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So much dissapointed from the colour film
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PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 7:14 pm    Post subject: So much dissapointed from the colour film Reply with quote

Hi
today I got my first dissapointment when I got the results from my color film. Unfortunately I do not remember which one it was . I guess kodak 200 iso, or local store private label 200 iso.
The results of all the film roll can be found here:

http://alexpal.smugmug.com/ToShare/FilmInColour/n-KSSbk

I have been experimenting quite a lot... but is not what it botheres me that the shots look bad ( am to blame for that) but mostly I am mostly dissapointed with the color rendition that they look over saturated to my eyes.

Please go a first round and write your comments. I will return back with more questions for specific shots I have

Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see nothing wrong with the colours, definitely not over saturated.

Also, there is nothing stopping you from altering the colours in software,just as you would with a digital shot.


PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iangreenhalgh1 wrote:
I see nothing wrong with the colours, definitely not over saturated.


+1
I think looks more like a flare problem


PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2014 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks Ok to me too for a cheap color film - different films have different color rendition.
You may try different one - for example i really like FUJICOLOR PRO 160S.


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 6:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The flare problem comes from the train window. I have spent some time shooting behind my seat window


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The color looks fine to me. Unless you are talking about the color shift in the photos taken under artificial light (inside the train). But you can change the color balance to correct this in almost any photo editing software.


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The colours are typical film colours. If you don't like them, shoot digital.


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for letting me know.
I am just going around now with an iso 200 film shooting compositions that are full of colour. Would be back with one or two weeks

Alex


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
can someone try to explain me how one can describe the "character" of the colors in the film? Are more saturated? Do they have less tones? Are more contrasty? Can someone give some scientific language here?

Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
Can someone give some scientific language here?


Very Happy


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
Hi,
can someone try to explain me how one can describe the "character" of the colors in the film? Are more saturated? Do they have less tones? Are more contrasty? Can someone give some scientific language here?

Regards
Alex


Well e.g. unless you are very careful with a digital camera....a digital shot of a woman's skin can look waxy compared to film....sorta like people in Madame Tussauds.


PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The colours look well balanced but a little cool for my taste. That can be changed as others say.

The exact colours from film depend on many factors:

1: Type and make of film
2: Film storage and expiry date
3: Film processing
4: Lens
5: Exposure
6: Scan
7: Printing paper
8: Print processing

not to mention screen colour balance, and the light source in the scanner

A change in any one of these (all other things being equal) Will make a difference.

View your photos on different screens, perhaps your TV will be a good one, you are already familiar with its colour, saturation and contrast.

In the old film days pros who shot dozens of rolls a week would standardize their work so they would get consistent work. Same lens, film, lab etc.

Good efforts anyway and keep it up.


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would go to a library and look at some illustrated books from different decades (ones that haven't faded much).

On computer screen all colours turn first digital.


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think they look great Smile


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Challenge accepted. I am taking two colour films and I would be shooting compositions with colour.
1a. Suggest me one colour film that you like.. bit fast would be preferred as here in germany weather turns quite cloudy
1b. Any ideas on composition based on colour. Motivation is to shoot that way that the "color reproduction" of the film would become more apparent

2. I still see a specific character in the film color capabilities.. Perhaps is more saturated or has less tonal range. I guess you can still describe it more precisely to me

Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Challenge accepted. I am taking two colour films and I would be shooting compositions with colour.
1a. Suggest me one colour film that you like.. bit fast would be preferred as here in germany weather turns quite cloudy
1b. Any ideas on composition based on colour. Motivation is to shoot that way that the "color reproduction" of the film would become more apparent

2. I still see a specific character in the film color capabilities.. Perhaps is more saturated or has less tonal range. I guess you can still describe it more precisely to me

Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
1. Challenge accepted. I am taking two colour films and I would be shooting compositions with colour.
1a. Suggest me one colour film that you like.. bit fast would be preferred as here in germany weather turns quite cloudy
1b. Any ideas on composition based on colour. Motivation is to shoot that way that the "color reproduction" of the film would become more apparent

2. I still see a specific character in the film color capabilities.. Perhaps is more saturated or has less tonal range. I guess you can still describe it more precisely to me

Regards
Alex


Digital has no advantage over film for colourful shots.....If you want me to post colourful shots it's no problem, but if you browse through shots taking by film you can see for yourself. If you can get some Kodak Gold 200 cheap? This film is a non pro film and made for Joe public using even the cheapest cameras, so the colours and contrast are enhanced.
If you check on Ebay or forums you can occasional pick up some great deals...the last one (last year) was 20 sealed rolls of Kodak Gold 100 (out of date) from Greece $23 with free post...well by the time I checked out the film and ordered another 20, the guy had put the price up to $32.90....Rolling Eyes but still a good price.


