal length I only have the Nikkor 70-200/2.8G, I think it should not be penalized of being a zoom lens and one f-stop faster.

Not many lenses would survive the comparison though: the 180/4 is virtually free of axial CA, even when used wide open. There's no purple fringing either. Here's one I set up quickly with the D3 a moment ago, wide open at minimum focusing distance (quite harsh way to treat lens, yes)

crop & resize, f/4 1/125s ISO 200



File in original size http://www.flickr.com/photos/mureena/4145112330/sizes/o/


Last edited by Esox lucius on Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:58 pm; edited 5 times in total


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote

mflex-on wrote:
ChrisLilley wrote:
I assume the pink elements are ED glass or somesuch.


I think they are made from the famous "pink panther" jewel. Or at least polished by it ...


Well, perhaps someone who reads Japanese can tell us what it says.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Esox lucius: Thanks, really good result! Background bokeh is also very nice.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:08 pm    Post subject: Re: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote

ChrisLilley wrote:






I assume the pink elements are ED glass or somesuch.


YES, it is. Guess where the name "Lanthar" comes from??


PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 10:12 pm    Post subject: Re: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote

kds315* wrote:
ChrisLilley wrote:


I assume the pink elements are ED glass or somesuch.


YES, it is. Guess where the name "Lanthar" comes from??


Although I assume the SL lenses were not actually using radioactive lanthanum glass....


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:13 am    Post subject: Re: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote

ChrisLilley wrote:
Although I assume the SL lenses were not actually using radioactive lanthanum glass....

Natural Lanthanum is composed of stable Lanthanum mixed with radioactive isotopes. Stable Lanthanum by itself is not radioactive. The first glasses made with Lanthanum contained traces of radioactive isotopes and other elements as well, because it was impossible until the late 1950s to obtain 100% pure stable Lanthanum. Nowadays, Lanthanum glass is made of 99.99% pure stable Lanthanum and therefore has no radioactivity at all.

Cheers!

Abbazz


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there then a chance that the Apo-Lanthar 90 may be radioactive?
I have sold my SMC Takumar 1.4/50 for that reason. I'd hate to have to sell the Apo-Lanthar too, but if it's radioactive.... well, I don't want a radioactive lens in my bag or my closet.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Is there then a chance that the Apo-Lanthar 90 may be radioactive?
I have sold my SMC Takumar 1.4/50 for that reason. I'd hate to have to sell the Apo-Lanthar too, but if it's radioactive.... well, I don't want a radioactive lens in my bag or my closet.


Orio,

It's very radioactive and dangerous. I can save you from the hazard this lens is - just send it to me, and I'll take care of radioactivity Smile Smile Smile


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:29 am    Post subject: Re: Optical diagrams for the SL APO lenses Reply with quote

Abbazz wrote:
Nowadays, Lanthanum glass is made of 99.99% pure stable Lanthanum and therefore has no radioactivity at all.


OK, thanks!


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent information on three outstanding lenses. I was surprised to
see this number of people who already have at least one of
these lenses. Shocked I enjoy lens reviews and general opinions
related to such quality lenses.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Sebastien, couldn't have put that better!!


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even old lanthanum lenses are much less radioactive, than thoriated lenses.


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Klaus for the links..

Is there anyone who can help with suggesting stores in JAPAN where any of these lenses can be bought ?


PostPosted: Mon Nov 30, 2009 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They're low in aftermarket supply in Japan as well. Koji has kindly listed some stores you should visit when in Japan, here:

http://forum.mflenses.com/voigtlaender-sl-180mm-f-4-apo-lanthar-original-size-samples-t14183,start,15.html