Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Understanding ISO trade offs
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:14 am    Post subject: Understanding ISO trade offs Reply with quote

Hi
I was reading in some internet tutorials (not sure about their quality)
that higher the iso you get more grain you will have, less sharpness and also less tonal and dynamic range.

If you want very beautiful colors, e.t.c you need to use a slower iso film like 25 or 50.
For some reasons I always felt I like the faster iso, like the 400 that allows me with the daily light to increase shutter speed and hand hold the camera.
Can someone show me some samples of iso 400, for example vs iso 50?

I would like to thank you in advance for your reply
Regards
A.


PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For CN, you won't find anything else than 200 or 400 nowadays (I think I shot some old 100 rolls years ago), and these colors go though processing and are anyone's guess anyway
Main 'advantage' - if any - would be less un-saturated colours, more contrasty etc. I should think; resolution on modern films is insane anyway

For E6 you just have to take our word for it, or seek out some Velvia RVP 50 samples against whatever iso 400. Unfortunately Sensia 100 which gave so nice reds and blues in a neutral not Velvia-redshift package is no more.

If you like to shoot 400 slides there is Fujichrome 400 - Sensia 400 I think or the professional version provia 400x i believe. This stock is amazing. It is lauded generally.
I shot some and the resolution is almost sensia 100, colors are less saturated (not so good for november-like cloudy faded days). People laud its speed and acceptable resolution/contrast, its versatility.
Sensia 200 is (usually?) in fact the same thing with an added layer of duh.


PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2014 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Both Kodak and I believe Fuji still make CN 100 film. Don't know about the Fuji but Kodak Ektar 100 is readily available in Canada.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 9:19 am    Post subject: Welcome Reply with quote

Hi guys,Thanks for your information.I am beginner of photography.Can any tell which is better kodax or fuji ? .Thanks Advance Very Happy


PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:21 am    Post subject: Re: Welcome Reply with quote

elitefilming wrote:
Hi guys,Thanks for your information.I am beginner of photography.Can any tell which is better kodax or fuji ? .Thanks Advance Very Happy


Well it should be "what is better for you" Wink Just use Fuji Superia 200 for a while. then Fuji superia 400, then Kodak Ektar, then Kodak Portra...these are the more common ones, and over time you will find what you like and the best value for money (if you are price conscious) as some are more expensive than others.
Some people are quite content using Agfa Vista from Poundland (UK) for 1.


PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you go down the E6 route, exposure can be critical and you can't change ISO from the manufacturer's stated rate. Perhaps unless you are processing it yourself which I wouldn't recommend as it's more complicated than b&W.

Again, the quality of a colour film is only as good as the lab that processes it. If you are considering using a pro lab, it may be worth asking them about the merits of various films, and they would probably be able to supply them too.


PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2014 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I buy most of my film from Freestyle http://www.freestylephoto.biz/ or from EBAY. A quick look at Freestyle showed:

Color negative film, Process C41

Adox ISO 100
Agfa ISO 200 and 400
CineStill ISO 50, (Daylight) and ISO 800 (Tungsten)
Fuji ISO 200 and 400
Kodak ISO 100, 160, 200, 400, and 800
Rollei ISO 200 and 400

Color slide film, Process E6

Fuji ISO 50 and 100

I would think there are other color films marketed, this was just a fast check.

I like Kodak Ektar, ISO 100 color negative film. All my slide film is old expired Fuji ISO 50.

Phil