Home
SearchSearch MemberlistMemberlist RegisterRegister ProfileProfile Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages Log inLog in

Pushing HP5 to 3200 or Ilford 3200
View previous topic :: View next topic  


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:15 am    Post subject: Pushing HP5 to 3200 or Ilford 3200 Reply with quote

Hi all,
I am on a business trip in Washington DC and I am thinking to try some street photography at night. I guess only iso 3200 would give me speeds fast enough to have some fun.
The two options I have is either pushing a HP5 or buying this Ilford 3200 film. Which of the two options would you consider as better to try?


Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HP5 pushes poorly, Delta 400 is better, but 3200 is a bit much; try 1600 and then use Microphen to develop it.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you only have one camera, I would go for either the ISO 1600 or 3200. Maybe pick up a 2 stop neutral density filter too.

With all the photo opportunities, shooting ISO 400 in the daytime and high ISO for night should not be too much problem. Sacrificing a few frames on a roll of film doesn't cost that much. Just change out the film as necessary.

Phil


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
I bought a HP5 that I might push to 800 and an ilford 3200 delta for night shooting. I hope 3200 iso would be enough for shutter speeds of 1/125 and apertures around 8 to 11... If not I would have to push it to 6400

Regards
A


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
I bought a HP5 that I might push to 800 and an ilford 3200 delta for night shooting. I hope 3200 iso would be enough for shutter speeds of 1/125 and apertures around 8 to 11... If not I would have to push it to 6400

Regards
A


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've pushed Foma 400 to 3200 and 6400, both with fine results. Foma pushed better and retains less grain than HP5+.


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi I mean pushing the iso 3200 ilford film to 6400 and not the hp5 to 6400.

It is more how much iso I need for night photography (light coming from street lamps and signs)

A


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Man, you guys sure are pushy! Wink


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pushing films or not one more question (so I do not flood forum with multiple posts).

I want to try some shoots with great depth of field at sunset. I have a 28-85 (3.5-5.6) lens and if I am not if I want large depth of field while keeping as large as possible the aperture (to allow light to get iinside) I should be shooting around 28-35 with apertures of 4-8.

What would be your iso film choice if you knew that the maximum shutter speed your camera had is 1 second.

Reformulating:
Shooting at sunset and sunrsire conditions with an aperutre of 4-8 and with maximum shutter speed of 1 second (no chance to shoot B at my cheap tripod) what would be your iso preference to start with?


Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sunrise and sunset can be pretty bright. Light reflecting from clouds can be photographed at relatively low ISO and shutter speeds from 1/60 on up, f11 to 16. Bracketing by 2 or more stops can change the colors dramatically. Look at Flickr, [/url]https://www.flickr.com/search/?q=sunsets[url] for some guide to exposure. Lots of the posted photos have EXIF data attached.

Phil


PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2014 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are right. I had a a look and people even use short shutter speeds.
At dawn or dusk situation seem to be different

https://www.flickr.com/photos/keviikev/14527017137/in/photolist-o8GL5H-oHBSkq-oeKv8B-o8cnj2-oyaC3i-ovaiAS-oKE2yo-obvD6D-ooJM8Y-oXGEjW-oeTmky-oHeAVj-oHy89i-oKJmhG-oo2fK9-opq4ac-oApqaS-otnNHU-obQf5E-oouPdQ-oJZW4G-o9br9U-osgxzK-or6LGW-oKdGUg-oa3Kem-oHDJSi-orTuye-oeCg9Z-oNZhir-obpx5d-oNyC12-ov6NWj-oEScku-oqWKYS-oGTaVX-oFfjyG-ocrpw4-omSfAJ-orEFBn-oHcnfB-osPBPk-ouSREm-oEtwas-oaPmU1-oDCh2f-oDXSs5-oLevP5-ooabKq-odPH7V

the first shot needed 30 seconds... which is quite a lot given that I have maximum shutter speed of 1 second...


PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
just to update. I took delta 3200 for a walk. I was metering at 3200-1/2 which I guess it is iso 2500. I would develop though for 3200.

I found that 3200 to not be enough for outdoor shooting, at night, when you have only city lights available. I would try next time at 6400 or even more.

Regards
Alex


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 1:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Get a tripod!

Seriously, if iso 3200 isn't enough, you need to modify your technique.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well a tripod would never allow me to freeze movement at night.
How do you freeze a mussician with a tripod? How do you freeze people walking just by city lights?
I still think I need faster iso for the type of shooting I am looking for.


I would let you know
A


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 11:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A flashgun of course!

Check out the work of Weegee (Arthur Felig); he produced amazing street photography in New York in the 30s, 40s and 50s and he was definitely not using fast film!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weegee

Quote:
Most of his notable photographs were taken with very basic press photographer equipment and methods of the era, a 4x5 Speed Graphic camera preset at f/16 at 1/200 of a second, with flashbulbs and a set focus distance of ten feet.


Another photographer to study would be Brassa (Gyula Halsz) who produced many nighttime shots in Paris in the 30s and 40s:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassai

For me, Brassai was the best nighttime street photographer of them all:

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=brassai&safe=off&client=firefox-a&hs=9ys&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=sb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=ppYJVPfRJajb7AbezIDQDA&ved=0CKQBEIke&biw=2144&bih=1053&dpr=0.9#safe=off&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&channel=sb&tbm=isch&q=brassai%20street%20photography&revid=1445792946&imgdii=_

I'd chose a fast prime such as a 50mm 1.7 or 1.8, if I was using an SLR, although the best solution would be a rangefinder such as a Kiev or Contax with either the 1.5/50 or 2/50 Jupiter/Sonnar. I've taken shots with my Contax and 1.5/50 Sonnar at 1/25sec that have no shake - the heavy body and lack of mirror and other moving parts is a big advantage over an SLR when it comes to handholding at low speeds. Alternatively, use an AF compact camera with a fairly fast prime such as a 2.8/35 that has an AF illuminator to enable focusing in the dark.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,
thanks for the nice material you provided me. I will study them later on when I will have time Smile

from my side I am sending you those two links for increasing iso to sexy levels


http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subscription/choosing%20bw%20films.html
(search for "Drummer, New York City")

http://the35mmproject.org/2013/10/26/ilford-delta-3200-pushed-to-12800/


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd stick to digital for this type of thing.

If you must use film, use a wide aperture lens, zooms lose too much light, use at least a f1.8 prime on your Minolta, f1.4's were designed with this type of work in mind.

Assuming you were shooting at say, 15th at full aperture with 3200 ISO film and a medium zoom lens, with a 1.8 lens you could shoot at 30th but at 800 ISO.

Alternatively use the film at normal speed and bounce a flash off the ceiling. Flash guns for your Minolta can be had for just a few pounds/dollars/euros

Pushing a film this much is going to give low quality images. You'll have grain like golf balls - nay, footballs.


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For pushing, no more than 2 stops and use a speed-increasing developer like Microphen.

Modern T-grain emulsions like Delta 400 or TMAX 400 are the best for this, you will get golfball-like grain, but as Phil said, with older emulsions, you will get football grain. Smile


PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 11:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks I enjoyed for your comments.

I do not have any prime with me but I would try both
to shoot with primes and also try once iso 6400 and see.

Btw do you always carry primes for that? To be honest I find zoom to be a great compositional tool by trying very fast different compositions. With a prime one has to do a lot of walking back and forth.
My fastest prime though is the 45mm minolta with f/2 that I like to shoot stopped down (I guess that would be 2.Cool

Regards
A

btw did you see the shots on the links I sent? They look intresting to try