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PostPosted: Sat Mar 05, 2011 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurence, gorgeous, you are the king of slide!


Jussi, love the second one, well caught!


PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2011 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Bill... I'm horning in with the Box Tengor, this is with Delta 100 from 2 years ago somewhere in Pennsylvania


Metro's Bar - Restaurant Pizza by Nesster, on Flickr


PostPosted: Sun Mar 06, 2011 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice one, Jussi, when are they putting a roof on that place? Laughing Real
ballsy using 100 film in these cameras, I like your style. Wink


PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Coronet Meniscus


PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 7:36 pm    Post subject: Coronet Meniscus Reply with quote

Coronet Meniscus



PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I finally got a hold of a 6x9 film holder for my Mamiya Super 23, which will be the default back I use with it (I have my 67II for 6x7).


Mamiya Super 23 + Sekor 100mm f2.8 + Fuji Astia 100F


In the woods. by Dr. RawheaD, on Flickr


PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had to google the Coronet Meniscus --- interesting results, what the Lensbaby hopes to be maybe.

Very nice result with the 23 - do you find this combination is good to use, photographically? I've cast green eyes toward Bill's Koni Omegas before, now I have to do so with the Mamiya too Laughing


PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gotta LOVE the Box Tengor shot, Jussi!

Rawhead, that's quite an outfit, and seems to be pretty sharp!

I really do like that shot of the church with the Coronet Meniscus, it has
an old-time feel to it.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 09, 2011 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nesster wrote:

Very nice result with the 23 - do you find this combination is good to use, photographically? I've cast green eyes toward Bill's Koni Omegas before, now I have to do so with the Mamiya too Laughing



Yes, it's great. The 100/2.8 is an awesome lens. For 6x7 It'd come second only to my smc 105/2.4 on my 67II, but in 6x9, I don't know of a better "shallow DoF" lens/camera combo that I can think of.

However, I have come to the conclusion that the rear tilt movements of the Super 23 is really cumbersome and never get used, so i've decided to swap the body with a straight-up Mamiya Universal. The advantage of the latter is that with it, I get to shoot Polaroid/Fuji instant film in 2x3 Smile So, a Mamiya 23 + 6x7 back + 127mm lens will be going on the market real soon.


PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here some of my first results with the Voigtlnder Bessa 6x9 (manufactured 1942-1945) which I purchased two weeks ago. Pictures shot in the old innercity of Utrecht. Film: Kodak 400TX.

1.


2.


3.


PostPosted: Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice result with the Bessa.



Modern Business Machines by Nesster, on Flickr

Kodak 160NC in the Goerz Tenax


PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Jussi!

Not just nice -- this is REALLY nice. It has a certain look about it that gives
me a feel of somewhere back in a time when things were somewhat
simpler. It might be the Goerz lens adding that "touch" as well.

This is an introspective, quiet, and beautifully composed image.


PostPosted: Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Attila wrote:
Welta Weltur 6x9 Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar Provia 100




Simply......magnificent. Shocked


PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2011 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurence wrote:
Hey Jussi!

Not just nice -- this is REALLY nice. It has a certain look about it that gives
me a feel of somewhere back in a time when things were somewhat
simpler. It might be the Goerz lens adding that "touch" as well.

This is an introspective, quiet, and beautifully composed image.


Thank you - I find shooting with these old folders is the most fun, I'm on my own for focus, exposure, even compensating for view finder skew. It is relaxing for sure.

The main problem is that these old cameras are a bit fragile in old age, I keep a rotation so as not to stress any one of them over much.

Here's another from the Goerz - this is the second roll through, the first after I fixed her up properly. The focus seems accurate - at least corresponds to my distance estimation - but the little brilliant finder points kind of high. Now I know.
no not the animules again by Nesster, on Flickr


PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2011 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jussi wrote: Thank you - I find shooting with these old folders is
the most fun, I'm on my own for focus, exposure, even compensating
for view finder skew. It is relaxing for sure.

The main problem is that these old cameras are a bit fragile in old
age, I keep a rotation so as not to stress any one of them
over much.

Here's another from the Goerz - this is the second roll through,
the first after I fixed her up properly. The focus seems accurate -
at least corresponds to my distance estimation - but the little
brilliant finder points kind of high. Now I know.


Once again, I see a "signature" from the Goerz. I know that it is difficult
to render anything of substance onto a monitor, but I think that the
Goerz DOES render a different feel. Of course, just like the "Zeiss look", it's
hard to explain. Perhaps it's something in the microcontrast, or perhaps
it's something inherent in the lens being so "bare" of coatings and other
"additions".

GREAT experimentation, and like you said, now you can aim a little
"high" through the viewfinder.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 12:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

finally I have internet at the house again. Razz

Fuji GW 690iii acrosa100@100

A rare succesful Panned take.


Same day I took some of these reflections with Rollei Retro 80s. Across looks great as well


PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow Andy, second is great!


PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the first one is great too! I've never had much luck with getting
the subject so well focused when panning. Your image is spot-on.

You mentioned "across"...did you mean "Acros" film?


PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

+1 on the last two --

that reflection is very enticing. I could imagine going across it to the realm of the wee ones... till Larry brought up the film name Laughing


PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 10:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks you guys. I'm happy you like them.
Yes I did miss the spelling Smile Fuji Acros100 was the film.
I will leave it so the comments make sense Wink
It's great stuff although a bit curly if it dries to fast.


PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Orio wrote:
Wow Andy, second is great!


+10


PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agfa Clack again. After this roll I understand this camera a bit better. I have some ideas of how I would make use of it's "flaws" or rather "personality" Laughing

Fuji Acros @ 100 in tmaxdev 1:4 5.5min @ 20c



PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is B&W! Excellent I love it Andy!


PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Attila Smile
Using the rudimentary Clack is a lot of fun.
Just frame pick one of two aperture settings and clack. Nothing else to do really.
Here it is again.



PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like you're having as much fun with the Clack as I am with these
Kodak Signet 35s. Great result with both film and developing!