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see nothing wrong with the colours - they are typical for a dull day. The biggest negative is the number of shots through the train window as the reflections are killing the contrast. I think that being keen to see the results quickly, you have been shooting film like digital. Some of your shots are good and one or two could have been very good - the ploughed field would have been so much more attractive without the loop cut off at the bottom, but that would have been impossible to set up out of a speeding train window.

It is usual for the first few films shot to be classed as "training", such as learning about exposure (your shots here are mainly well exposed), but it would be useful to find out more about what works in composition too, with tricks like rule of thirds, leading lines, s-curves etc.

Don't be disheartened in the early days - the rewards come later and are the result of experience.


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
actually I am not fun of kodak for "some" reasons. Any recommendation for other manufacturers would be also appreciated. I d onot really know what is in the market so if you just dump some film products here I would spend some time on internet looking on their results

Alex


PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The two big names in Colour Print Film are Kodak and Fuji. Both have excellent products. Fuji's equivalent of Kodak Gold is called "Superior" and is very good for everyday photography (as is Gold). Agfa used to be a big producer but their Vista film is now made by Fuji (we all believe).


PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All modern colour films are good enough, even the dreaded Kodak Colorplus 200. Cloudy weather doesn't help but it isn't all that much of a hurdle to overcome once you learn how to work around it.

There is a learning curve and you just have to have the patience to overcome it.


PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

alaios wrote:
Hi,
actually I am not fun of kodak for "some" reasons. Any recommendation for other manufacturers would be also appreciated. I d onot really know what is in the market so if you just dump some film products here I would spend some time on internet looking on their results

Alex


If you can find some OOD Ferrania FG 200 PLUS (must be plus) going cheap it gives very warm results, a bit grainy but on the right subject works, and worth playing with.

Vivitar 24mm f2 at f2 gives a good "yesteryear camera\film" look to this scene (h'mm well ignore the cars) ..the chimney in the house next to the white one is leaning over and it's not the lens.


PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
one more film developed.
I am not giving one by one photos just the gallery link if you want to have a look.
That was a kodak ultramax 400.
http://alexpal.smugmug.com/ToShare/FilmKodakGoldUltramax400/n-V4h95

The landscape shots are inside my train and thus again the flare and the low contrast problem.
Still I find the colour (from the non-inside the train shots) to have a specific character
Alex


PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The best shot inside the train was the last with blue seats, but IMO taking shots of a boring landscape, in dull conditions and from inside a train is just a waste of film and money.


PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's some examples from Kodak rolls I've shot in the last few weeks, all developed at my local supermarket, scanned on my Plustek 7600i.

Kodak MAX 400, Minolta AF 3.5-4.5/35-105. I didn't shoot any more colourful scenes with that roll:




Kodak Royal Supra 200, Minolta AF 3.5-4.5/28-85:




Kodak Gold 100, Tokina 3.5-4.5/20-35:




Kodak ColorPlus 200, Minolta AF 3.5-4.5/35-135:




Kodak Gold 100, Minolta AF 3.5-4.5/28-85, dull, cloudy day:




Kodak Gold 100, Minolta AF 3.5-4.5/28-85, bright sunny day:




You can see the different films give different colours, and the Tokina is a little different in colours than the two Minoltas - the Tokina being cooler and less saturated. I am lucky that my local supermarket always does an excellent developing job. All the films shown here, with the exception of the ColorPlus which is in date, were expired at least 4 years, but I think they are all acceptably good in the colours department.

See if you can find some Fujicolor 200 or Agfa Vista Plus 200 (also made by Fuji) I have always had very nice results with those two and they are consistent in their results, if they don't come out nice, then I think you need to find a different lab to process your films.