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A friend's astronomy pictures
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 3:13 pm    Post subject: A friend's astronomy pictures Reply with quote

I have a friend who's in to astronomy.... He sent me some of is pictures, and said i could share them...

I was quite impressed and i thought you'd appreciate them.... I'm sure he'll appreciate your feedback.

I did my best to translate is words:

The mount (tripod) is motorized and computerized equatorial to follow the rotation of the Earth.
The telescope is a 700mm focal ZenithStar 2 and 80 mm diameter lens with dual FPL 51 (glass).
The camera is a modified Imaging Source (German), microchip with 450X680 pixel resolution
2.0 USB 2.0 connection to 30 images / second webcam.



#1 Here's the Sun photographed in 2003. The small black dot you see on the left is Venus. This is a rare event that only
occurs in a cycle of 121 and 8 years. The same event occurred again in 2012 but I could not photograph it because it was
raining. But I'm patient, i'll wait for the next time in 2117.


#2 Photo of saturn, what you see are the real colors. No tricks. The magnification is about 130x.


#3 The Moon with the shadow of the earth. A partial lunar eclipse. Common phenomenon.


#4 It's a 150X magnification of the Plato crater on the Moon. The crater is about 175 km in diameter. The smallest crater you
see in the piture is approximately 2 km. If you consider that the Moon is about 400,000 km from Earth, it's not so bad.


#5 That's Jupiter. True colors, no faking. Magnified, you can see a black dot shadow of a natural satellite.


#6 Jupiter again increasingly blurred. I wanted to see if the camera could see a natural satellite. I exaggerated the
magnification to get there. I actually had a bonus in the picture. We see not only one, but two satellites. You can see
them at 4 o'clock including one in the lower right hand corner.


#7 Here's the Sun photographed with my solar telescope. The red color is due to the filter which lets only the wavelength
of hydrogen through (the sun's fuel). When hydrogen is analyzed by a spectrograph this is the color that you see.
The smallest fire burst you see is larger than the Earth.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fantastic, these are really amazing. Thank you for sharing.


PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trully awesome, thank you!


PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 6:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing!


PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are crazy... thanks for sharing...


PostPosted: Thu Mar 27, 2014 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those are amazingly well done!


PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 12:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is sick!


PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stunning reality, terrific pictures, they just seem more natural than the perfect hubble telescope and voyager pictures.


PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 5:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those Wiliams Optics telescopes have slightly mediocre ratings, known for reddish CAs and centering errors.
Still those pics are really awesome, your friend is talented!
I wonder how ultra-awesome these pics would look if made with a Takahashi counterpart Smile


PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great ones!

@Forenseil : Takahashi is on my wish list for a very long time. Most probably it will stay there another few good years.