Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

        
Very cheap large format film - x-ray
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:17 pm    Post subject: Very cheap large format film - x-ray Reply with quote

There are quite a few people using x-ray film in regular LF cameras.

Even new X-ray film is very cheap.
You can order it from vendors of medical supplies, like these -
http://www.zzmedical.com/zencart/xray-film-c-28.html?zenid=8a5c951aa13ae190023c8304c9afb4d4

These people have 100 sheets of Kodak Green film 8x10 for $39 - thats 400 4x5 films, or $0.10 per shot. Thats as cheap as photo paper. I have seen even cheaper.

I haven't tried x-ray film yet. It looks interesting.
But there is some information on the internet.
Some is blue sensitive, some is green sensitive

Some info I gathered.

- Regular processing chemicals, processes etc. work well.
- they are sensitive on both sides so they may have less resolution (double image, where one image may be slightly defocused)
Some varieties are sensitive only on one side.
- they are very easily scratched when wet so have to be carefully handled. And because of the double surface you cant develop it in a 35mm tank by rolling them with a rubber band for instance.
- Effective ISO varies. One report is that the Green sensitive stuff seems to be about ISO 200 in daylight or ISO 25 in incandescent. There are different grades and sensitivities also, so one would have to do a lot of tests to figure out the rules for exposure.
- It tends to be rather high contrast
- Theoretially one could use a safelight to cut and load it (it is orthochromatic) but in practice it fogs easily, so assume darkroom cutting would be needed.
- It will need to be cut or trimmed for use on regular film holders as the sizes don't exactly match - 8x10 x-ray is a bit larger than 8x10 camera film.
- Its thicker than camera film so some holders may be tight.

Nice discussion here -
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?48099-X-ray-Film-example-and-comparison


PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

x-ray film? Isn't an x-ray light source needed?

How would this work if I may ask?


PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I understand that x-ray film is not only sensitive to x-rays.
It does work, there are many examples online.


PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, x-ray film is definitely sensitive to light. I fudged a newly-opened box of the 14x17 film (was shooting a
KUB for a patient that presented with possible kidney stones) by forgetting to replace the cap back on the box,
this was in Iwakuni 1990 or 1991. We went from a General Electric to a Pickering in the new clinic that didn't
'like' 100V 50 cycle Japanese electricity.

Curious to see your results, Luis.


PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No results, and I don't know if there will be any.
I was just researching the possibilities.
My personal problem with any large format film is scanning.
Won't do me much good to have nice LF negatives if they can't be scanned.
So I have to solve that first.

In any case, I just wanted to note that x-ray film is an interesting low cost option for anyone who wants to try LF.


PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sample images here
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?80011-Images-shot-on-X-ray-film


PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mmelvis wrote:
Sample images here
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?80011-Images-shot-on-X-ray-film


Thanks! That's interesting. So from that thread I take it that it's like very problematic B&W film.

That it works at all is news to me, thanks again!


PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 6:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For scanning, multiple scans with each image having some overlap followed by stitching. Lengthy process. On my Epson it takes three scans to do one 4x5.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 12:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Luis, they've got it even cheaper - $26 /100 10x8
http://www.zzmedical.com/zencart/8x10-in-fuji-xray-film-p-384.html?zenid=8a5c951aa13ae190023c8304c9afb4d4
If it wasn't 3000 miles and a shipping cost away, I'd be very tempted.
Some of the caffenol results with this film are very good indeed - even good old D76 does well with it.


PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tesselator wrote:
mmelvis wrote:
Sample images here
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?80011-Images-shot-on-X-ray-film


Thanks! That's interesting. So from that thread I take it that it's like very problematic B&W film.

That it works at all is news to me, thanks again!


Some folks really like the film. The emulsion seems to be a little more fragile than standard film, easily scratched. There is supposed to be a variant that is only coated with emulsion on one side.


PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2012 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, it looks like it could be a very creative film!


PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 12:40 am    Post subject: Re: Very cheap large format film - x-ray Reply with quote

luisalegria wrote:

- Theoretially one could use a safelight to cut and load it (it is orthochromatic) but in practice it fogs easily, so assume darkroom cutting would be needed.


Kodak and others make a special 'beehive' safelight that has a different colour filter to the normal yellow one used for printing. The safelight is fine for handling the films, loading them into the cassettes (or in our case film holders) and for developing visually.

Standard panoramic or sheet xray films are developed in a tall rectangular tank hung into it from a small metal bar with two clips holding the film in place. a couple of bulldog or alligator clips will do and lots of radiographers used that method. tray processing will work but will damage the very soft emulsion.

Of course these films are ortho films and mainly sensitive to blue. the use of tungsten light will require much longer exposures as someone else has pointed out. Mixed light sources give 'interesting' results.


PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know that's quite old post but quite visible on web so it's worth to write here some important information about x-ray film. I'm shooting quite a lot pictures on few different x-ray films. My favourite are Fuji Super RX blue which is double side emulsion coated. There are two kind of most x-ray films - blue and green sensitive. I prefer blue but it's up to personal taste. Double coating is not a problem in my opinion. You can use traditional BW chemistry to develop all the xray, but I would say it's more similar to paper than film developing. Red safe light possible to use especially with blue sensitive film.

You can find some examples of pictures on my blog and to search "xray" there:
www.wozaczynski.com/blog/?s=xray


PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome wozaczynski! Thank you for informations.


PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A lot of x-ray films have two emulsions, one on either side. This can produce interestingly soft results. I think single emulsion films would be better. But they are dearer.

Alas x-ray films are going the way of camera films as digital image sensors are used more in hospitals.

You always have a special developer for x-ray films. Its like a normal film dev.

Iangreenhalgh1 uses odd films including x-ray he, I guess, is the resident expert.


PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
A lot of x-ray films have two emulsions, one on either side. This can produce interestingly soft results. I think single emulsion films would be better. But they are dearer.

Alas x-ray films are going the way of camera films as digital image sensors are used more in hospitals.

You always have a special developer for x-ray films. Its like a normal film dev.

Iangreenhalgh1 uses odd films including x-ray he, I guess, is the resident expert.


Indeed, a lot of films are double side coated. Maybe under the enlarger it could produce quite a different result, but when scanned - there's no difference between single and double side coated films. The main difference is because xray film is really prone to scratches - so obviously those double coated are much harder to avoid it when tray developed.
Yes - the digital sensors are used mostly in hospitals, but there's huge demand for xray film in veterinary. And probably in some not really rich countries.
Chemistry for xray films is completely different however for photography it's working perfectly with almost every BW developers and fixer.


PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wozaczynski wrote:

You can find some examples of pictures on my blog and to search "xray" there:
www.wozaczynski.com/blog/?s=xray


Welcome to MFL forum.
Nice images using x-ray film!


PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2015 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Surprisingly good images.
Thank you for sharing these.
Tom