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Restoring old cameras?
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2019 10:02 pm    Post subject: Restoring old cameras? Reply with quote

Are there any ways to replace the worn black paint on old cameras? Can it be done with thick ink or something else, and would it be advisable to polish it with wax on both the plastic and metal parts in order to refresh the finish?


PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2019 6:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cameras that have paint on metal typically have black enamel baked onto brass. It's because of this method that touch-ups are problematic. I've used Sharpie markers, which will cover the brassed areas, but it rubs off pretty quickly. I've also used these paint pens you can buy -- they even have a little rattle ball inside. I've found gloss black enamel paint pens and I've used them on cameras. The paint lasts longer, but the patched area shows, and it will eventually flake off.

Bottom line, I've just come to accept brassing as a normal patina that indicates the sort of life the camera has lived.


PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Birchwood super black pens. I have successfully used one to touch up wear and scratches on all variety of cameras and lenses. I prefer the flat black for camera. Here it is on ebay
#1


PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recently in the forum I learned about the products "Aluminum Black" and "Crinkle Paint"


PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
Birchwood super black pens. I have successfully used one to touch up wear and scratches on all variety of cameras and lenses. I prefer the flat black for camera. Here it is on ebay



Does it stay on when cleaned? I use a permanent marker pen for unsightly marks, but it wears off after a clean or two on metal, so have been looking for something better.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about using UV-resin mixed with black color powder? Maybe I should try that because I think that will give a very hard and resistant surface..


PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2019 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The challenge is blending it into the old surface, though.


PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cooltouch wrote:
The challenge is blending it into the old surface, though.


Absolutely correct !!

It's surprising how many different colour "blacks" there are ... some are very dark green, very dark blue, or very dark grey ... all different to the "black" you've got on your brush.

The worst thing is that the difference often only shows once the "repair" is dry Sad


PostPosted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like this Tamiya Color Acrylic Paint, this is the X-18 semi gloss black, but there are other blacks. Get the jar of thinners as well.

I've used this on camera bodies and with some patience and practice made nearly invisible paint repairs. Apply the paint sparingly with a tiny artists brush, then when it becomes tacky, lick your finger and gently rub the paint surface, you will see brush marks flatten and dissapear, and at the edges where the new paint meets the old it can be smoothed to match the original paint thickness, and a thin layer of new paint can be blended in on top of the original. If it looks awful, wipe it off with a bit of the thinners, and try again. The rubbing with a wet finger also 'adjusts' the level of gloss. With a bit of practice this technique works well, especially where the camera paint is chipped on film door hinges and corners. It's more difficult on 'patina' wear such as top plates where fingers rub, but I like that patina and leave that alone.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tamiya-Acrylic-Mini-Gloss-Black/dp/B000BX5EKM/ref=pd_sbs_21_7?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B000BX5EKM&pd_rd_r=9ec732ab-a40f-11e9-b65a-2f57212fe850&pd_rd_w=ND6cv&pd_rd_wg=syPtC&pf_rd_p=18edf98b-139a-41ee-bb40-d725dd59d1d3&pf_rd_r=D3DVP75NZ8W41YNQRJ3K&psc=1&refRID=D3DVP75NZ8W41YNQRJ3K


PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sciolist wrote:
philslizzy wrote:
Birchwood super black pens. I have successfully used one to touch up wear and scratches on all variety of cameras and lenses. I prefer the flat black for camera. Here it is on ebay



Does it stay on when cleaned? I use a permanent marker pen for unsightly marks, but it wears off after a clean or two on metal, so have been looking for something better.


Yes it's a paint originally designed for guns. It's as permanent as it gets, it is not a permanent marker.[/b]


PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lloydy wrote:
I like this Tamiya Color Acrylic Paint, this is the X-18 semi gloss black, but there are other blacks. Get the jar of thinners as well.

I've used this on camera bodies and with some patience and practice made nearly invisible paint repairs. Apply the paint sparingly with a tiny artists brush, then when it becomes tacky, lick your finger and gently rub the paint surface, you will see brush marks flatten and dissapear, and at the edges where the new paint meets the old it can be smoothed to match the original paint thickness, and a thin layer of new paint can be blended in on top of the original. If it looks awful, wipe it off with a bit of the thinners, and try again. The rubbing with a wet finger also 'adjusts' the level of gloss. With a bit of practice this technique works well, especially where the camera paint is chipped on film door hinges and corners. It's more difficult on 'patina' wear such as top plates where fingers rub, but I like that patina and leave that alone.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tamiya-Acrylic-Mini-Gloss-Black/dp/B000BX5EKM/ref=pd_sbs_21_7?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B000BX5EKM&pd_rd_r=9ec732ab-a40f-11e9-b65a-2f57212fe850&pd_rd_w=ND6cv&pd_rd_wg=syPtC&pf_rd_p=18edf98b-139a-41ee-bb40-d725dd59d1d3&pf_rd_r=D3DVP75NZ8W41YNQRJ3K&psc=1&refRID=D3DVP75NZ8W41YNQRJ3K


Dave's idea is good, I've done it myself and like the idea of adjusting the level of gloss but the paint can wear off if the lens or camera is well used. i've discovered that through experience.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about using the acrylic paint and have a thin layer with UV-resin on top of that? Wouldn´t that prevent the wear off problem? And is Tamiya Color Acrylic Paint different from ordinary artist acrylic paint?


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The acrylic paint used by artists is very thick, yet dries rather quickly. It can be thinned, though. As for whether it's the same or not, the way I see it, acrylic is acrylic. So its properties will probably be similar, if not the same.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Coefficients of expansion differences large enough can cause layer separation problems.

Add pigment to the uv resin.Smile


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
Yes it's a paint originally designed for guns. It's as permanent as it gets, it is not a permanent marker.[/b]



Thanks.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

philslizzy wrote:
Sciolist wrote:
philslizzy wrote:
Birchwood super black pens. I have successfully used one to touch up wear and scratches on all variety of cameras and lenses. I prefer the flat black for camera. Here it is on ebay



Does it stay on when cleaned? I use a permanent marker pen for unsightly marks, but it wears off after a clean or two on metal, so have been looking for something better.


Yes it's a paint originally designed for guns. It's as permanent as it gets, it is not a permanent marker.[/b]


Good to hear that. Great tip, thanks. I could use some of that.


PostPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2019 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Birchwood Casey makes good stuff. I've used their instant gun blue, works very well. And their TruOil is a great, general purpose wood finish. It leaves a thin, hard finish. Besides gunstocks, I've used it to finish furniture and guitars. Not much wood on cameras -- except maybe old field cameras, in which case, I would recommend it highly. So, it doesn't surprise me their paint pens work as well as they do.